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Compulsory Bicycle Insurance - Yes or No?

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Just now, stifflersmom said:

So whilst the capacity for damage is fairly low, you'd still be happy to use police resource to fine cyclists on the pavement? If you're going to use resource for enforcement, it should be directed at those who have the capacity to cause most damage ( and financial cost). That'll be motorists, specifically the 1 million or so uninsured motorists on the road in the UK. Is compulsory insurance working for them?

It isn't an either or situation as far as Ibak concerned.

 

Uninsured drivers, as well as those driving without a licence should be severely dealt with in my opinion.  Multiple thousand pound fine confiscated from house value or wages/benefits.

 

Whilst the capacity for damage is fairly low, I meant more the financial side of things.  Riding down the Moor on a bike makes pedestrians feel uncomfortable.

 

A hefty fine would help fill the coffers of the police whilst making the area more pleasant for those who want to use the area.

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Alternatively, fix the real problem which is that pedestrians feel uncomfortable sharing space with cycles for some reason.  Given that the risk and consequences are both low to negligible, and that cycling down the moor is a safer route for cyclists, making it officially a shared space (if it isn't already) would seem to be the answer.

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I have cycling insurance as I do alot of cycling on busy roads. I do not think it is necessary for people that are unlikely to cause any serious damage but it is not for me to decide what would constitute  such ability.

 

The riders hazard perception decision led him to not be in a position to stop in time. How many car drivers on a 40 mph road slow down for pedestrians walking on the adjacent pavement or slow down coming up to traffic lights?

 

The majority of car drivers I see look like they struggle to walk to  their cans never mind able to ride a bike and know what its like on the road.  I occasionally use cycle routes but I never ride on the pavement and reluctantly use gutter cycle lanes as the drivers do not give enough passing space. 

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8 minutes ago, Cyclone said:

Alternatively, fix the real problem which is that pedestrians feel uncomfortable sharing space with cycles for some reason.  Given that the risk and consequences are both low to negligible, and that cycling down the moor is a safer route for cyclists, making it officially a shared space (if it isn't already) would seem to be the answer.

I disagree.  I am a very experienced cyclist and I feel uncomfortable sharing pedestrian space with cyclists.

 

Judging you based on your profile pic (the best way to judge people!), you are probably a fairly decent cyclist and one that is aware of the needs of pedestrians.

 

A great number are not. They will ride at speed, no handed, on their phones or doing wheelies.  The better riders tend to ride on the road.

 

The Moor is a pedestrian area and not for bikes (as far as I am aware).  However I am using the Moor to represent all pedestrian areas, could just as well be the pavement on eccy road.

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I tend to ride on the road, but I can see why some cyclists would rather cycle (slowly) down the moor rather than play with the buses down Charter Row.

 

Given that several home secretaries have told cyclists to use the pavement and that the police themselves use the pavement when on bikes, I think that all pavements and pedestrianised areas should be designated shared.  Everyone would quickly get used to the idea, and no additional danger would be created (whilst quite considerable danger would be avoided for some cyclists).

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I personally ride a motorcycle as my main vehicle. However, I feel that it is right for bicycles to not have mandatory insurance. 

 

Motorcycles are cheaper to insure than cars, this makes sense since motorcycles are smaller, weigh far less, cost less etc. You also give up a lot of features that you have in a car, so the insurance drop feels justified to the rider, you legitimately get less so you pay less. 

 

A bicycle doesn't even have an engine, if it hits a vehicle, it's likely only the rider of the bicycle will be affected. I think bicycle/pedestrian incidents are so few and far between that we don't need compulsory insurance as it's more logical to deal with such an issue as a cyclist, if and when it comes to it, if it ever does. 

 

They're so harmless, I can't see why so many motor vehicle users have such an issue with bicycles not being forced to be ripped off as much as we are. We are ripped off so bad but we get the pleasure of an engine to take us around, and in the case of a car, shelter, music etc.

 

I think there's a lot of stupidity surrounding this subject. 

 

People should stay out of matters that don't concern them. If you have never had an issue with cyclists and aren't one yourself, it's an inefficient use of your mental capacity to focus so much on cyclists. Obviously.

 

I'm not a fisherman, I have no involvement with fishermen, therefore I've never found myself worrying about their licenses (which actually are compulsory). 

 

I'm sure this should be simple? As in just not even a discussion. 

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I guess that motorists get frustrated that it's so much quicker for a cycle to get through traffic, and that it makes cyclists fit and attractive whilst they sit in their cars getting fat and ugly (okay, that's tongue in cheek).

What they fail to appreciate is that they're part of the congestion that annoys them, and if a cyclist wasn't on a bike, they'd be in a car most likely and the queues would be even longer!

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From the age of 18  cyclist shoud be compelled to have insurance plus road tax like other road users.  £20 a year at least.  

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1 hour ago, PRESLEY said:

From the age of 18  cyclist shoud be compelled to have insurance plus road tax like other road users.  £20 a year at least.  

So taxed more than a zero VED rated car? Why?

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33 minutes ago, Bargepole23 said:

So taxed more than a zero VED rated car? Why?

Ok! The same as a VED rated car. If your a road user contribute. Plus it only makes sense to get your self covered. :roll:

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I do have insurance, out of a sense of personal responsibility and financial risk mitigation (as noted earlier).

 

What is disturbing about this tale is the societal change  that people don't pay any attention to their surroundings when they're out.

Why would anyone step into a road without looking, and concentrating entirely on something else?  If she'd been hit by a car, would it have still been 50/50 blame?

 

I have to dodge round people as a pedestrian because they're so absorbed in a screen that they can't see someone walking along a pavement in the opposite direction.  People stop in doorways because they can't think that other people may be around in the area and want to pass through the door (just one of my pet hates).

 

Take some personal responsibility for behaviour out in public!!!

 

Though the chap  I saw walk into a bus stop because he was staring at his phone was absolutely hilarious 🤣

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9 hours ago, PRESLEY said:

Ok! The same as a VED rated car.

Lots of cars have a ved rating of zero.

 

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