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M1 north meadowhall, traffic lights

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1 minute ago, geared said:

I remember the traffic at J36 on the M1 used to flow better before they stuck loads of lights on it as well.

There are some junctions that require traffic lights, just to let traffic onto the roundabout, due to traffic flow. But the vast majority don't and roundabouts as a general rule seem to work better than traffic light junctions. There are some exceptions of course - but I do know of one roundabout which has been left without lights as the modelling that was done showed it would make things worse. That is Parkgate Roundabout at the A633/A6123 junction in Rotherham (DFS/Aldi/ASDA).

 

Thankfully Rotherham Council don't appear to be like Sheffield Council and stick traffic lights up in every possible location.

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These better flows that some of you are claiming, are they are peak or off-peak periods?

 

I could understand it off-peak, especially at night but at peak periods I think that would be difficult to achieve.

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On 10/01/2019 at 11:42, Michael_N said:

But the vast majority don't and roundabouts as a general rule seem to work better than traffic light junctions.

Roundabouts work fine when the traffic flows are balanced on all approaches. Where flows are heavily tidal, which is often the case at peak times, one flow of traffic can become dominant and cause delays on other approaches, which is why it is sometimes necessary to signalise roundabouts.

 

Roundabouts also tend to take up more space than a traffic signal junction (because the approaches have to deflect at an angle at the roundabout), which is often a reason why a signal junction is the preferred solution. 

 

Traffic signals also allow the highway authority to control the signal timings remotely in order to manage traffic delays or balance flows. All of Sheffield's traffic signals are connected to an urban traffic control computer which automatically changes the timing plans at individual junctions and can implement area-wide traffic management strategies at busier times. operators can also intervene directly when there's a problem and implement a different timing plan or control traffic directly.

 

Traffic signals of course also give vulnerable road users such as pedestrians, cyclists and equines, priority over other road users. They also provide facilities for blind and partially sighted pedestrians via rotating tactile buttons located under the push button unit, or bleepers (where suitable), which tell them when to cross. 

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lights are now back on and complete gridlock, i think SCC are punishing us for a week of bliss !

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On ‎11‎/‎01‎/‎2019 at 11:59, Weredoomed said:

These better flows that some of you are claiming, are they are peak or off-peak periods?

 

I could understand it off-peak, especially at night but at peak periods I think that would be difficult to achieve.

Peak times for me, I live in Barnsley and work in Sheffield so I'm hitting the area in the normal full on rush hour 

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On 16/01/2019 at 09:40, martin6 said:

lights are now back on and complete gridlock, i think SCC are punishing us for a week of bliss !

It's been shocking again since the lights went back on, I really don't understand how they choose which junctions to light control because this one worked so much better without the lights.

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