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Big Brother Is |Watching Us.

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Posted (edited)

This is a story that I've mentioned on here prior.

 

Perhaps five years ago  one of my friends was investigated by the triple c.  It stands for crime ,corruption commission.

 

Anyway they were privy to information that my friend deduced could only have been obtained from his phone. I am talking about listening or hearing in to my friends conversation when his phone was not in use!

 

It has since been shown this is quite easy to do through the mic in the phone.

 

 

Edited by MAC33

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3 hours ago, Pyrotequila said:

https://uk.pcmag.com/how-to/82734/how-to-get-google-to-quit-tracking-you

 

Follow the instructions to turn off location history tracking, if you're that bothered that Google knows you went to Tesco

It's not the Tesco trips it's the ones to Happy Endings Sauna and the like , that are causing concern with some of the lads.😎

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Posted (edited)
14 hours ago, iansheff said:

Usually I have the data  turned off and am not logged into any local wifi also my GPS is turned off so not sure how it picks up my location.

Base station triangulation, needed for signal routing and hand-off, and which occurs permanently whilever the phone is switched on (even in standby mode), through periodical keep alive signalling. This is so the network knows which tower in the network to route calls/texts through, and gets translated for mere mortals as the network 'bars'.

 

The oldest geolocating method for mobile phones, long (long, long) before phones ever included GPS and/or WiFi (-which is a secondary source of mobile phone geolocation these days, to improve/refine GPS data, especially indoors).

 

Still in use nowadays AFAIK.

 

Most (all?) IOS apps come with an authorisation flag, asking you at install time whether you will allow (push) notifications. Just answer "no" and you shouldn't get spammed by geo/proximity-triggerred notifications. You can also tweak network permissions for each app through the IOS 'settings' menu.

 

Android still looks like the FarWest to me, where app permissions are concerned, so I don't use it.

 

If you *really* don't want to get tracked, just use burners (phones you buy -cash-, use once to call out, then bin immediately after: just (re-)watch the Jason Bourne movies). Rather the expensive solution, but it works...

 

...or (re)learn to live without carting a mobile everywhere with you.

Edited by L00b

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6 hours ago, L00b said:

Base station triangulation, needed for signal routing and hand-off, and which occurs permanently whilever the phone is switched on (even in standby mode), through periodical keep alive signalling. This is so the network knows which tower in the network to route calls/texts through, and gets translated for mere mortals as the network 'bars'.

 

The oldest geolocating method for mobile phones, long (long, long) before phones ever included GPS and/or WiFi (-which is a secondary source of mobile phone geolocation these days, to improve/refine GPS data, especially indoors).

 

Still in use nowadays AFAIK.

 

Most (all?) IOS apps come with an authorisation flag, asking you at install time whether you will allow (push) notifications. Just answer "no" and you shouldn't get spammed by geo/proximity-triggerred notifications. You can also tweak network permissions for each app through the IOS 'settings' menu.

 

Android still looks like the FarWest to me, where app permissions are concerned, so I don't use it.

 

If you *really* don't want to get tracked, just use burners (phones you buy -cash-, use once to call out, then bin immediately after: just (re-)watch the Jason Bourne movies). Rather the expensive solution, but it works...

 

...or (re)learn to live without carting a mobile everywhere with you.

Totally agree on your last sentence, some folks can't go to the toilet these days with clutching their phone. Lol

Sometimes it makes me wonder why phone boxes didn't have massive queues outside every oe of them in the old, pre -mobile days.

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