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Consequences of Brexit [part 7] Read first post before posting

mort

 Let me make this perfectly clear - any personal attacks will get you a suspension. The moderating team is not going to continually issue warnings. If you cannot remain civil and post within forum rules then do not bother to contribute. 

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2 hours ago, geared said:

 

Yea if we all turn round in 18 months and decide leaving the EU wasn't the best idea it's not like we can simply hop back into the club.

 

But we can and the EU would welcome it. Providing we have another referendum in which the majority of the voters say join and parliament approve it would be easy and quick.

 

 

 

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Just now, apelike said:

But we can and the EU would welcome it. Providing we have another referendum in which the majority of the voters say join and parliament approve it would be easy and quick.

 

 

 

but we wont get as good a deal as we have now

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41 minutes ago, Top Cats Hat said:

If she doesn't  think that it is appropriate to revisit a discredited vote with a marginal result from nearly three years ago...

But who has made out that the vote was discredited except the very people who didn't like the outcome of the first vote.  No matter how marginal the first vote was that was democracy in action.

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1 hour ago, I1L2T3 said:

Bull.

 

Nobody in the EU forced the U.K. to impose £9,500 a year uni fees

 

In fact in many EU countries higher education is still free, or at very low cost.

Didn't Scotland phase out tuition years ago?

 

 

3 minutes ago, apelike said:

But who has made out that the vote was discredited except the very people who didn't like the outcome of the first vote.  No matter how marginal the first vote was that was democracy in action.

Are you talking about the first vote in the 1970's or the second vote three years ago?

Edited by JFKvsNixon

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1 hour ago, I1L2T3 said:

Bull.

 

Nobody in the EU forced the U.K. to impose £9,500 a year uni fees

 

In fact in many EU countries higher education is still free, or at very low cost.

That’s a good point. As a member of the EU, all U.K. students can attend many European universities and pay no tutition fees at all. 

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45 minutes ago, bendix said:

Something which many UK students are availing themselves of, but will no longer be able to when we leave.

 

Another self-inflicted punch in the face.

The governments in the EU aren’t stupid. They will welcome our young people with open arms. Two of my kids are there and despite Brexit they are being treated very well and the support from employers/college is overwhelmingly positive.

 

It’s the UK’s loss

Just now, ez8004 said:

That’s a good point. As a member of the EU, all U.K. students can attend many European universities and pay no tutition fees at all. 

Yes. Or very low fees. One of mine is paying €1000 a year, and the government there even provide a loan for that.

11 minutes ago, apelike said:

But we can and the EU would welcome it. Providing we have another referendum in which the majority of the voters say join and parliament approve it would be easy and quick.

 

 

 

On worse terms

 

We have by far the best deal of any EU member, with many advantageous opt-outs

 

 

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1 hour ago, L00b said:

Except for the small -and entirely logical- bit, that articles about job losses not directly or indirectly attributable to Brexit are not included in the data.

Many local councils have been included citing job losses and yet those very councils have been suffering from government cuts for over 8 years. That data has been included as other data has because the author recons that austerity should have ended but because of Brexit it has been extended so those job losses are of course been because of Brexit.

 

The data and the way it has been used is very suspect.

 

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20 minutes ago, JFKvsNixon said:

Are you talking about the first vote in the 1970's or the second vote three years ago?

I was replying to TCH who stated that may was afraid to hold a second vote. BTW the vote in 1975 was about continuing to be a member of the common market (EEC).  The vote 3 years ago was about the EU after the Mastrict Treaty was signed which made it a different organisation.

Edited by apelike

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24 minutes ago, apelike said:

No matter how marginal the first vote was that was democracy in action.

A marginal vote that was influenced by outside interference on behalf of one side of the argument is actually a travesty of democracy.

Edited by Top Cats Hat

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2 minutes ago, Top Cats Hat said:

A marginal vote that was influenced by outside interference on behalf of one side of the argument is actually a travesty of democracy.

Show the proof of that then, and I do mean proof and not speculation about what may have occurred.

 

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14 minutes ago, apelike said:

Many local councils have been included citing job losses and yet those very councils have been suffering from government cuts for over 8 years. That data has been included as other data has because the author recons that austerity should have ended but because of Brexit it has been extended so those job losses are of course been because of Brexit.

 

The data and the way it has been used is very suspect.

 

And I have very clearly acknowledged those entries open to counter-argument, such as those Council jobs, and pointed you to those entries which can only be directly or indirectly related to Brexit, with reasons given as trade barriers and/or EU relocation.

 

You can take issue with the inclusion of the earlier ones, but you don't get to broad-brush away the later ones under the pretext that the earlier ones are included, when the granularity of the data, i.e. the reasons for each set of job losses, clearly allows you to distinguish between them.

 

Now then, with Brexit preparations running at £800m per week in the UK, shall we talk about the continually-postponed deficit removal that shoukd have happened by 2017 (or 2019, can't remember off hand)...or the £350m per week to the NHS? ;)

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The speaker has ruled the brexit deal cannot be voted on again.

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