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The Consequences of Brexit [part 5] Read 1st post before posting

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1 minute ago, BrexitGuy said:

It hasn't bothered us up to now.

What an absurd answer. Are you saying that Brexit won't have these effects, or that it will and you don't care?

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1 minute ago, Halibut said:

What an absurd answer. Are you saying that Brexit won't have these effects, or that it will and you don't care?

Not at all. It's the typical scaremongering of a remoaner.

Did you know that Britain has the highest tourist footfall in Spain and last year we spent 1.88 Billion pounds on their shores?

Can you see Spain allowing some kind of embargo on British visitors after Brexit??

Your a bigger fool than you appear if you think that the Europeans will put up with that.

 

 

6 minutes ago, Car Boot said:

What recession? 

The Employment sector is booming, with very low unemployment and wages rising.

We have no restricted movement or food shortages.

 

You can obviously see into the future, or are you just repeating government scenarios which have a terrible record of actually happening and quickly become discredited?

 

Do you have anything original to say?

You may be banging your head upon a brick wall here....

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8 minutes ago, BrexitGuy said:

Not at all. It's the typical scaremongering of a remoaner.

Did you know that Britain has the highest tourist footfall in Spain and last year we spent 1.88 Billion pounds on their shores?

Can you see Spain allowing some kind of embargo on British visitors after Brexit??

Your a bigger fool than you appear if you think that the Europeans will put up with that.

 

 

You're going to end up on the wrong side of history. I'll be mercilessly reminding you when you do.

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There are about 900,000 British ex-pats living in the EU.

I've just read that there are 1.3 million British people living in Australia.

How this has happened without the EU's FOM I simply can't comprehend!

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Just now, Halibut said:

You're going to end up on the wrong side of history. I'll be mercilessly reminding you when you do.

What an absurd answer!!

Rather than agree with me (and judging by the time it took you to respond, you've obviously seen what we spend in Europe and are really angry with yourself for not spotting this) you would rather play the "I Think I'm Clever" answer.

Note; you are not.

Too many lies from the remain camp about Brexit. What you fail to realise is that European countries will not allow Brussels to treat the UK as criminals after Brexit. They will not jeopardize their businesses to appease the EU,s stance on how it will treat us. There won't be food shortages nor in the mind of a typical remoaner will there be a tornado over Dewsbury.

You are talking utter nonsense. 

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56 minutes ago, Car Boot said:

The EU is absolutely enforcing austerity on Italy.

 

The democratically elected coalition government want to introduce a mild pro-growth budget which includes a basic income for the poorest people (over 5 million in Italy live in absolute poverty). But fiscal discipline, not people, is what is important to the EU.  So the non-elected EU threatened the elected Italian government with an Excessive Deficit Procedure which could have led to a fine of about €9 billion if it did not capitulate.

 

The coalition government wants to spend to stimulate growth in the economy, boosting consumption and employment, as EU austerity measures have failed - creating terrible poverty without cutting the national debt.

 

So basically austerity, which hasn't cut debt, is being used to placate the markets. The EU, as always, puts the markets before people. 

 

https://euobserver.com/opinion/143593

The EU isn't enforcing austerity: the EU is enforcing the fiscal pact which Italy signed up to, of its own free will.

 

The austerity is a by-product of successive Italian governments' fiscal policies lacking in prudentiality. Same in Greece yesteryear, same in the UK, France, Spain <etc> still.

 

There is an easy (enough) solution available to Italy, if it so wishes to pursue fiscal policies putting its solvability at risk: it is free to exit the €uro and go back to the Lira. Same as Greece was with the Drachma yesteryear.

 

The fact that the very vast majority of Italian national debt is held in Italian hands, whence a reversion to the Lira would be so severe a haircut to bondholders, that the average Italian would have no head left, is for the Italian government to consider in its deliberations.

 

Perhaps that fact influenced their decision to stick with the €uro some weeks back. But since that's what the democratically elected coalition government decided, then the fiscal pact with the Eurozone stands, as do its rules.

 

Still can't have your cake and eating it in this day and age I'm afraid, no more than anyone ever could.

