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I have never had an unspayed bitch before so I’m unsure what is natural.Do they resume spotting after apparently having stopped?

She’s 10 months and it’s her first season.

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Its about as predictable as a humans period. My rescued dog has just finished hers (shes 5 & half) and it was pretty much as you've described. But they aren't always.

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Remember to leave it 12 weeks before getting her spayed. It may be worth getting her booked in for the op though to prevent her missing the best time for it to be done and then having to endure another season.

 

I asked the vet if they did 2 for 1 when I booked my rescue dog in...would be lovely to be free of all that messing about :-)

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One of my local vets doesn't have an issue with 12 weeks apparently or even the season, we still waited with our rescue who came to us in April but can't be done until December.

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One of my local vets doesn't have an issue with 12 weeks apparently or even the season, we still waited with our rescue who came to us in April but can't be done until December.

 

That's not good at all! There are a number of reasons vets say to wait 12 weeks after the season to be spayed, the fact they don't do this would lead me to question using them.

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It must be a common enough occurrence 'cos even the breeder i rescued her from stated the same thin and they were in Leicester.

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That's not good at all! There are a number of reasons vets say to wait 12 weeks after the season to be spayed, the fact they don't do this would lead me to question using them.

 

Down to the blood flow around the relevant organs isn't it?

The further away from a season it is the lower the blood flow and lower the surgical risk.

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Down to the blood flow around the relevant organs isn't it?

The further away from a season it is the lower the blood flow and lower the surgical risk.

 

Yes that is one of the reasons, with the heightened blood supply there is a much higher risk of haemorrhage also the hormones related to the bitch being in season need to settle down before removing the reproductive organs, and there is also the risk of phantom pregnancies a few weeks after a season so sudden changes in the hormones due to surgery at this stage is very unfair on them, and if there was a phantom pregnancy occurring and the operation took place the enlarged milk glands would make it much more difficult for the spay wound to heal.

 

It's standard practice for these reasons to spay at the correct time.

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The whole 12 weeks thing is dependent on the dog too anyway. Molly came into season again just 11 weeks after her previous one finished (verified by the vet as not being pyometra) for her second season, and again for her third season 12 weeks after that. Because of this our vet took the decision that waiting for 12 weeks was in itself dangerous if the dog was going to almost be back in season again, so she was spayed on 6 weeks as a balance of the risks, including the risk of having way too many seasons potentially being something hormonal and badly balanced. She was watched carefully for bleeding and all was fine.

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The whole 12 weeks thing is dependent on the dog too anyway. Molly came into season again just 11 weeks after her previous one finished (verified by the vet as not being pyometra) for her second season, and again for her third season 12 weeks after that. Because of this our vet took the decision that waiting for 12 weeks was in itself dangerous if the dog was going to almost be back in season again, so she was spayed on 6 weeks as a balance of the risks, including the risk of having way too many seasons potentially being something hormonal and badly balanced. She was watched carefully for bleeding and all was fine.

 

That is a very specific and quite unusual case though, definitely not the standard situation for bitches.

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One thing maybe worth mentioning here for first time female dog owners. Bitches are at their most fertile around day 14 which is often when they stop the first heavy flow of blood. So, don't go getting complacent about not letting her out or near any male dogs - she is scenting every time she walks down your street telling all the resident males "I'm Free - Come and get me". Keep her under wraps throughout the 21 days and you should be ok.

Just for info - there are 3 main reasons for getting females neutered

a) No blood on the carpet/floor/kids toys and everything else likely to be on the receiving end

b) No unwanted puppies and males loitering around your garden gate. Some bitches will even climb out of gardens and run off themselves - neutering stops all of that

c) No risk of pyometra which is a horridly painful often fatal and always expensive illness that affects un-neutered bitches.

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