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Have you heard of these sayings ?

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Yes we used the round the block too....but round the lump seems a strange word to use...wonder where it originated from

 

:) we also used to sey. WELL I,LL GO TO BACK OF OUR OUSE [that was said if somboby told you something astonoshing ] Going for a walk round lump meant. Going out for 5 minutes. SI THI LATER THEN :hihi::hihi::hihi:

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Same meaning, but we would reply, ' jus goin rown bloc '. The block being the same as the lump. :|

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I remember a phrase used at home. 'It was all mi eye and Fanny Martin', which was to say something wasn't right.

 

Does anyone know who Fanny Martin was?

 

Happy Days! PopT

 

As I remember it it were "Fanny Addams" .

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Nothing comes up about 'Fanny Martin', But there is a tragic case about 'Fanny Adams. 'Sweet Fanny Adams' as we say.

 

Fanny Adams an 8 year old child abducted in Alton, Hampshire with the offer of sweets. She was bruitilly murdered & dismembed by her killer almost putting the rope around his neck himself, after entering in his diary a child had just been killed. With further evidence of blood on his clothes & other evidence. Her story is now well documented so anyone interested can read about it.

 

Crude jokes by sailors gave us the saying 'sweet Fanny Adams' refering to the mutton in the tin is all they got.

Edited by grave lurker
spelling

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Desperatedan Round the bend seems to come from Victorian Mental Hospitals. They had drives that always had a curve in them where Stately Homes always had straight Drives. So I guess you had to be slightly mad to go in one of these places, or just round this bend and we will be there. There are several variations refering to the saying. someone round the bend is only slightly mad, this was commonly used in the 1920s. :loopy: :loopy:

Edited by grave lurker
correct grammer.

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How about these?

 

She's more rattle than an empty coil cart

 

His eyes stood art like chapel hat pegs an he ad a gob as big as a parish oven

 

New ouse, new babby!

 

Just gorra babby that'll stop her gallop!

 

Wesh thi neck.

 

eez got nowt, gee im a sneck lifter to gerra pint?

 

Happy Days! Popt

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Hi Grinder

 

You may remember the name being Fanny adams as in Sweet Fanny Adams but where I was brought up it definitely was 'All mi Eye an Fanny Martin' meaning it was a fairy story or a made up story.

Still looking for the origins of Fanny Martin.

 

Anyone any Ideas?

 

PopT

Edited by PopT

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How about these?

 

She's more rattle than an empty coil cart

 

His eyes stood art like chapel hat pegs an he ad a gob as big as a parish oven

 

New ouse, new babby!

 

Just gorra babby that'll stop her gallop!

 

Wesh thi neck.

 

eez got nowt, gee im a sneck lifter to gerra pint?

 

Happy Days! Popt

 

chez Talker it was "More rattle than a can of mabs!"

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Hi Spider 1

Another saying to show surprise was " Well, I'll go to foot o' our stairs

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I love the way you can say a whole sentence with one word in Sheffield,

"Let me through please" is,

Geh-raht-tut-roo-ud

 

 

 

 

shutthigoboralshuttitfothi

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

close your mouth or i'll close it for you:D

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Wotsthathinkthatdoin What do you think you are doing.

Imgunnashop I'm going to the shop.

dusthawantowtfetchin. Do you want anything fetching.

Edited by Janber

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