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Have you heard of these sayings ?

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What about folk who were, Tight as a fishes backside and that's water tight, could peel an Orange in their pocket,or would pinch a blind man's dinner and go back for plate.

A Giddy kipper, Soft as a brush, Weak as dish water, Hard as nails,a nut case or a Lairy bugger....

Edited by grinder

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Reading these posts, where people have used t' to show the unsaid the. We all know what it means but a none Yorkie over pronounces it. A better way would be to stick a t' on the end of the previous word hence roundt' lump would better express what we are trying to say.

I don't use the expression "I've just run roundt' lump" anymore now I say, "I drove roundt' lump"

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Remember being fed up, Browned off, cheesed off. or Dead chuffed, laughin little little apples, over moon, Happy as Larry.

Which meant I was either Full as a butchers dog or sick as a parrot..

Being told I had a "come day go day hurry up Sunday" attitude to work,or thick as a plank.

Being threatened with a clip round lug oil,a backhander a thick ear or having me back side tanned and if I were really bad all me gallivanting stopped !!!....

 

Happy days..[/Q you are right ,they were happy days,i also remember all these sayings, as for the last bit it;s a shame it doe;s not happen more now, but i am afraid there are to many people ready to sue for the simplest of things even the parents are afraid to touch there own children,i remember when if you swore in front of a couple the man would threaten you with a thick ear,now if you say anything to the young ones you get more abuse or even assaulted, not so happy days now i'm afraid.

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Remember being fed up, Browned off, cheesed off. or Dead chuffed, laughin little little apples, over moon, Happy as Larry.

Which meant I was either Full as a butchers dog or sick as a parrot..

Being told I had a "come day go day hurry up Sunday" attitude to work,or thick as a plank.

Being threatened with a clip round lug oil,a backhander a thick ear or having me back side tanned and if I were really bad all me gallivanting stopped !!!....

 

Happy days..

 

Were you threatened by your mum or dad that they were going to "tan your Arse so hard, you weren't doing to sit down for a month of Sundays!" ?

 

I still use a phrase that my mum used frequently, which is "daytal", (from lackadaisical, or "lacksadaytal" as she pronounced it. meaning a bit dim, a bit gormess, unable to concentrate.

 

And look there! That's another one! "Gormless" or "Gormy"

 

Did you get told off for "mimmy-mawking?"

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What about folk who were, Tight as a fishes backside and that's water tight, could peel an Orange in their pocket,or would pinch a blind man's dinner and go back for plate.

A Giddy kipper, Soft as a brush, Weak as dish water, Hard as nails,a nut case or a Lairy bugger....

 

my family say tighter "than a crab's backside, and that's watter-tight!" or "Tighter than a camel's backside in a sandstorm!"

 

We also use soft/ daft as a brush, and "lary"/"Lairy" my father using the phrase as "a reyt lairy-packet".

 

My grandma used to use "nasty-tassel" or "mucky-custard" if we came in off the garden, from playing in a grubby state.

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Were you threatened by your mum or dad that they were going to "tan your Arse so hard, you weren't doing to sit down for a month of Sundays!" ?

 

I still use a phrase that my mum used frequently, which is "daytal", (from lackadaisical, or "lacksadaytal" as she pronounced it. meaning a bit dim, a bit gormess, unable to concentrate.

 

And look there! That's another one! "Gormless" or "Gormy"

 

Did you get told off for "mimmy-mawking?"

 

I think "mimmy-mawking" is a cracker. Years ago mother-in-law used to have a deaf window cleaner who would "mimmy-mawk" through the window to let her know that he'd finished and that he was ready for his money. I would have tears rolling down my face watching this display of him "mimmy-mawking" and my mother-in-law trying to understand what he was trying to say. We shouldn't laugh really but, it was this expression of "mimmy-mawking" that used to crease me up, not the fact that he was deaf.

Mother-in-law is now 86 and still uses this expression as does my mum aged 84.

Oh, another one, "siling dahn" (raining hard).

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Mimmy-mowkin, that had me gosterin wi laughter.

But as a kid, had a been caught doing it behide any bodys back ad a finished up laughing on tother side o mi face...:confused:

Edited by grinder

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Another old word is Cop,

 

Cop can mean a policeman or men, (coppers) who could cop you doing something wrong and then you could cop it. you can also cop for one, cop hold, cop a feel or cop a look, you can even cop out or be copped out.

So what on earth does cop mean

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I thought my mother had made up mimmy mawking! Just shows you - yeh siling it down also used, lets face it, Sheffield is on its own when it comes to language. I remember saying to a bloke who wasnt from these parts, many years ago, "it opens 7 while 11" - he just didnt get it.

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Another old word is Cop,

 

Cop can mean a policeman or men, (coppers) who could cop you doing something wrong and then you could cop it. you can also cop for one, cop hold, cop a feel or cop a look, you can even cop out or be copped out.

So what on earth does cop mean

 

I don't know, but my Granny was always threatening me and my sister that we'd "catch a coppit!" if we were being a bit naughty.

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acording to the dictionary Grinder,it means exactly what you say

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