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25 minutes ago, Cyclone said:

The definition that the government use has been explained multiple times.

"If you say 60% of median income then I'd strongly disagree with the definition."

 

As would most people with any degree of pragmatism.

 

 

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Posted (edited)
On ‎06‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 20:24, Cyclone said:

I think that the Rowntree foundation tries to define it as lacking in things which are considered necessities for life in current society.

So that might include basic level internet access and a bottom end mobile phone, in addition to the very basics that keep you alive, food, warm, accomodation.

They go too far though and start including silly things like foreign holidays, clearly having to have a week in Skegness in a tent because you can't afford to go to europe isn't a definition of poverty that many will agree with, foreign holidays are not a requirement to be part of modern society, they're a requirement to be considered middle class perhaps.

The Rowntree Foundation have various different measures for poverty at different levels, as introduced here.  The one you're probably talking about is "material deprivation" as defined here.  "Materially deprived" means being unable to afford at least three of the 9 things listed, which include holidays (not foreign holidays).

 

The definition of poverty used in the research that the "14 million people in poverty" headlines referred to is discussed at length here and (a bit) more succinctly here.

 

Just in case anybody wants to find out about how "poverty" is actually defined by people who work in the area.

 

Update:  In the most recent definition of the Rowntree Foundation's "minimum income standard" (which is well above the "material deprivation" level) that I've been able to find, they explicitly refer to being able to afford a "one-week annual holiday in the UK", and explicitly exclude foreign holidays.  See the "full report" linked to from here.

Edited by CaptainSwing

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2 hours ago, CaptainSwing said:

The Rowntree Foundation have various different measures for poverty at different levels, as introduced here.  The one you're probably talking about is "material deprivation" as defined here.  "Materially deprived" means being unable to afford at least three of the 9 things listed, which include holidays (not foreign holidays).

 

The definition of poverty used in the research that the "14 million people in poverty" headlines referred to is discussed at length here and (a bit) more succinctly here.

 

Just in case anybody wants to find out about how "poverty" is actually defined by people who work in the area.

 

Update:  In the most recent definition of the Rowntree Foundation's "minimum income standard" (which is well above the "material deprivation" level) that I've been able to find, they explicitly refer to being able to afford a "one-week annual holiday in the UK", and explicitly exclude foreign holidays.  See the "full report" linked to from here.

You're a mighty fine poster Swing, that's a damn fine post.

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On ‎08‎/‎06‎/‎2019 at 07:39, Mister Gee said:

You're a mighty fine poster Swing, that's a damn fine post.

Thanks!  I dug your union cartoon too.

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