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On ancestry you have the option to keep your tree private and you do not have to display your photo either, plus you can use a pseudonym. For full DNA matches they will need to have had their DNA tested too. 

 

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Ancestry is a bit vague  , gives   ancestors as coming from British Isles given we are a hybrid race of allsorts I  expected more depth

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Thank you for replying everyone. Got my results today. What nightmare lots 1st second cousins and so on

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Congrats of getting your results. It will take time for them to sink in, so take your time on following up any matches. 

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What absolutel nightmare. Hundreds in fact thousands Harrison’s in Sheffield and there links to London USA and beyond.. like looking for needle in haystack 😒..on positive note I’m getting closer. To the mystery.

who the daddy is 🤪 I’ve been trying only 35 years. I’ve not given up yet.never been quitter. Thing is with the ancestry it’s ok doing the dna but if the close relative doesn’t then your hitting brick wall again, and looking for that link of relatives whom have given there dna is good but frustrating. I do respect having said that some just simply don’t want the hassle and don’t reply. If that makes sense 🤔anyone on here got any tips or advice they could give me ? I would be grateful 

Edited by terri37
Because I wanted to

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On 26/09/2019 at 16:02, tlangdon12 said:

Congrats of getting your results. It will take time for them to sink in, so take your time on following up any matches. 

Thank you. 

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On 27/05/2019 at 23:19, El Cid said:

AncestryDNA® can reveal your heritage and connect you to family past and present.

Only £79*
 
Has anyone tried it? I find it interesting, there is also the health side.
What do you get for £79? I have spent £50 plus tracing my family tree, so this will just add to my knowledge.
I am not rich, so I would want to get the most information for my money.
 

I have.  just got my results recently. It’s

 

On 27/05/2019 at 23:19, El Cid said:

AncestryDNA® can reveal your heritage and connect you to family past and present.

Only £79*
 
Has anyone tried it? I find it interesting, there is also the health side.
What do you get for £79? I have spent £50 plus tracing my family tree, so this will just add to my knowledge.
I am not rich, so I would want to get the most information for my money.
 

Yes me 👋 it’s very interesting to say the least. I’m glad I did it. My gut instinct told me I was right, my mother has a ding dong with some chap in Sheffield. Ins and outs literally I’m not going there 😳 basically I am related to the Harrison’s. I’ve looked there is to many .but half  of them have private settings on, which is understandable . I’m 89% related to Alan nabb &  49% to Peter ryde. Then connections to polly may ryde Harrison’ the dna shows up in green  that connects the ryde and Harrison s but confused with the nabb , but then the nabb has links to the ryde family then to Harrison family.  Some haven’t been on for year. I’ve messaged them just have to wait for reply.  Did you get the dna kit then EL cid ? Did you have any success? Kind regards 

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It is not at all a brick wall, it has opened a lot more doors and a lot more work.

It is not that common for actual named people to appear on your Ancestry test results page.

It is not required for that close relative to have done the test for you to progress in your identification of them.

You will share DNA with common relatives of their generation, the previous and subsequent generations.

However you can begin to build a picture.

Although actual documents are the best and only real guarantee of accuracy, you can get a lot of "possibles" from many sources and eliminate them( it's not good practice and don't put these online- it will confuse future reseach.).

 

Try FreeBMD

Where are the Harrisons? You can search areas/streets on the 1939 register.

Odd or geographical middle names.

Naming patterns.

Telephone books.

Great War and WWII service, pensions and medal records.

Employment records.

School rolls.

Newspapers,

Apprentice, union,  guilds etc.

 

Good luck.

 

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15 hours ago, terri37 said:

👋😳Did you get the dna kit then EL cid ? Did you have any success? Kind regards 

Not done anything yet, money is tight this month. I probably will in the future.

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On 28/05/2019 at 10:01, PeteM01 said:

If you make your test results available to be searched online, there is a good chance that someone will contact you. I have made contact with (or been contacted by) several people based on our DNA similarity. Most turn out to be traceable through family trees and so are genuine cousins. As we have potentially more than 17,000 5th cousins, there are a lot of relations out there somewhere!

 

Not all DNA matches are real, however, so confirmation is always required. I found this online about the probablity of finding matching DNA between 2 cousins:

Relationship 23andMe AncestryDNA Family Tree DNA Family Finder
First cousins 100% 100% 100%
Second cousins 100% 100% >99%
Third cousins 89.7% 98% >90%
Fourth cousins 45.9% 71% >50%
Fifth cousins 14.9% 32% >10%
Sixth cousins 4.1% 11% Remote (typically less than 2%)[2]

So what about Richard III,  his ancestors had DNA tests done to link them to him and that was way further back in 1485, would it count?

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4 hours ago, cressida said:

So what about Richard III,  his ancestors had DNA tests done to link them to him and that was way further back in 1485, would it count?

I don't think Ancestry do this test, but others do:

Y chromosome

Genealogical information showed that all five living male-line relatives of Richard III were descended from Henry Somerset, the 5th Duke of Beaufort and the Y chromosome data for four out of the five male-line relatives showed a match consistent with them being related as expected. However, one of the five had a very different Y chromosome type indicating that a false-paternity had occurred within the last few generations. The Y chromosome type of the Skeleton 1 did not match any of the living male-line relatives showing that a false-paternity event (or events) had also occurred somewhere in the 19 generations between Richard III and Henry Somerset, 5th Duke of Beaufort. This was not a particularly surprising result. Work by Turi King and others has shown that historical rates of false-paternity are around 1-2% per generation.

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The key to any family history research is to start with what you know and prove the facts as you go along. If you have living relatives ask them what they know but, always allow for fanciful stories , sometimes names get mixed up so keep an open mind but, write down everything that anyone tells you.

I spent 20 years trying to find the name of my father's biological father in order to find my own biological surname, no certificates proving he'd been "adopted" but, we're talking 1923 when documented adoptions weren't required. My father had nothing but a Baptism certificate and that was in the name of his "adopted" father.

I finally got a break through when I found a document showing my father being entered into the Sheffield Workhouse as a 6 weeks old baby under one name and then being taken out and given a different name by Baptism and the Workhouse entry clearly said "father of child" so I knew who my paternal grandfather was though I'd suspected but, I had to have proof.

Present day searches are much easier but, always prove as you go and keep an open mind, you'll get there.

 

 

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