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Cycle Lane past station

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How are they creating danger?

 

Pedestrians are made of soft stuff and are generally slow moving.

 

I can’t imagine how a pedestrian can constitute a danger. I guess they could be endangered by careless cyclists, but that is a different matter.

 

A 'slow moving soft stuff' obstacle around a corner where I shouldn't find such an obstacle. How can that be anything except dangerous?

 

---------- Post added 26-06-2018 at 07:21 ----------

 

So slow down and pass them wide. Leaving a gap of about 1.5m. Like you expect other roads users to do for you......

 

How can I pass them wide? Cycle lanes are often not 1.5 metres wide themselves... It's not like a pedestrian in the carriageway, where you've got 15 - 20 metres to play with to get your 4 metre wide car past them.

It's a 1.5 metre wide cycle lane, with a pedestrian in the middle of it. There's generally not enough space to pass them at all, the only option is to stop whilst they gormlessly shuffle 3 ft over onto the pavement they should have always been on.

 

---------- Post added 26-06-2018 at 07:23 ----------

 

I'm probably guilty of walking in a cycle lane simply because I'm sometimes unaware that a slightly different colour of pavement indicates it's for cyclists, when there are so many other patches, trenches and colours of pavement, and no obvious signage indicating cycle lane.

 

Even the most oblivious should figure this out though.

 

https://www.google.co.uk/maps/@53.3914117,-1.483781,3a,75y,236.21h,73.34t/data=!3m5!1e1!3m3!1sLfBu37JmYENOJPj5XeJc9g!2e0!6s%2F%2Fgeo0.ggpht.com%2Fcbk%3Fpanoid%3DLfBu37JmYENOJPj5XeJc9g%26output%3Dthumbnail%26cb_client%3Dmaps_sv.tactile.gps%26thumb%3D2%26w%3D203%26h%3D100%26yaw%3D115.65013%26pitch%3D0%26thumbfov%3D100

 

It's physically separate. A different colour. Has bikes painted on it and blue signs with destinations and bikes on them.

 

---------- Post added 26-06-2018 at 07:25 ----------

 

So slow down and pass them wide. Leaving a gap of about 1.5m. Like you expect other roads users to do for you......

 

Oh, and whilst you think you're being funny, cycles are allowed to use the road and car drivers are supposed to be competent enough to pass them safely.

Pedestrians aren't supposed to use cycle lanes, and obviously I do pass them safely, but they're still a danger, because they're not supposed to be there at all. :roll:

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A 'slow moving soft stuff' obstacle around a corner where I shouldn't find such an obstacle. How can that be anything except dangerous?

 

 

Then you need to ride with more care, remembering that it is you that is the danger, not the pedestrian. The pedestrian is simply a more vulnerable road user. Please treat them as such.

 

As you clearly need it, let me pass on a tip, based upon my 30 years of accident free driving and cycling. If you cannot stop within your field of vision, you are going too fast.

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How are they creating danger?

 

Pedestrians are made of soft stuff and are generally slow moving.

 

I can’t imagine how a pedestrian can constitute a danger. I guess they could be endangered by careless cyclists, but that is a different matter.

 

I would say that play dough is soft stuff but I would imagine that riding in to a 200lb block of it could be quite dangerous

 

---------- Post added 26-06-2018 at 08:16 ----------

 

I've found that most pedestrians don't acknowledge cycle paths across the whole of the city centre. In a morning you often see cyclists having to ride on the footpath because there are so many pedestrians on the cycle path.

 

With regards to my own post above and in mild defence of pedestrians, some cycle lanes are very poorly marked or defined. This is no excuse for lack of commonsense or awareness of surroundings though.

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I would say that play dough is soft stuff but I would imagine that riding in to a 200lb block of it could be quite dangerous

 

---------- Post added 26-06-2018 at 08:16 ----------

 

 

Indeed.

 

But it would be the riding, not the existence of the Play Dough that caused the danger.

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Indeed.

 

But it would be the riding, not the existence of the Play Dough that caused the danger.

 

I would say that if you place large quantities of 200lb play dough blocks, at staggered and random intervals along a narrow route designated specifically for cyclists, it's the play dough that's the problem.

