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Allegations of rape: Why are police asking victims for their phones?

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You've assumed that what they've said is what they actually do.

 

If you believe everything that the authorities say then you'll continue to be a sucker, as you've demonstrated on a number of occasions on this thread.

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3 hours ago, Cyclone said:

You've assumed that what they've said is what they actually do.

 

If you believe everything that the authorities say then you'll continue to be a sucker, as you've demonstrated on a number of occasions on this thread.

As opposed to drawing opinions on a newspaper headline - there’s only one sucker there I’m afraid.

 

you didn’t read the available information - threw out a load of inaccuracies and when proven wrong resort to just saying “well I don’t believe it”

 

I’ve shown you where you are wrong - I can’t make you believe what’s written in front of you - So I’ll leave this thread now . 

 

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A case highlighted in today's Independent casts doubt over the legitimacy of the police's need to have the rape victim's personal details. After giving evidence to the police they obtained her attacker's DNA, they needed more evidence to charge him. The police presented her with consent forms enabling investigators to access records from her primary and secondary schools, universities, GP and therapists. They also wanted her mobile phone, but she had changed it since her attack.

The victim quite reasonably asks:

“What could they possibly have found in my school history that could have legitimately cast doubt on whether I was raped by a stranger?”

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/rape-victims-phones-medical-records-met-police-cps-a8949636.html

 

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Posted (edited)

I guess that is why the police investigate.   Its the whole point.

 

I'm sure the ALLEGED victim can ask many questions about why they want this and why they need to ask that but doesn't mean its the wrong process.   What about the ALLEGED accused, they have rights to defend their case too.

 

The one sided agenda continually pushed by the media and several campaign groups is wholly unjust.

Edited by ECCOnoob

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1 hour ago, Mister M said:

A case highlighted in today's Independent casts doubt over the legitimacy of the police's need to have the rape victim's personal details. After giving evidence to the police they obtained her attacker's DNA, they needed more evidence to charge him. The police presented her with consent forms enabling investigators to access records from her primary and secondary schools, universities, GP and therapists. They also wanted her mobile phone, but she had changed it since her attack.

The victim quite reasonably asks:

“What could they possibly have found in my school history that could have legitimately cast doubt on whether I was raped by a stranger?”

https://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/rape-victims-phones-medical-records-met-police-cps-a8949636.html

 

I would agree that their school history was irrelevant and can’t see why that would  form a reasonable line of enquiry. 

 

Were the school records accessed? 

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Why would a reported rape by a stranger need her phone either, since you've stated that they'll only ask for it when it's relevant...  This is clear evidence that what they say is not what they do.

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