Edited by L00b

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15 minutes ago, Car Boot said:

There are about 900,000 British ex-pats living in the EU.

I've just read that there are 1.3 million British people living in Australia.

How this has happened without the EU's FOM I simply can't comprehend!

They're not British expats, they're British immigrants.

 

And the UK government deliberately abandoned them to their fate this week. Yes, that's British citizens. Trap-doored by Theresa May and Javid. Hard to think, when the UK went so far at to wage war on Argentina over the Falklanders.

 

As for your lack of comprehension about Oz, only a foreigner unfamilar with British and Commonwealth history couldn't comprehend. Perhaps ask your GRU handler for a summary?

 

 

Edited by L00b

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15 minutes ago, Car Boot said:

There are about 900,000 British ex-pats living in the EU.

I've just read that there are 1.3 million British people living in Australia.

How this has happened without the EU's FOM I simply can't comprehend!

Oh look Australia,part of the commomwealth,has British people living there,who'd have thought it?

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53 minutes ago, Halibut said:

How will recession, job losses, restricted movement and food shortages benefit the people exactly?

Economists have predicted fifteen of the next two recessions.

 

Think about it.

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Just wondering how the White Paper on future immigration policy sits with contributors on here.

Basically it just seems that it takes away any preference for EU workers whilst acknowledging the necessity for workers,both skilled and unskilled from overseas.

The main issue arising is the defining of skill in the wage or salary that it pays.

 

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49 minutes ago, RJRB said:

Just wondering how the White Paper on future immigration policy sits with contributors on here.

Basically it just seems that it takes away any preference for EU workers whilst acknowledging the necessity for workers,both skilled and unskilled from overseas.

The main issue arising is the defining of skill in the wage or salary that it pays.

 

It does all that and, from a labour competition, it's great for the EU27: it's kryptonite for the UK job market's pull factor, which means EU27 employers get to pick from a bigger and better pool of mobile high-to-low skilled migrants.

 

I mean, take your average doctor or  STEM type: it's not a photo finish between FoM Berlin and non-FoM London. Likewise for fruit pickers between FoM Rhone and non-FoM Lincolnshire (especially given the £/€ at that pay level).

 

And that's for the objective assessment, before we consider the more subjective aspects, like the now-widespread perception of the UK's anti-immigration stance (your politicians' very vocal and very public adoption of UKIP themes did you no favour there) and that, at the higher end of the skillsets, migrants pick and choose on quality of life (and welcome) just as much as on pay.

 

For EU27 services, it's double-bonanza: not only do they get UK's market share of services exported throughout EU27 free of charge, but they also gain in capacity and quality with the best-of-breed mobile workforce that would have gone to the UK.

 

I've actually already seen that at work, with the Romanian paralegals we took on this year: they made it look an easy choice for them, between their ex-employer's projected internal promotion to a London office, and our new job offer in Lux, on around the same money.

 

Other favoured/up-and-coming landing sites like Oz, Canada and Dubai should likewise be getting more and better choice of ex-UK and non-UK-bound EU27 skilled workers; especially healthcare: immigration rules for immigration rules, might as well go where the pay, working conditions and weather are better 😂 

 

However, formany mixed families (UK/EU27) in the EU27, it's a calamity, particularly for those whose 'market value' of each partner is less than £30k: the choice for the UK partner is basically either stay with your EU27 spouse in the EU27, or move to the UK to be with your UK relatives, but you can't have both (since the EU27 will reciprocate whatever the UK does; currently, that immigration white paper).

 

Personally, we're partially in that situation (UK Mrs in EU27, I earn the €s). Partially, because I could walk into a multiples-of-£30k job in the UK tomorrow. But we're not going back to live in the Brexited UK (I'd lose half my prof.quals, and so am worth much more in EU27 post-Brexit). So UK mother in law is on a timed warning for when the time comes (care home or live with us: choice open until Brexit day, whether in 99 days or by end Dec 2020 or 2021). She voted for it, she can assume the personal consequences of her vote.

Edited by L00b

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