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Parking meters being removed?

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1 hour ago, Lockjaw said:

Hang on.

 

So, if the machine was, say 20 minutes fast (unlikely, I know) so my ticket bought at midday said it expired at 1:20, if the CEOs visted my car at 1:15 I'd get a fine?

 

IE, is it ten minutes grace on the stated time on the ticket or on the hour since the ticket was actually purchased?

Technically if you stay longer than the period you've paid for (ie an hour), they are entitled to issue a penalty. It's up to you to make sure you are back by the time your paid period has expired.

 

If a penalty was issued in the circumstances you describe and you appealed, an adjudicator (who decides appeals) might have some sympathy for you, but I'm not sure what the outcome would be, as they will be able to evidence that you have actually overstayed.

 

I'm not sure how Sheffield's CEO's actually deal with that scenario, maybe you should ask them, drop them a line at parkingservices@sheffield.gov.uk

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15 minutes ago, Planner1 said:

Technically if you stay longer than the period you've paid for (ie an hour), they are entitled to issue a penalty. It's up to you to make sure you are back by the time your paid period has expired.

 

If a penalty was issued in the circumstances you describe and you appealed, an adjudicator (who decides appeals) might have some sympathy for you, but I'm not sure what the outcome would be, as they will be able to evidence that you have actually overstayed.

 

I'm not sure how Sheffield's CEO's actually deal with that scenario, maybe you should ask them, drop them a line at parkingservices@sheffield.gov.uk

Technically, maybe, but surely contract law would apply here. 

 

If the machine issues me with a ticket which states I am entitled to park until a specified time then that must constitute a contract.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Lockjaw said:

Technically, maybe, but surely contract law would apply here. 

 

If the machine issues me with a ticket which states I am entitled to park until a specified time then that must constitute a contract.

 

 

 

You always have the option to resort to civil law if you wish, but surely your contract is to buy a specified period of parking time for the stated fee. If you overstay, that's your look out. That might be mitigated by the machine clock being inaccurate, but, you could argue that it's a machine like any other and can be expected to go wrong occasionally.  It's your responsibility to get back before our time expires and there is of course a telephone payment system / app which helps you with that by giving you reminders and letting you extend your time. I'd suspect the CEO would no ticket unless the time on the ticket had passed, but I don't know that for sure.

 

I wouldn't recommend resorting to civil law on a parking ticket. There are cases of people who took the local authority to the high court and lost and had to sell their home to pay the costs.

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17 minutes ago, Planner1 said:

You always have the option to resort to civil law if you wish, but surely your contract is to buy a specified period of parking time for the stated fee. If you overstay, that's your look out. That might be mitigated by the machine clock being inaccurate, but, you could argue that it's a machine like any other and can be expected to go wrong occasionally.  It's your responsibility to get back before our time expires and there is of course a telephone payment system / app which helps you with that by giving you reminders and letting you extend your time. I'd suspect the CEO would no ticket unless the time on the ticket had passed, but I don't know that for sure.

 

I wouldn't recommend resorting to civil law on a parking ticket. There are cases of people who took the local authority to the high court and lost and had to sell their home to pay the costs.

Since I generally use the telephone payment system this is largely irrelevent to me but I'm sure that contract law would apply and that, if the council gives me a ticket, albeit by proxy,  which states I am allowed to park until, for instance,  12:40 then they would have great difficulty justifying a fine applied because I am still there at 12:35.  My suspicion is that the CEOs probably use so-called common sense and work to the time on the ticket if the clock is fast (not so if it is slow).

 

If that turns out to be not the case then it would transpire that Ivan Edake was correct after all, though not for the reason he thought.

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On 14/02/2019 at 11:26, Lockjaw said:

I did work it out; hence my post.

 

Say you arrive at the meter at 11:15 but its clock is 10 minutes fast. 

 

The clock says 11:25. 

 

If you pay for an hour your ticket will say that it expires at 12:25.

 

Therefore, you get an extra ten minutes for your hour fee.

 

If the clocks are fast you get more time for your money.

 

I was working it out this way.Say when you arrive your watch says 11.15 and the clock says 11.30 and you don't check the times.If you pay for an hour the ticket will show 12.30 expiry time. If you then arrive back at 12.30 by your own watch you will collect a parking ticket .because the clock will show 12.45.

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