Jump to content
Scheduled Update @ 10:30 18/06/19 Read more... ×

The Consequences of Brexit [part 5] Read 1st post before posting

Recommended Posts

I guess this government’s handling of the referendum result to date, eventually turned that comfort letter which they got from Mrs May back in the day, into the same snake oil as the £350m bus slogan.

 

Who’d have thought? :roll:

 

For a modern G7 democracy, the damage done to date, mostly all from domestic political infighting and errors of judgement, is astounding. Sobering, as well.

Edited by L00b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I’m not sure that your disagreement is justified: the net result of two competing plans, wherein they are opposed and neither gains ascendency on the other, is ‘no plan’ ;)

 

Schadenfreude posts aside, I’m still hoping for your collective sake that it won’t end in tears. But with the operational deadline sometime this October (to ensure that whatever deal is reached, gets voted through everywhere it needs to, in good time by end March 2019), i.e. 4 months away, every passing day without progress (some would even say, without having even started) makes this ever more unlikely...

 

...and the UK is getting beyond late to prep for a no deal outcome, as well. No IT, no trainee customs officers, no lorry car parks in Devon, no replacement regulatory agencies, etc, etc...not even procurement ongoing for these.

 

Lets not forget all the MPs will be on their long summer break very soon, so not much can happen over the next few months.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Politically the importance of this news cannot be underestimated!

 

Sunderland was the first pro-Brexit result on referendum night, triggered a run on the pound and soon afterwards the very people who had voted to leave the EU were faced with 'project fear' becoming 'project cold hard reality' as Nissan started to make noises about the viability of a plant that was soon to become located outside of the EU.

 

Later that year the government did a secret deal with Nissan to keep them in Sunderland for the foreseeable and there are very credible rumours that the Department of Trade and Industry and HMRC told Nissan that they could basically 'have anything they wanted' as long as they remained. We may never never know what the terms of that deal were but it looks like back in Yokohama, the company has decided that however generous it was, it would not compensate for what it stands to lose through Brexit.

 

To me, this is the first real nail in the coffin of Brexit!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cameron never in his wildest dreams expected the result that his election winning referendum promise brought forth, thus he never needed a plan for either scenario. The Tories then vote in another remainer as his successor, obviously devoid of any assemblance of a plan, this is just about as stupid as another pacifist succeeding Neville Chamberlain.

I agree Cameron didn't think the UK would vote to leave the EU. However, he did make it clear that if the UK voted to leave the EU, then the UK would be leaving the single market and the customs union. Cameron also made it clear there would be no second EU referendum.

 

People seem to forget that before the EU referendum vote, Cameron spent months visiting EU country leaders in an attempt to get the EU to reform, which ended in failure. If the EU had wanted to reform, then the vote might have been different.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree Cameron didn't think the UK would vote to leave the EU. However, he did make it clear that if the UK voted to leave the EU, then the UK would be leaving the single market and the customs union. Cameron also made it clear there would be no second EU referendum.

 

People seem to forget that before the EU referendum vote, Cameron spent months visiting EU country leaders in an attempt to get the EU to reform, which ended in failure. If the EU had wanted to reform, then the vote might have been different.

 

It wasn't to get the EU to reform but to acquire a 'Special Status' for the UK within the EU.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It wasn't to get the EU to reform but to acquire a 'Special Status' for the UK within the EU.

The Prime Minister delivered his speech on Europe at Chatham House, setting out the case for EU reform.

 

Prime Minister’s speech

Introduction

Almost 3 years ago, I made a speech about Europe.

 

I argued that the European Union needed to reform if it was to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century.

 

I argued that Britain’s best future lay within a reformed European Union, if the necessary changes could be agreed.

 

And I promised the British people that, if I was re-elected as Prime Minister, we would have an in-out referendum…

 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/prime-ministers-speech-on-europe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Prime Minister delivered his speech on Europe at Chatham House, setting out the case for EU reform.

 

Prime Minister’s speech

Introduction

Almost 3 years ago, I made a speech about Europe.

 

I argued that the European Union needed to reform if it was to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century.

 

I argued that Britain’s best future lay within a reformed European Union, if the necessary changes could be agreed.

 

And I promised the British people that, if I was re-elected as Prime Minister, we would have an in-out referendum…

 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/prime-ministers-speech-on-europe

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-politics-eu-referendum-35622105

 

Check the date

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Prime Minister delivered his speech on Europe at Chatham House, setting out the case for EU reform.

 

Prime Minister’s speech

Introduction

Almost 3 years ago, I made a speech about Europe.

 

I argued that the European Union needed to reform if it was to meet the challenges of the twenty-first century.

 

I argued that Britain’s best future lay within a reformed European Union, if the necessary changes could be agreed.

 

And I promised the British people that, if I was re-elected as Prime Minister, we would have an in-out referendum…

 

 

https://www.gov.uk/government/speeches/prime-ministers-speech-on-europe

So what? The EU was then somehow duty-bound to follow Cameron’s cakeist appeal? What makes the U.K. so special, then? “They need us more than we need them”?

 

You’re not so special. And certainly not to the EU27, who all value the advantages each has derived from the unitary character of the Single Market.

 

As May and Davis have been finding out, repeatedly and consistently since July 2016.

 

The biting irony is that Cameron got most of what he asked (yes, more cake indeed). But that was grossly and widely misrepresented as a failure in the pro-Brexit press, and as usual their readers lapped it up wholesale. Why the Brexit cake (and unicorns) will not ever materialise, is exactly the same as why Cameron didn’t get what the pro-Brexit crowd wanted him to get back then, and is what Davis ran smack into in the negotiations.

Edited by L00b

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't understand your point. The fact is Cameron intended to get the EU to reform and failed.

 

The point is rhetoric changes. It's a moot point anyway.

 

If we're going back far enough in hindsight, Cameron should have left out the referendum from the manifesto. We would be blissfully unaware and not in the mess we're in today.

Edited by SnailyBoy

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I agree Cameron didn't think the UK would vote to leave the EU. However, he did make it clear that if the UK voted to leave the EU, then the UK would be leaving the single market and the customs union. Cameron also made it clear there would be no second EU referendum.

 

Cameron is gone, as are the value of any promises he made.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.