 

If there's a raised tripping hazard on the pavement (such as a crooked/lifted slab), is it the pedestrians that are causing the danger?

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What about the cyclists that fly past the doors at the back of the train station! It really shocks me sometimes, I've nearly been knocked flying as I've emerged out those doors near the tram stop! I mean surely it just takes a bit of common sense that there might actually be people coming out of there and that those on bikes should try and slow down or dismount for a couple of seconds! Really!:roll:

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I would say that if you place large quantities of 200lb play dough blocks, at staggered and random intervals along a narrow route designated specifically for cyclists, it's the play dough that's the problem.

 

If there's a raised tripping hazard on the pavement (such as a crooked/lifted slab), is it the pedestrians that are causing the danger?

 

It would be quite silly to place multiple large lumps of Play Dough on a cycle path. The almondy smell would be unpleasant too.

 

Maybe better to return to the real world. What if the 200lb block of Play Dough was to be replaced by a child in a push chair? In such a circumstance, would you expect a cyclist to be in sufficient control of their vehicle that they would not plough into the child?

 

City centres are shared spaces not race tracks for bikes, or cars.

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What about the cyclists that fly past the doors at the back of the train station! It really shocks me sometimes, I've nearly been knocked flying as I've emerged out those doors near the tram stop! I mean surely it just takes a bit of common sense that there might actually be people coming out of there and that those on bikes should try and slow down or dismount for a couple of seconds! Really!:roll:

 

Although there are many more considerate/intelligent cyclists who do slow down when passing this exit I'd definitely agree that there's still a serious accident risk here given the speed at which the more 'entitled' cyclists pass by.

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Although there are many more considerate/intelligent cyclists who do slow down when passing this exit I'd definitely agree that there's still a serious accident risk here given the speed at which the more 'entitled' cyclists pass by.

 

This is the thing, in a nutshell.

 

Most pedestrians/cyclists/ car drivers rub along just fine together. The challenge is to try to reign in those in each category that think that the roads belong to them alone.

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It would be quite silly to place multiple large lumps of Play Dough on a cycle path. The almondy smell would be unpleasant too.

 

Maybe better to return to the real world. What if the 200lb block of Play Dough was to be replaced by a child in a push chair? In such a circumstance, would you expect a cyclist to be in sufficient control of their vehicle that they would not plough into the child?

 

Your single child in a push chair would be easily avoidable. Unfortunately the cycle lanes tend to have numerous pedestrians wandering in all directions across them, making it much more of an obstacle course.

 

City centres are shared spaces not race tracks for bikes, or cars.

I believe this is why we have footpaths, cycle paths and roads. Nobody should be racing (or travelling too fast to be in control of their vehicle), but that's not even possible anyway, if there's pedestrians all over the cycle paths.

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Pedestrians always have the right of way, phones or not.

 

What makes you so sure about that?

He's sort of right, but also very, very wrong. Right of way doesn't mean what many people think it does. Simply, it means you have the right to use a particular thoroughfare. For example, cars have right of way on motorways but not on footpaths, bikes have right of way on cycle paths but not motorways.

What we do operate is a system of give way and priority at junctions etc. You should always give way if it helps to avoid an incident.

In the case in hand where you have pedestrians in the cycle lane they do no have the right of way to be there, but if they are you do have to give way. You don't have the right to just plow into them.

Edited by barleycorn

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He's sort of right, but also very, very wrong. Right of way doesn't mean what many people think it does. Simply, it means you have the right to use a particular thoroughfare. For example, cars have right of way on motorways but not on footpaths, bikes have right of way on cycle paths but not motorways.

What we do operate is a system of give way and priority at junctions etc. You should always give way if it helps to avoid an incident.

In the case in hand where you have pedestrians in the cycle lane they do no have the right of way to be there, but if they are you do have to give way. You don't have the right to just plow into them.

 

All of which is correct and sensible, apart from one detail. There is no law preventing pedestrians from being in a cycle lane. They have a perfect right to be there. Whether it is sensible, or reasonable for them to be there, is another matter.

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