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Consequences of Brexit [part 7] Read first post before posting

mort

 Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute. 

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49 minutes ago, ads36 said:

 

 

If we end up with no deal, we really can't blame the EU.

Watch us try!!!!!

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1 hour ago, ads36 said:

If we end up with no deal, we really can't blame the EU.

That appears to have been the no dealers agenda for a few months now.

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The most likely scenario is a managed no deal.  Even if there is a no deal, then negotiations will start immediately regarding future relationships between the UK and EU.  Brexit is going to happen and the doom and gloomers, who still don't respect the democratic 2016 EU referendum result are going to have to accept it.

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17 minutes ago, Lockdoctor said:

The most likely scenario is a managed no deal.  Even if there is a no deal, then negotiations will start immediately regarding future relationships between the UK and EU.  Brexit is going to happen and the doom and gloomers, who still don't respect the democratic 2016 EU referendum result are going to have to accept it.

A "managed no deal" is still crashing out of the EU to WTO terms however you dress it up.

 

I accepted back in 2016 that we would leave the EU - the result however appears to have been hijacked by the no deal faction to their own ends eg slashing workers rights, environmental protection, health & safety standards etc - not for the good of the country as a whole.

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21 minutes ago, Lockdoctor said:

Even if there is a no deal, then negotiations will start immediately regarding future relationships between the UK and EU.

With the UK economy rapidly going down the pan after a no deal exit, I think ‘negotiations’ is far to strong a word to describe what will basically be an embarrassing begging for any kind of deal to get us out of the mess.

 

The same will of course apply to ‘negotiations’ with other countries outside the EU.

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26 minutes ago, Lockdoctor said:

The most likely scenario is a managed no deal.

The highly respected Institute for Government....

 

"There is no such thing as a ‘managed no deal’ Brexit"

https://www.instituteforgovernment.org.uk/blog/no-such-thing-managed-no-deal-brexit

 

Like all your other daft notions, such as GATT24... not based in reality.

 

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59 minutes ago, Lockdoctor said:

Even if there is a no deal, then negotiations will start immediately regarding future relationships between the UK and EU

 we've had 3 years, and we still can't tell Europe what kind of relationship we want.

 

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42 minutes ago, Longcol said:

A "managed no deal" is still crashing out of the EU to WTO terms however you dress it up.

 

I accepted back in 2016 that we would leave the EU - the result however appears to have been hijacked by the no deal faction to their own ends eg slashing workers rights, environmental protection, health & safety standards etc - not for the good of the country as a whole.

A 'managed no deal' will most likely result in the temporary continuation of the current free trade deal between the UK and EU until a new free trade deal  is agreed.

 

You're spouting nonsense about hijacking.  If there was any hijacking done, it was done by un elected civil servants like Oliver Robbins.  The EU knew when Oliver Robbins and Theresa May were negotiating that the UK were never going to leave the EU by a no deal exit.  The big mistake  was removing no deal from the negotiating table because as anyone with any gumption know, the only way to get a good deal is by being prepared to walk away from a deal.

 

2 minutes ago, ads36 said:

 we've had 3 years, and we still can't tell Europe what kind of relationship we want.

 

That is because the wrong people were doing the negotiating.

Edited by Lockdoctor

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5 minutes ago, Lockdoctor said:

That is because the wrong people were doing the negotiating.

Don’t be ridiculous.

 

The outcome of a negotiation is 95% dependent on the relative strengths of the two sides and only 5% on who is doing the negotiation. The day we triggered Article 50 we put ourself in an incredibly weak position which the EU and everyone else are well aware of.

 

The weakness of the UK’s position has not changed since Johnson replaced May, so how is he going to get anything better in three months than she did in three years when he doesn’t even seem to have a plan?

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23 minutes ago, Lockdoctor said:

You're spouting nonsense about hijacking.  If there was any hijacking done, it was done by un elected civil servants like Oliver Robbins.  The EU knew when Oliver Robbins and Theresa May were negotiating that the UK were never going to leave the EU by a no deal exit.  The big mistake  was removing no deal from the negotiating table because as anyone with any gumption know, the only way to get a good deal is by being prepared to walk away from a deal.

Whose website said (and still does) ;

 

There will be three stages of creating a new UK-EU deal - informal negotiations, formal negotiations, and implementation including both a new Treaty and domestic legal changes. There is no need to rush. We must take our time and get it right.

 

Overall, the negotiations will create a new European institutional architecture that enables all countries, whether in or out of the EU or euro, to trade freely and cooperate in a friendly way. In particular, we will negotiate a UK-EU Treaty that enables us 1) to continue cooperating in many areas just as now (e.g. maritime surveillance), 2) to deepen cooperation in some areas (e.g. scientific collaborations and counter-terrorism), and 3) to continue free trade with minimal bureaucracy."

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25 minutes ago, Top Cats Hat said:

Don’t be ridiculous.

 

The outcome of a negotiation is 95% dependent on the relative strengths of the two sides and only 5% on who is doing the negotiation. The day we triggered Article 50 we put ourself in an incredibly weak position which the EU and everyone else are well aware of.

 

The weakness of the UK’s position has not changed since Johnson replaced May, so how is he going to get anything better in three months than she did in three years when he doesn’t even seem to have a plan?

Why did we trigger Article 50 when we did? 

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3 hours ago, ads36 said:

We've been offered deals.

 

We've been offered something like a Norway deal, we said no - too close a relationship.

 

We've been offered something like a Canada deal, we said no - not close enough.

 

We came up with the withdrawal agreement, as a stepping stone, somewhere to wait while we figure out what we want. The EU agreed, then we voted it down.

 

If we end up with no deal, we really can't blame the EU.

That's the one.

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