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Racism within sheffield

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We are getting a bit serious about this, sometimes it means something but many times it don't.

Which and under what circumstances you identify yourself with is a moveable feast.

Tebbits 'cricket' test was a classic. He didn't ask  the 'football' test. He didn't ask the music test. There will be different answers to all these depending on the individual. I know a local licensee who loves rugby and supports anyone of the 6 nations. He has grounds to claim membership,  by marrage, domicile and  ancestry, to every one. His choice varies from game to game and often from  score to score.

Rory McIlroy got well and truely snookered with the Irish test.

You can bet that when many return to their ancestral home countries they support Europe for golf, Britain for athletics, England for football and maybe music.

 

Edited by Flanker7

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5 minutes ago, Cyclone said:

It's unlikely to be something that comes up in casual conversation and if it does someone is probably asking you about your ethnic heritage, so answer English just gets you "yeah, but where are you FROMMM?" question in response.

So it's unlikely to have any impact on social integration IMO.

 

So if you're white and said English it would be ok, but if non-white and said English you'd get "but where FROM"? Isn't that racism?

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Just now, WiseOwl182 said:

So if you're white and said English it would be ok, but if non-white and said English you'd get "but where FROM"? Isn't that racism?

What if you talk funny or have ginger hair or narrow eyes are all those racist too?

I talk funny but not by much. It take about five minutes for strangers to suss it out and then I get the "but where you from' question.

I don't think its racist . In fact its a bit of a conversation starter. Of course if you see racism everywhere you could call it racist.

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39 minutes ago, WiseOwl182 said:

Do you think wanting to disassociate yourself with the country you were born in (and its people by implication) and your official nationality will (a) help with social integration or (b) hinder social integration?

 

 

I think you're reading far too much into it frankly. If my neighbour describes himself as Pakistani and he was born here, so what?

He's a good neighbour, has a job, pays his taxes and takes care of his family - I couldn't care less if he calls himself Colombian and I can't understand why it bothers you so much.

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3 hours ago, WiseOwl182 said:

So if you're white and said English it would be ok, but if non-white and said English you'd get "but where FROM"? Isn't that racism?

Bordering on it isn't it.  But that's not from the people you're criticising, they avoid the awkward conversation perhaps by just saying that they're Pakistani, or Chinese or African, to avoid someone asking.

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3 hours ago, Halibut said:

I think you're reading far too much into it frankly. If my neighbour describes himself as Pakistani and he was born here, so what?

He's a good neighbour, has a job, pays his taxes and takes care of his family - I couldn't care less if he calls himself Colombian and I can't understand why it bothers you so much.

arnt you an inquisitive person Halibut, if a person disassociates him/herself  from his/her nationality its onley natural to wonder why. wouldnt you think  

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I wonder why some people insist that they're English and not British, it's all very suspicious.

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14 minutes ago, Cyclone said:

I wonder why some people insist that they're English and not British, it's all very suspicious.

Maybe they're born in England?

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22 hours ago, makapaka said:

Have you thought about why it bothers you that other people decide to identify differently to you yet? 

Flag not St. George’s day.

welll even so the flag is not racist at  all 

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4 hours ago, ormester said:

welll even so the flag is not racist at  all 

I’m not saying it is - your link didn’t support your argument though.

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9 hours ago, WiseOwl182 said:

Do you think wanting to disassociate yourself with the country you were born in (and its people by implication) and your official nationality will (a) help with social integration or (b) hinder social integration?

 

Where do you draw the line? In the North of England, many will have Viking ancestry. Do they define themselves as British Norwegian? Why not? At what point is it accepted that you become the nationality of the country you live in? 1 generation? 10 generations?  It is unlikely that anyone can trace their ancestry back entirely to one single country only, therefore there has to be another definition for nationality.

 

 

Why does what nationality people decide on matter so much to you? 

 

What are you afraid of? 

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6 hours ago, makapaka said:

Why does what nationality people decide on matter so much to you? 

 

What are you afraid of? 

Who said I'm "afraid"? You're putting words in my mouth there.

 

You hit the nail on the head with "decide". You can't just "decide" what nationality you are. If someone is born in Britain and especially if their parents were too, then they're British, by legal and logical definition.

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