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Banks to refund some scam victims.

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My bank has phoned me in the past, can't remember what for, but they wanted me to verify my identify first, before getting on to business. I told them first I'd need to verify that they're my bank, and explained my security concerns.

 

Told them to write to me instead.

 

Turns out, it was actually my bank.

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I have three bank accounts and a building society account and not one of them has ever rung me in the many years I’ve been a customer. 

 

I can’t actually think of any reason why they ever would.

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1 minute ago, Top Cats Hat said:

I have three bank accounts and a building society account and not one of them has ever rung me in the many years I’ve been a customer. 

 

I can’t actually think of any reason why they ever would.

Yep, sorry I can't for the life of me remember what it was for now, but it was definitely my bank. I just objected to verifying my own identify (and so revealing some security credentials associated with my account) when I didn't know for sure they were actually my bank.

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31 minutes ago, Top Cats Hat said:

I have three bank accounts and a building society account and not one of them has ever rung me in the many years I’ve been a customer. 

 

I can’t actually think of any reason why they ever would.

My bank has rang me after I've contacted them via social media. 

 

I have a 'special instruction' on my account. If they ring me they have to quote the phrase. This tells me it's the bank. 

 

I don't see why such cannot be made a standard security feature. 

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1 minute ago, Resident said:

If they ring me they have to quote the phrase. This tells me it's the bank. 

What’s the phrase?

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5 minutes ago, Top Cats Hat said:

What’s the phrase?

Nice try

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How are people still falling for this though?

No bank on the planet would text a customer and ask them to transfer all their money into a random account.

 

Watching something about this on Watchdog now and there's an old bloke that got a text from his bank saying his accounts are compromised and to transfer all his cash into some temporary account, and he did it!!!

To me he's just gone on national TV and gone "yeah I'm a moron"

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It's nice to be smug when you haven't been scammed. As someone with painfully recent experience and never thought they'd fall for a scam. Have a little respect. Scams are clever and with the best will we are not always 100% on our guard 24 hours a day 7 days a week. Question all your transactions moving forward,  I know that I will. 

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14 hours ago, Top Cats Hat said:

I have three bank accounts and a building society account and not one of them has ever rung me in the many years I’ve been a customer. 

 

I can’t actually think of any reason why they ever would.

My bank phone me from time to time if they think there's be a potentially fraudulent transaction.

I always tell them I'll call back, and then do so, it's never been fraud, but I'm glad that they have a system to flag odd transactions.

12 hours ago, Pyrotequila said:

How are people still falling for this though?

No bank on the planet would text a customer and ask them to transfer all their money into a random account.

 

Watching something about this on Watchdog now and there's an old bloke that got a text from his bank saying his accounts are compromised and to transfer all his cash into some temporary account, and he did it!!!

To me he's just gone on national TV and gone "yeah I'm a moron"

I read one where the email of a solicitors was hacked, a couple buying a house were then sent "new details" from the solicitors genuine email account to make the transfer for the deposit, or house purchase, they took it at face value as it was a genuine email and transferred the money.  They had a hell of a job getting it back.  I think they did, but only after the newspaper got involved.

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1 hour ago, Cyclone said:

I read one where the email of a solicitors was hacked, a couple buying a house were then sent "new details" from the solicitors genuine email account to make the transfer for the deposit, or house purchase, they took it at face value as it was a genuine email and transferred the money.  They had a hell of a job getting it back.  I think they did, but only after the newspaper got involved.

This one is now getting very popular with people transferring £20,30,40K into a random account from the contents of an email. I'm fairly well off but I wouldn't dream of transferring anywhere near that amount of money on the strength of an email. If you are buying a house you will be in fairly regular contact with your solicitor. How hard is it to just pick up the phone and ring them to confirm the details? After all, it is probably the most amount of money you will ever move in one transaction.

 

Is this a sign of our times where we don't talk to people instead choosing to text/facebook/email each other?

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1 hour ago, Cyclone said:

My bank phone me from time to time if they think there's be a potentially fraudulent transaction.

Lloyds do an automated phone call and follow up text if you set up a new transfer.

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