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"Twenty-two per cent of those born between 1981 and 2000 are likely to be living in relative poverty in their late twenties – a higher proportion than any previous generation, the Resolution Foundation estimates " (Independent ).

 

No wonder they are glueing themselves to things. 

 

 

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50 minutes ago, petemcewan said:

"Twenty-two per cent of those born between 1981 and 2000 are likely to be living in relative poverty in their late twenties – a higher proportion than any previous generation, the Resolution Foundation estimates " (Independent ).

 

No wonder they are glueing themselves to things. 

 

 

Hmmm... :huh:


... well if they are really living in poverty then I don't think they should waste what little they have buying SuperGlue. :roll:

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Can't be bothered to read the article, or the report. Can the OP post the relevant bits?

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Posted (edited)

Yes just look at those young whippersnappers that glued themselves to Corbyn's fence. Youth has been tough on them...

 

https://www.euronews.com/2019/04/17/climate-change-activist-superglues-himself-to-london-train

 

The chap who glued himself to the train is a Buddhist monk. As such, I think he'd embrace poverty...

 

(People have been gluing themselves to things because of the climate change protests - not to do with poverty.. )  

Edited by Robin-H

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1 hour ago, petemcewan said:

"Twenty-two per cent of those born between 1981 and 2000 are likely to be living in relative poverty in their late twenties – a higher proportion than any previous generation, the Resolution Foundation estimates " (Independent ).

 

No wonder they are glueing themselves to things. 

 

 

Someone born in 1981 (the oldest of the millennial generation) would now be 37 to 38, a long way past their "late twenties".

 

Anyway, how does the Resolution Foundation define "relative poverty"? What are the criteria?

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1 minute ago, WiseOwl182 said:

Someone born in 1981 (the oldest of the millennial generation) would now be 37 to 38, a long way past their "late twenties".

 

Anyway, how does the Resolution Foundation define "relative poverty"? What are the criteria?

See post #3 - I asked a sinilar question, but not quite as directly.😀

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1 hour ago, petemcewan said:

"Twenty-two per cent of those born between 1981 and 2000 are likely to be living in relative poverty in their late twenties – a higher proportion than any previous generation, the Resolution Foundation estimates " (Independent ).

 

 

The key words I get from the above are "Twenty-two per cent"; strange to give such a precise percentage & then follow the statement up with the less precise & definable statement, "Are likely." 

 

As for "A higher proportion than any previous generation."  Hmmmm? 

 

History now only starting at the end of the 20th century then?  We suddenly forgetting about past generations, including our parents & grandparents generations who really knew poverty but just got on with hard work & tried to better themselves without the whining? 

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Nice to see one or two posters on this forum who dare to question the doom-sayers.

 

Thanks, @Baron99.

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41 minutes ago, Baron99 said:

The key words I get from the above are "Twenty-two per cent"; strange to give such a precise percentage & then follow the statement up with the less precise & definable statement, "Are likely." 

 

As for "A higher proportion than any previous generation."  Hmmmm? 

 

History now only starting at the end of the 20th century then?  We suddenly forgetting about past generations, including our parents & grandparents generations who really knew poverty but just got on with hard work & tried to better themselves without the whining? 

You are of course right. 

 

We should re-introduce rickets, polio and diphtheria. Let’s also Have those buggers queueing up for work at 6am, from the gang masters.

 

That’ll teach those millennials. 

 

(Meanwhile, the pensioners and comfortably off middle classes can just carry on gorging themselves on their good fortune to be born at the right time)

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Posted (edited)
35 minutes ago, Pettytom said:

You are of course right. 

 

We should re-introduce rickets, polio and diphtheria. Let’s also Have those buggers queueing up for work at 6am, from the gang masters.

 

That’ll teach those millennials. 

 

(Meanwhile, the pensioners and comfortably off middle classes can just carry on gorging themselves on their good fortune to be born at the right time)

Don't be so stupid with the rickets remark.  It doesn't become you. 

 

Clearly missed the comments that the likes of my parents & grandparents generation & the vast majority of the UK population of those times knew real poverty but as everyone was generally in the same boat, they got on with trying to improve their lot & ensure the next generation had a better chance of succeeding.  I know my parents made sacrifices for me, my brothers & sister for which we will be eternally grateful. 

 

What was also missing from previous generations is the self-pitying industry that's sprung up in the past decade or so, that now employs hundreds, to tell the thousands how badly off they are, not helping to improve their lot but to continue their misery by perpetuating a sense of victimisation. 

Edited by Baron99
Amendments

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This is exactly why people using Relative Poverty to get generate a big headline figure are shooting themselves in the foot.

 

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