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Rehoming a Greyhound

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I'm considering rehoming a Greyhound. I'm 80% confident one would be OK for us. we are a couple approaching 70yrs old but fit and capable. Are these dogs destructive when left alone for a couple of hours ?? Are muzzles necessary ?? If anyone has any experiences they are willing to share I would very much appreciate it.

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I'm considering rehoming a Greyhound. I'm 80% confident one would be OK for us. we are a couple approaching 70yrs old but fit and capable. Are these dogs destructive when left alone for a couple of hours ?? Are muzzles necessary ?? If anyone has any experiences they are willing to share I would very much appreciate it.

 

I suppose it depends on the dog. I only clicked on here because I thought someone wanted to re-home one. After nearly 20 years of being a dog free home we have bought a labradoodle bitch. In my opinion after having greyhounds before they are the most sweet, loving breed there is.

 

Sorry not to be more help

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Generally speaking, ex-racers are very chilled little couch potatoes as long as they get a couple of walks a day, as they have been brought up in kennels so they're quite used to being left alone. Clearly there are exceptions to this, but be guided by the organisation you're talking to, as they do tend to know their dogs.

 

When it comes to muzzles and risks to other animals, it all depends on whether the dog is an ex-racer and their individual prey drive.

 

The law states that all ex-racers, who are trained to chase anything that moves, have to be muzzled and on a lead at all times when out. For other greyhounds this would be merely a precaution until you're sure that they're not going to try to eat the next passing shihtzu. I don't know if exceptions can be made, such as with age, but every greyhound rescue will be able to inform you of your legal obligations as far as that goes.

 

How your walk your dog and how you allow him/her to interact with other dogs and other animals will be affected by being a sighthound (that's the class of very long legged pursuit dogs that hunt by sight, including greys, whippets, Afghans, salukis and their crosses which are all generally called lurchers) so if you haven't had a sighthound before you do need to take that into account.

 

Very few sighthounds are considered safe to be off a lead when out in the open because they are so easy to distract by things that move. An interesting bit of something white being blown on a breeze can make them run into roads, and a seriously fast hound spotting a squirrel or cat can very much be a danger to that small animal. On top of that there's the risk that they can injure themselves very badly, taking in 1000s of vet bills if, for instance they put a foot in a rabbit hole when they're in full flight, or make you liable for an enormous legal bill if they were to cause a car crash by dashing out into a road.

 

For that reason you will be advised to only ever allow them off a lead in an open space if you can control access and potential escape from that space. Lots of sighthound groups hire outdoor tennis courts, basketball courts and maneges to allow a whole group of dogs to be let off and have a lovely chasing game for half an hour.

 

I'm a home checker for Sheffield Dog Rescue, and whenever I am asked to check someone for a sighthound the questions are the same as for other dogs (whose job is it to get up in the night if the dog is sick? what plans do you make for holiday times? have you planned for a safe way for the dog to travel in the car, with a harness or safe bed? etc) but with an added set about how the new owner plans to walk with their dog, how often and where.

 

A greyhound is not your sort of dog if you walk for 3 hours through the Peak District come fair weather or foul, because many greys will refuse to leave their sofa if it's raining or cold and very few of them will walk that sort of distance. I used to take my lovely German Shepherd Molly on home checks with me and she was from a working breed, but greys are generally thought of as a lounging breed :)

 

I'm sure that lots of greyhound specialists will be able to add things, but I'm glad that you're learning now before getting the dog :)

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I would have thought an ideal dog for an older couple, as they require little exercise and are quiet, but get advice from the rehoming people - think there is a greyhound rehoming group in Sheffield.

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Euclid11 - you might already know about Greyhound Rescue South Yorkshire and TIA. If you haven’t done it already, perhaps you might want to discuss your requirements with their helpers. If you are near S8, it might be useful to call in at Bradway pet shop because IIRC the proprietor has some involvement with one of the rescues.

 

Greyhounds seem to look relaxed and easy to get on with but maybe a bit risky to let them off the lead.

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A friend of mine has just had to have her adored greyhound put to sleep. He was an ex racer, sweet boy he lived to be 10, but I think they had him for about 6 years. Another friend also had one, again a lovely gentle boy and an ex racer and prolific winner. Sadly she only had him for about 2 1/2 years he had cancer of the spleen. I think I am right in saying 'long backed' dogs are often not long livers, second friends dog was only about 6 1/2. Like any rescue dog you take a chance, put they do make grand pets. Good luck!!

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Wasn't the screen wife of "I don't believe it" a greyhound rescuer and she said they were lovely calm animals who were happy to be "at rest" as often as possible.

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I have never had a pure bred Greyhound but have had quite a few lurchers with Greyhound in the mix, a couple of which have been worked before.

 

Generally speaking the more Greyhound the more calm the dog, whippet mix tends to be high energy.

 

If the Greyhound is a ex racer I would play it by ear, you will get to know your dog, be choosy to make sure that you get the right dog for you, young Greyhounds can be lively, after 4 they become couch potatoes...I would start out with a muzzle and see how things go, re call can be a problem so until you are sure that you have his attention its best to only allow them off lead in a safe gated and fenced area, any good Greyhound rehoming centre will tell you all of this anyway.

 

They are not normally destructive in my experience at all, tend to sleep for hours after their walk, generally quite undemanding, loving, loyal and sensitive dogs that like to please you, they do not like to sleep on the floor :hihi: and like home comforts.

 

I would think that a greyhound would be a lovely dog for you tell us if you do it :)

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Give Sheffield Retired Greyhounds a call and arrange to go up and see them, when we were looking at possibly adopting a Greyhound we did exactly this and they were very helpful and informative

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The law states that all ex-racers, who are trained to chase anything that moves, have to be muzzled and on a lead at all times when out. For other greyhounds this would be merely a precaution until you're sure that they're not going to try to eat the next passing shihtzu. I don't know if exceptions can be made, such as with age, but every greyhound rescue will be able to inform you of your legal obligations as far as that goes.

 

As a greyhound owner and professional dog walker, I'd be very interested in where this law you refer is! It's the first time I've heard such a thing. Our rescue greys are extremely placid, small dog-friendly and will lap up two hour walks come rain or shine.

 

EUCLID11 Please do take a look at GRSY if you're seriously considering rehoming one of these majestical dogs! They're a small rescue run solely by unpaid volunteers who have put their heart and soul into saving as many greys as they can.

 

https://www.grsy.co.uk/

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I have three retired racers at home. They all have very different characters. Any reputable re-homing organisation will spend time making sure that you are matched with the greyhound for you - and will take the time to do so, including home visits and visits to the homing kennels. I heartedly recommend Greyhound Rescue South Yorkshire GRYSY.

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