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Buses with outside rear staircases on the Nether Edge route in 1946/7.I was told they were borrowed from Halifax.

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On 09/11/2019 at 08:57, gaz 786 said:

What about the bloke that tapped on windows to get people up for work every day with his long stick to reach bedrooms 👽

Hi gaz 786

 

Interesting comment !  Was aware of this practice, but did it occur in Sheffield ?

Thought it to be something then went on in the W Yorks mill towns.

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2 hours ago, Runningman said:

Hi gaz 786

 

Interesting comment !  Was aware of this practice, but did it occur in Sheffield ?

Thought it to be something then went on in the W Yorks mill towns.

Yes it occurred here and it was usually the gas lamp lighter who did it with the long pole he had for lighting the gas lights on the streets.

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8 hours ago, Kidorry said:

Yes it occurred here and it was usually the gas lamp lighter who did it with the long pole he had for lighting the gas lights on the streets.

Hi Kidorry

 

Wasn't are of the practice where I lived as a kid at Highfields in Sheffield, although we were well away from any of the Sheffield area pits  i.e. Nunnery and Handsworth. Lads working those locations would be up early for the 6-00 am start and therefore some of them would have required that knock on the bedroom window.  Was the Knocker Up paid for his task I wonder ?

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With unreliable, and often broken, wind up clocks in those days, a common expression was,"Knock me up in the morning!"

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11 hours ago, Runningman said:

Hi Kidorry

 

Wasn't are of the practice where I lived as a kid at Highfields in Sheffield, although we were well away from any of the Sheffield area pits  i.e. Nunnery and Handsworth. Lads working those locations would be up early for the 6-00 am start and therefore some of them would have required that knock on the bedroom window.  Was the Knocker Up paid for his task I wonder ?

Most of the steel works started their morning shift at 6 a.m. and I think the knocker-up would get a few pence from the persons he knocked up. I can remember the gas lamp working at the end of our street. 

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4 hours ago, trastrick said:

With unreliable, and often broken, wind up clocks in those days, a common expression was,"Knock me up in the morning!"

There was a guy lived on Cambridge Rd. opposite the bottom of Carter Rd. who had the job of cleaning the glass on the old gas lamps and winding up the clocks. This was the early sixties, he was known as "Top hat" (don't ask),  local window cleaners would buy "scrim cloth" from him.

 

4x2

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On 12/11/2019 at 09:38, Runningman said:

Hi gaz 786

 

Interesting comment !  Was aware of this practice, but did it occur in Sheffield ?

Thought it to be something then went on in the W Yorks mill towns.

Only heard him a few times when we were kids stopping at grandparents there was quite a few so they could wake a lot of workers at the same time usually steel and mine workers but then again there wasn't really any alternative work no. Idea how they got payed maybe the employer paid them to make sure workforce turned up 🤔

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6 hours ago, Fourbytwo said:

There was a guy lived on Cambridge Rd. opposite the bottom of Carter Rd. who had the job of cleaning the glass on the old gas lamps and winding up the clocks. This was the early sixties, he was known as "Top hat" (don't ask),  local window cleaners would buy "scrim cloth" from him.

 

4x2

My grandfather was one of the lamplighters for Walkley/Crookes, although I never knew him as he died in 1945; this would be before they introduced the timers.

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The company I work for if they were short of workers on a morning shift 6 to 2  they sent a  utility man round to people's houses to knock you up by throwing little stones at the bedroom window to ask you if you want to work that shift it was called a double one 

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Far things. I remember my mum giving me 4 to spend  at Jennings house/shop on Archer Lane!   I was told they made a penny.   My grandma put silver 3d  in the Christmas pudding, as the were, no tin foil in those days.  

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13 hours ago, trastrick said:

With unreliable, and often broken, wind up clocks in those days, a common expression was,"Knock me up in the morning!"

And as you know that has an entirely different meaning in Canada 😉

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