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Major contribuition to road safety and reducing aggressive driving.

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1 hour ago, Justin Smith said:

Aggressive drivers who kill innocent people are my bugbear subject. TBH I cannot understand why they aren`t everyone`s bugbear subject (excluding selfish immature [under 25 ? ] Petrolheads).

By any reasonable definition speeding is aggressive driving.

To be fair in the last two weeks I've narrowly avoided being crashing into twice, both times it was down to lack of driver attention.

This morning I saw a BMW on the M1, weaving around and not able to stay in it's lane - driver was busy looking down at their phone.

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Reducing speed will mean reducing accidents

Reducing accidents will mean reducing police hours at accidents

reducing police hours at accidents will mean more time for reducing crime

Reducing crime will mean reducing people going to jail

Reducing people going to jail will mean more revenue for the government

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6 hours ago, Justin Smith said:

Aggressive drivers who kill innocent people are my bugbear subject. TBH I cannot understand why they aren`t everyone`s bugbear subject (excluding selfish immature [under 25 ? ] Petrolheads).

By any reasonable definition speeding is aggressive driving.

I don't disagree. I hate the same things. I just think auto speed limiting is a step that needs discussion as you are being forced to behave in a certain manner.

I've pushed for speed cameras / checks in problem areas near us. I'm not a 'ban cameras' type.

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On 29/03/2019 at 14:43, iansheff said:

I wonder what tax the Government will dream up to make up for all the lost revenue created by speeding fines.


a couple of links

https://www.hughjames.com/news/comment/2017/11/cost-of-road-traffic-accidents/

accidents on roads.  cost to the uk  36 billion a year
i cant find accurate figures  but there where 1.2 million  speed camera fines.   so  i doubt the revenue from the fines even scratches the surface 

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Just buy a new car a few months before this comes in. Look after it and service it instead of driving it to destruction like most car owners do, Then bingo, another 15 years+ with a normal car win win. :)

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9 hours ago, Dardandec said:

Just buy a new car a few months before this comes in. Look after it and service it instead of driving it to destruction like most car owners do, Then bingo, another 15 years+ with a normal car win win. :)

How fantastic, you`ve got a car which car exceed the speed limit for 15 years more than all the others, not sure why that`s a win win.

One hopes that if your car can exceed the speed limit you`ll be trying extra hard not to break it, and, even more importantly, not kill or maim anyone else on the roads.

Lastly, one assumes you never complain about speed cameras, because that would be hypocritical in the extreme.

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On 28/03/2019 at 20:25, Padders said:

Not me what says it, motoring organisations ETC. all say it SPEED KILLS.  a clear motorway in good conditions, lulls you into a false sense of security, the worse the conditions the less accidents, people drive accordingly.

The problem with the (incorrect) adage that is that several million people travel in excess of 200mph EVERY SINGLE DAY. Some travel in excess of 1000mph.

Speed as an absolute, with our current propulsion technology does NOT kill.

 

INAPPROPRIATE speed kills but that's not a "sexy sound bite" is it?

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19 hours ago, Resident said:

The problem with the (incorrect) adage that is that several million people travel in excess of 200mph EVERY SINGLE DAY. Some travel in excess of 1000mph.

Speed as an absolute, with our current propulsion technology does NOT kill.

 

INAPPROPRIATE speed kills but that's not a "sexy sound bite" is it?

“Impact speed kills” is better and more accurate.  

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11 minutes ago, DT Ralge said:

“Impact speed kills” is better and more accurate.  

Word it anyway you like, my argument is pure and simple...

If motorists drove at below the speed limit (just under) road deaths would be dramatically reduced.

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14 minutes ago, Padders said:

Word it anyway you like, my argument is pure and simple...

If motorists drove at below the speed limit (just under) road deaths would be dramatically reduced.

Given that most recent statistics show that Speeding is only the 10th most common cause of collisions (in a list of top ten) I say there are more important driving issues to be tackled. 

 

Speeding is just the easiest for authorities to police because all you need is a little yellow box by the side of the road or some wannabe chump who couldn't pass out as a proper copper sat in a van. 

 

Quote

 

 


Using the latest statistics from the Department for Transport, RegTransfers has researched the top causes of road accidents – here is a breakdown of the top 10 that occur in a year throughout Britain:

 

  1. Driver failed to look properly – 42,189 accidents reported
  2. Driver failed to judge other person’s path or speed – 21,211 accidents reported
  3. Driver was careless, reckless or in a hurry – 17,845 accidents reported
  4. Driver had poor turn or maneuver – 15,560 accidents reported
  5. Loss of control – 12,151 accidents reported
  6. Pedestrian failed to look properly – 8,687 accidents reported
  7. Slippery road surface – 7,327 accidents reported
  8. Driver was travelling too fast for conditions – 6,468 accidents reported
  9. Driver was following too close – 6,040 accidents reported
  10. Driver was exceeding speed limit – 5,102 accidents reported

https://www.regtransfers.co.uk/content/common-causes-for-road-accidents-in-britain/

Edited by Resident

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5 minutes ago, Resident said:

Given that most recent statistics show that Speeding is only the 10th most common cause of collisions (in a list of top ten) I say there are more important driving issues to be tackled. 

 

Speeding is just the easiest for authorities to police because all you need is a little yellow box by the side of the road or some wannabe chump who couldn't pass out as a proper copper sat in a van. 

 

https://www.regtransfers.co.uk/content/common-causes-for-road-accidents-in-britain/

Fair enough Resident, I"m no road safety expert, but can you tell me in a RTA which involves a death, what is the most contributory factor.

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48 minutes ago, Padders said:

Fair enough Resident, I"m no road safety expert, but can you tell me in a RTA which involves a death, what is the most contributory factor.

Well, just to be pedantic, no such thing as an RTA anymore but that aside most fatal RTCs are down to dangerous driving with actions such as wrong side of the carriageway, running light controlled junctions at red, driving too fast for conditions (not necessarily over the limit), weaving in and out of lanes causing a loss of control just to name a couple. Speed will always be A factor but not by any means the most contributory in all cases

 

In fact many road deaths at or under the speed limit, usually on NSL B-roads, again due to driving above the speed which conditions dictate. 

 

For instance there's a lovely b-road near me, NSL, sweeping curves. In good conditions with no to light traffic I will happily do the limit. Less than stellar conditions and/or traffic, upto 30% under the limit, sometimes less if conditions are really bad. Sadly many drivers don't think that way. In addition I take very good care of my vehicle, a lot of drivers don't. 

 

I will concede that some of my info may be outdated, it has been a while since I was a volunteer with SYF&R with their Road Safety campaigns, however I cannot see trends will have changed that dramatically.

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