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help with b/b router set up

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Posted (edited)

My b/b fibre was installed by Open Reach several years ago.

It consists of a double socket where the phone line comes into the house.

A cable comes from the phone  socket to a DSL plug in an Open Reach  box.

From  a LAN1 socket in that box a cable goes to a socket in the router (I don't know what the socket is called).

Now I am changing my supplier and they have sent me a router and instructions on installation.

These instructions  are different  from the description above.

 

The cable from the double socket goes straight into the DSL socket in the router.

An ethernet cable connects the router to the computer to  connect to the internet.

The Open Reach box is not used at all.

Can someone explain why and what its purpose is/was?

Forgot to mention that both the Open Reach box and the router are connected to power sockets

 

 

Edited by davyboy

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The Open Reach boxes are part of an old setup.

 

They're a fibre modem which could either support just the one wired device, or could be connected to a separate router for multiple devices and wireless.

 

As time has passed technology has shrunk, and routers now tend to have modems built in to them.

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Thank you Neo.

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Also the modern  open reach main box  does not now require any filters anywere  

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Posted (edited)
On 15/03/2019 at 11:37, spider1 said:

Also the modern  open reach main box  does not now require any filters anywere  

Not strictly true, there are two faceplates for the modern NTE5C.

Edited by pearlt072

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My openreach box was fitted by an open reach engineer 6 months ago and he told me to take all filters off . So was my friend who lives half a mile away he told her the same be it a different engineer no need for filters on  new box 

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What I'm saying is, not all new installs have the filtered face plate.  The standard one still requires a filter, and typically speaking the filtered plates (SSFP) are fitted only on a managed install. 

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Posted (edited)

According to a friend of mine who is an installer for B. T. all new boxes he fits no longer need filters in sheff area for last 12 months 

It seems to me to fit otherwise as well be stupid whats the point 

 

 

Edited by spider1

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SSFP

 

Standard face plate.

 

 

If your friend is fitting the SSFP on all installs, then that's between the engineer and his manager to discuss.  The standard face plate should be fitted, unless as part of a managed install, SFI, SFVA or BOOST task.  There are other scenarios.

 

It's worth bearing in mind, I'm not trying to argue with you, just pointing out to other people who may read this that not ALL of the new NTEs are filtered.

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1 minute ago, pearlt072 said:

SSFP

 

Standard face plate.

 

 

If your friend is fitting the SSFP on all installs, then that's between the engineer and his manager to discuss.  The standard face plate should be fitted, unless as part of a managed install, SFI, SFVA or BOOST task.  There are other scenarios.

 

It's worth bearing in mind, I'm not trying to argue with you, just pointing out to other people who may read this that not ALL of the new NTEs are filtered.

i know he fits a lot for sky so maybe were the misunderstanding comes in but it would still seem pointless to fit boxes that require a filter or is that b. t. managers being stupid about norm 

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To be honest, it depends.  I personally find the new MK4 SSFP to be less reliable than the standard plates.  If the filter in the plate fails (and they do occasionally), the customer is left with a filter dangling from the test point, with no easy way to source a replacement face plate.

 

The standard face plates have a smaller footprint, which is useful if cupboards, units etc are pushed close to the socket.

 

It also goes without saying the SSFPs are more expensive than the standard sockets (guess which one Openreach would rather the engineers fit)

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Posted (edited)

I fit both types, the filtered face-plates from a tech's pov are bit, fragile,  in the way they fit. It's a slotted fitting. The pre 2018's at least have the 20mm screws holding everything together. I know another tech, he prefers to actually remove the plastic pushdowns inside and terminate straight onto the IDC type connection left behind. Yes the new ones look nicer and more streamline, but one flick of a vacuum cleaner and they release.

 

All you need to do Davyboy, is leave the cable that goes from the BT socket to the BT fiber box connected to the Faceplate, unplug it from the fiber box. Remove everything else pertaining to the old BB setup. On the back of the new router there will be ONE socket that is correct size for the RJ11 (router to bt) lead. Don't plug the router cable into one of the 4 (there's usually 4) network sockets on the back of the router. It will physically fit but you will see a Network socket is larger than the BB connection socket. That's all you have to do really.

Edited by walkertelecoms

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