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Advice sought on purchasing freehold from sheff council

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Since dad passed away some years ago, I have been running the household for my mum in S2 in a terraced house. The Council sends an annual invoice for the ground rent of £2 every year. I would like to purchase the freehold, but am not sure where to start.

 

I am going to try and find the leasehold details, as I would hazard a guess that lease duration is something close to 100 years.   If the house was built early 20th century, we might be 10 years into a 100-year lease maybe?  I need to go fact finding.  Nevertheless, any advice much appreciated!

 

(I now live in Birmingham and so popping into somewhere in Sheffield isn't practical unfortunately, so I am trying to manage this online/via the phone)

 

MANY thanks :)

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9 minutes ago, mafya said:

Thanks - that link "outlines the qualification requirements for a tenant to buy the freehold of their leasehold house it also gives an outline of the procedure."

However it does provide an advice guide on " Valuation for buying the freehold of a leasehold house", which I will take a look at.

 

Just now, Shafeeq said:

Thanks - that link "outlines the qualification requirements for a tenant to buy the freehold of their leasehold house it also gives an outline of the procedure."

However it does provide an advice guide on " Valuation for buying the freehold of a leasehold house", which I will take a look at.

 

It just dawned on me, as the house owner we would be the tenant - oops!   Note to self, think before posting quickly!!

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28 minutes ago, Shafeeq said:

Thanks - that link "outlines the qualification requirements for a tenant to buy the freehold of their leasehold house it also gives an outline of the procedure."

However it does provide an advice guide on " Valuation for buying the freehold of a leasehold house", which I will take a look at.

 

It just dawned on me, as the house owner we would be the tenant - oops!   Note to self, think before posting quickly!!

Wow.  This is complex.  I need professional advice...!

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I think that you do need professional advice, if only because when you buy a freehold from the council you have to agree to a covenant which permits the council to still levy a 'freeholder ground rent' fee.  I've just had to do similar in buying a house that was previously a council house.

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42 minutes ago, medusa said:

I think that you do need professional advice, if only because when you buy a freehold from the council you have to agree to a covenant which permits the council to still levy a 'freeholder ground rent' fee.  I've just had to do similar in buying a house that was previously a council house.

Many thanks for the info - much appreciated :)

 

Do you have any suggestions of who to turn to, or recommend anyone?

 

Thanks!

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3 minutes ago, Shafeeq said:

Many thanks for the info - much appreciated :)

 

Do you have any suggestions of who to turn to, or recommend anyone?

 

Thanks!

Apologies, I did it as part of selling and buying houses so it was a small part of a larger legal thing for me so I can't point you at anybody.  I would have thought that any property lawyer worth their salt could give you specific advice, along with costs of being represented in such things though.

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You can buy a copy of the property title for your post code address from  Land Registry Online to download and pay by credit card costing £3.  This should show the starting date of lease and the unexpired term remaining on the lease .   Is your lease for  100 years  at £2 ground rent  ( unlikely )  or 900 years ?

 

You can download a free guide to buying the "freehold title"  for a leasehold house  from www.lease-advice.org . Also another guide which gives example of the cost to pay for buying the freehold title.

 

If you want to seek  paid professional advice , you can  consider  the solicitor who contributes to this forum.

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11 minutes ago, topflat29 said:

You can buy a copy of the property title for your post code address from  Land Registry Online to download and pay by credit card costing £3.  This should show the starting date of lease and the unexpired term remaining on the lease .   Is your lease for  100 years  at £2 ground rent  ( unlikely )  or 900 years ?

 

You can download a free guide to buying the "freehold title"  for a leasehold house  from www.lease-advice.org . Also another guide which gives example of the cost to pay for buying the freehold title.

 

If you want to seek  paid professional advice , you can  consider  the solicitor who contributes to this forum.

Top drawer response, topflat - appreciated :)

 

Will need to find the person you're referring to - I think I did see a post from him.

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22 hours ago, topflat29 said:

You can buy a copy of the property title for your post code address from  Land Registry Online to download and pay by credit card costing £3.  This should show the starting date of lease and the unexpired term remaining on the lease .   Is your lease for  100 years  at £2 ground rent  ( unlikely )  or 900 years ?

 

You can download a free guide to buying the "freehold title"  for a leasehold house  from www.lease-advice.org . Also another guide which gives example of the cost to pay for buying the freehold title.

 

If you want to seek  paid professional advice , you can  consider  the solicitor who contributes to this forum.

Further info:

 

"Term : 499 years from 29 September 1871
Rent : £6.0s.10d
NOTE: The lease comprises also 2 and 4 Xxxxxxx Rd"

 

So it is a)very long term and b)incorporates neighbouring adjacent properties, hence £6/year being divided by 3.

 

I am guessing here that I should forget the whole thing in the light of the facts? And look to set up a direct debit of £2/year to the council...

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On 12/27/2018 at 6:54 PM, medusa said:

when you buy a freehold from the council you have to agree to a covenant which permits the council to still levy a 'freeholder ground rent' fee.  I've just had to do similar in buying a house that was previously a council house.

No. If one purchases the freehold reversion to one's leasehold house ("enfranchisement"), the ground rent ceases at once.

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Got an update from the council, which really surprised me.  They are saying it will cost me £1,150. No thanks, I would rather pay £2/year!!

 

 

Dear Shafeeq

The initial step required for your client is to serve a Notice to Acquire the Freehold (Form 1), as per The Leasehold Reform Act 1967. 

 

The notice contains information that is essential to the completion of the freehold valuation. The Leasehold Advisory Service is quite useful for such matters and can be accessed via https://www.lease-advice.org/

 

Should you qualify and wish to continue with the purchase, in addition to the cost of the acquisition they will be  expected to pay the City Council’s charges on completion. 

 

These are as follows:

 

Legal and Surveyor’s fee            £1000.00

Cost of plans (if required)            £150.00

 

I hope the above has been of some assistance to you.

 

Please do not hesitate to contact me, should you have any further queries.

 

Kind Regards,

 

Regeneration and Property Services

City Growth Department 

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