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Whalley Bridge Incident Overkill?

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Posted (edited)
20 minutes ago, Pettytom said:

I think I’d rather be elsewhere rather than under that reservoir, even if the chances of the dam going are minimal.

 

If it does go, it will be catastrophic. The evacuation is a correct and proportionate response to a serious risk.

Totally agree, because whats the other option? Leave everyone be and keep their fingers crossed? 

 

Edited by nikki-red

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1 minute ago, nikki-red said:

Totally agree, because whats the other option? Leave everyone be and keep their fingers crossed? 

 

Which makes the op in this thread appear rather ridiculous.

 

I know that the “persona” who created the thread did it to be deliberately provocative, but it really is a stupid claim.

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19 minutes ago, Pettytom said:

Which makes the op in this thread appear rather ridiculous.

 

I know that the “persona” who created the thread did it to be deliberately provocative, but it really is a stupid claim.

yup could be like the great sheffield flood

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Sheffield_Flood

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I'm glad some of the armchair experts on here are not running the teams over there, 'Cosmetic damage only' 'if it was going to collapse it would have by now'. some peoples googling knows no bounds.

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4 hours ago, Borista336 said:

is the Whaley bridge Dam incident a little bit of overkill? the concrete outer shell is unlikely to be structural? its the material underneath which is the actual dam wall?

sure take precautions but now its a major logistical nightmare for residents as well, surely instead of the hardcore bags the helicopter is flying in very skillfully i may say, wouldn't it have made sense to pump in quick setting concrete from the side of the dam as a temporary measure? instead of inconveniencing the whole area, if it was going to collapse it would have by now.

1st bold:

 

I think it has to be.

 

Imagine, if they [gov't/authorities] said, 'YES', it's safe to go home, then it collapses?

 

2nd bold:

 

Although I'm not an engineer, and just using my own garden as an example... when it rains heavily, the water subsides, importantly mainly into the ground. Saturation happens if over long period of time.

This is an incredibly old structure too. Who knows how much water has been absorbed into the dam through cracks and pressure.

 

Underlined:

 

Yes, I was also impressed with the precision drops when I saw the news.

 

-

 

My thought,

Looking at footage, if you look around the edges, it's looks higher than what you'd expect something like Ladybower to look like.

I think they'll probably have to drain this and replace it. It's old, and no historical beauty lost. Probably a huge scale job though redirecting pipes to counter the loss of its use.

 

 

 

 

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My novice view on it, if the overflowing water has already ripped out the outer concrete panels it will soon eat away at the soil bank the underlying stuff is made of, if more water overflows it could turn that 30 foot soil bank into 20 / 10 / 0 foot in no time.  The key thing seems to be making sure any overflowing water does not erode that exposed bank anymore hence the temporary bags.

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8 hours ago, alarmingmark said:

Do you mean ulley ?

No he meant Ulley

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12 hours ago, Pettytom said:

Which makes the op in this thread appear rather ridiculous.

 

I know that the “persona” who created the thread did it to be deliberately provocative, but it really is a stupid claim.

wind your neck in mate !t wasnt deliberately provocative its what lots of people have been saying including structural engineers i know.

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42 minutes ago, Borista336 said:

wind your neck in mate !t wasnt deliberately provocative its what lots of people have been saying including structural engineers i know.

It is a bit daft to wonder whether it's an overreaction to move people out of a situation that could produce massive casualties.

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Borista336 said:

wind your neck in mate !t wasnt deliberately provocative its what lots of people have been saying including structural engineers i know.

I’ll decide what I do with my neck, thank you very much.

 

Anyone with any knowledge of risk management can see that the correct response has been made.

 

If your structural engineer mates are real, they should probably consider volunteering for a bit of retraining.

 

 

Edited by Pettytom

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19 minutes ago, Pettytom said:

I’ll decide what I do with my neck, thank you very much.

 

Anyone with any knowledge of risk management can see that the correct response has been made.

 

If your structural engineer mates are real, they should probably consider volunteering for a bit of retraining.

 

 

well if you continue to stick it out it might knocked off one day.

risk management as you call it has become a joke in these days of mass litigation and compensation, everyone covering their backs etc etc.

in any case i have never said it is an over reaction just asked if it was or anyone else thought so? nothing to do with being provocative.

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Check out the Bursting of the Dale Dike dam to see just what could happen to the people of Whaley Bridge.

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