Jump to content


Why has religion retained its appeal?

Vaati

This is the final warning this thread will get, any further bickering, baiting or posts that break the forum rules the thread will be closed. Accounts will be suspended.

Message added by Vaati

Recommended Posts

11 minutes ago, Halibut said:

 

Of course you didn't cover your hair, you're not a woman, isn't it funny how only women have to cover their hair? Did you wave to the women  from your segregated area away from them ?

Edited by Hots on

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, Halibut said:

You're not even making any sense now. Restrictive measures, by definition, don't permit things.

 

Can we explore this bizarre bee in your bonnet a while?

 

You are making a great issue of the idea that the police might (and I use might as it's a rather unlikely scenario) make enquiries of our chap in a balaclava on a warm day and probably wouldn't make similar enquiries of a woman wearing niqab.

 

Why? Why does it bother you?

 

Is it that you feel it's unfair? If so, who is it unfair to?

 

Do you think balaclavas should be banned? Niqabs?

 Restrictive measures reform social attitudes and discourage people from doing and/or engaging in certain things, and a prime example of a restrictive measure being applied in public is the police stopping and questioning someone wearing a balaclava for no apparent reason on a warm day despite there being no law against wearing a balaclava for no apparent reason a warm day. 

Ever asked yourself (why am I asking you this, of course you won't have) why wearing a balaclava in public for no apparent reason is considered strange and of interest to the police when wearing other unnecessary fashionable head accessories such as a woolly hat in nice weather, or, dark sunglasses in the evening, or gloves in T shirt weather isn't really picked up on?  It's due to the 'Restrictive measures' that are in place.

Not sure what makes this scenario so unlikely either. Styles of dress are becoming more diverse and weird/strange by the day. You see people wearing all sorts of odd things, but each to their own say.   And, no. I don't think either garment should be banned. I just think the wearers of both ought to be thought of and treated equally out in public.  And NO,  they're not.   

Edited by danot

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, danot said:

You've yet to explain why wearing a balaclava in public for no apparent reason on a warm day should be of interest to the police.

In the same way if you were hiding in a bush. Perfectly legal and above board, but they might ask you what you are doing!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, woodview said:

In the same way if you were hiding in a bush. Perfectly legal and above board, but they might ask you what you are doing!

Loitering you mean? Loitering isn't without its restrictions, so restrictive measures apply here too.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
6 minutes ago, danot said:

Loitering you mean? Loitering isn't without its restrictions, so restrictive measures apply here too.  

You're only loitering if you are staying there with no apparent reason. They'd have to question you to establish that.......

Having said that, I must admit to only commenting out of jest, because I'm not sure the long running niqab / balaclava debate is getting to the root of religious belief. I could be wrong of course.

Edited by woodview

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, woodview said:

You're only loitering if you are staying there with no apparent reason. They'd have to question you to establish that.......

Having said that, I must admit to only commenting out of jest, because I'm not sure the long running niqab / balaclava debate is getting to the root of religious belief. I could be wrong of course.

For me, balaclava wearing is a unrestricted freedom, and if the police do stop a balaclava wearer in public to have a quick chat, you'll be witnessing  a 'restrictive measure'. 

Authorities wouldn't want balaclava wearing to catch on, it'd complicate policing somewhat for starters, not to mention Big Brother style street surveillance, which is why the police tend treat it as a matter of interest, and why there seems to be a mild stigma attached to wearing one or accompanying a wearer out in public. It's not the done thing,  despite it being one of the many unrestricted freedoms of this country. Anyhow. You're right.    Enough about balaclavas.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, danot said: I just think the wearers of both ought to be thought of and treated equally out in public.  And NO,  they're not.   

What needs to happen in order for both to be treated equally?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Halibut said:

What needs to happen in order for both to be treated equally?

Let's have a think. How's about- The crime associative prejudices against certain none religious face concealing headwear being lawfully and socially accepted as a hate crime.  Too much?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, danot said:

Let's have a think. How's about- The crime associative prejudices against certain none religious face concealing headwear being lawfully and socially accepted as a hate crime.  Too much?

Utterly laughable. What are you claiming these 'crime associative prejudices' are and against which non religious face concealing headware are they evident?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, danot said:

Let's have a think. How's about- The crime associative prejudices against certain none religious face concealing headwear being lawfully and socially accepted as a hate crime.  Too much?

No, not too much. The balaclavians have been oppressed and suffered for their beliefs for too long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, danot said:

For me, balaclava wearing is a unrestricted freedom, and if the police do stop a balaclava wearer in public to have a quick chat, you'll be witnessing  a 'restrictive measure'. 

Authorities wouldn't want balaclava wearing to catch on, it'd complicate policing somewhat for starters, not to mention Big Brother style street surveillance, which is why the police tend treat it as a matter of interest, and why there seems to be a mild stigma attached to wearing one or accompanying a wearer out in public. It's not the done thing,  despite it being one of the many unrestricted freedoms of this country. Anyhow. You're right.    Enough about balaclavas.  

Do you consider it restrictive if somebody stops you to ask for directions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
26 minutes ago, Halibut said:

Utterly laughable. What are you claiming these 'crime associative prejudices' are and against which non religious face concealing headware are they evident?

The types of headwear are apparent. I'm wont be listing them for you because we've already discussed them. And why do you always persist in denying the blindingly obvious truth?  Accept life as it is instead of always defending society's ideals.  

Just now, RootsBooster said:

Do you consider it restrictive if somebody stops you to ask for directions?

No?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.

X