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Have you heard of these sayings ?

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i think the sheffield dialect is brilliant,my hubbys american an is always laffing at some of the things we say,he nearly died the first time a bus driver called him love i could write a book!!!he loves our accent and when i go over to see his family i have to slow my speech down and think what im sayin as they sometimes look at me gone out and havent a clue what im on about lol

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Yes we used the round the block too....but round the lump seems a strange word to use...wonder where it originated from

 

we used to go round tlump and round watterside

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what about what thaa pyking at or no pykin

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what about what thaa pyking at or no pykin

 

. . . and nebbing.

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Can any of you older posters remember this.."goin for a walk round lump"...i said it the other day and my grandson said "what"!!!!!...:)

 

Is it just a Sheffield saying?

 

It was something my late father used to say and something I haven't heard in a long time.:) You've made me feel quite sad now.............:(

Edited by Daven

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I always say i am going to take my little dog (who doesn;t like walking very far) for a walk around the lump, dont think you actually realise what it is you are saying until some one asks where is the lump, I just think its not a long way to walk.

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I used to use the expression regularly when I lived in Sheffield, but when you move away you are aware that a lot things you are used to saying do not travel, so you end up not using them any more. I had forgotten all about that one. I noticed on a very recent visit just how much I have changed my vocubulary and pronounciations, I actually say there as opposed to theer! over there!

Edited by Mrs H Solo
error

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Sheffield is built on severn hills(as is Rome)hence the word lump,

as the housing estate spread allover the hillsides,

the term going to walk around t'lump means to walk up and down the hills on which your estate was built and then came to mean going for a walk t'round area in which you live.

In my dads case down t'pub and back on sundays before his sunday dinner.

Funny how the dog allways got home an hour before he did,

he used to say he's got four legs I've only two so he can walk twice as fast.

 

Well my Dad ( you knew him denlin :hihi:) used to tell us when we were bored to take a walk around t'lump, and that's what we would call a block in Canada or America. When our Dad went out, we'd ask him where he was going, his reply was always, to see a man about a dog. :hihi:

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Well my Dad ( you knew him denlin :hihi:) used to tell us when we were bored to take a walk around t'lump, and that's what we would call a block in Canada or America. When our Dad went out, we'd ask him where he was going, his reply was always, to see a man about a dog. :hihi:

 

Agree Joto.

It means exactly the same as "Taking a walk round the block"..

To "See a man about a dog" is the male equivalent of "going to powder your nose".

A polite way of saying I'm "Going for a pit stop".....:hihi:

 

PS.

I thought Canada was in America ?

Edited by grinder

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PS.

I thought Canada was in America ?

 

Grinder America is one country and Canada another, but we're both part of North America, okay?:thumbsup:

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I remembered a couple of really old fashioned sayings the other day, both relating to individuals who are not really up to speed. The first was 'He's a reight piecan he is,' presumably 'a right nutter', the 'piecan' bit coming from 'Pecan', the nut.

The other one was to be called a 'Duck Egg', meaning stupid. Anybody old enough to remember these?

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We always went 'round the lump'. Sheffield has lots of lumps - houses built on hills.....

up a hill, across the top and down another hill to get home.

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