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Spearmint Rhino has licence renewed

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one of the biggest ad campaigns was the "Hello Boys" wonder bra commercial, sexist in your opinion no doubt. BUT the Levi's campaign with Nick Kamen in the 80's where a male goes in the laundrette and takes everything off was a bigger success, but thats a bloke getting nearly naked so is that sexist too?

This was a reply to Agent C, who hadn't mentioned sexism, but was talking about commodification.

So, not, it really is confusing the two. You might wish to say that commodification is exploitation and reinforces sexism, but Agent C didn't.

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This was a reply to Agent C, who hadn't mentioned sexism, but was talking about commodification.

So, not, it really is confusing the two. You might wish to say that commodification is exploitation and reinforces sexism, but Agent C didn't.

 

Fair does.

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My point about commodification is that it affects ALL women, and that includes me (someone earlier seemed to be assuming that I was a man). It's not just a case of if you don't like it don't go. Strip clubs and the like reinforce the notion that women's bodies can be bought and sold and that a woman's main currency is her sexuality. That's irregardless of whether people choose to work there, enjoy it, etc. It's damaging to all women who want to be taken seriously for attributes other than their bodies. No wonder so many women report being sexually harassed - these clubs normalise the notion that women are there to be leered at and are sexually available.

 

And in answer to the previous question, I wouldn't go and see a film if its main selling point was gratuitous sexual imagery, but I can't see how a sex scene as part of a storyline compares with a club where the main purpose is women stripping for money.

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My point about commodification is that it affects ALL women, and that includes me (someone earlier seemed to be assuming that I was a man). It's not just a case of if you don't like it don't go. Strip clubs and the like reinforce the notion that women's bodies can be bought and sold and that a woman's main currency is her sexuality. That's irregardless of whether people choose to work there, enjoy it, etc. It's damaging to all women who want to be taken seriously for attributes other than their bodies. No wonder so many women report being sexually harassed - these clubs normalise the notion that women are there to be leered at and are sexually available.

 

And in answer to the previous question, I wouldn't go and see a film if its main selling point was gratuitous sexual imagery, but I can't see how a sex scene as part of a storyline compares with a club where the main purpose is women stripping for money.

 

You do realise that bodies from both sexes are used this way.

 

Sex sells. Why do you think pretty boys and pretty girls pose for photoshoots next to some product? Why do you think for every so called seedy and disgusting lapdancing bar there are seemingly perfectly acceptable male strip troupes and semi naked men for hire to spice up hen parties and birthdays. Why do you think every other television programme gets filled with the pouty, glamour hungry, preened types? (*see TOWIE/Love Island/Chelsea/Kardashians). Why are the Sunday Sport and Lads Mags criticised and banned but its perfectly acceptable for every other womans magazine to have some waxed, oiled bloke in their knickers posing on the centre pages?

 

Its business. A business with a market. A business that has been long established for decades.

 

Bodies are a commodity for those who choose to use them that way. For many people its a damn good living. Its their choice and despite what many critics scream it does work BOTH ways.

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My point about commodification is that it affects ALL women, and that includes me (someone earlier seemed to be assuming that I was a man). It's not just a case of if you don't like it don't go. Strip clubs and the like reinforce the notion that women's bodies can be bought and sold and that a woman's main currency is her sexuality. That's irregardless of whether people choose to work there, enjoy it, etc. It's damaging to all women who want to be taken seriously for attributes other than their bodies. No wonder so many women report being sexually harassed - these clubs normalise the notion that women are there to be leered at and are sexually available.

 

And in answer to the previous question, I wouldn't go and see a film if its main selling point was gratuitous sexual imagery, but I can't see how a sex scene as part of a storyline compares with a club where the main purpose is women stripping for money.

 

So do you blame the women that work there?

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Men just aren't objectified in the media anywhere near as much as women. It's become 'normal' to have semi naked pictures of teenage girls in daily newspapers, for example. That sort of daily objectification has been prevalent for decades, further exacerbating the inequality between the sexes.

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Men just aren't objectified in the media anywhere near as much as women. It's become 'normal' to have semi naked pictures of teenage girls in daily newspapers, for example. That sort of daily objectification has been prevalent for decades, further exacerbating the inequality between the sexes.

 

How does it exacerbate inequality?

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Really? :roll:

 

Yes really. Why do you feel these women are acting in a manner that makes them less equal to men?

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Yes really. Why do you feel these women are acting in a manner that makes them less equal to men?

 

And when did you stop beating your wife? lol

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Beautiful ladies work there it’s good pay and they enjoy their job

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your views are your views and i respect your expression of them, however, i will comment as someone who has worked in venues which you call strip clubs (lap dance bars would be more appropiate in many cases) for a few years.

 

For your first comment people have judged each other of both sexes on their physical appearance since the dawn of time. to be blunt about it, one of the biggest ad campaigns was the "Hello Boys" wonder bra commercial, sexist in your opinion no doubt. BUT the Levi's campaign with Nick Kamen in the 80's where a male goes in the laundrette and takes everything off was a bigger success, but thats a bloke getting nearly naked so is that sexist too?

Judging people on their appearance is a way of life. thats why you have shows like Magic Mike, the Dreamboys, etc where women (and men) in their millions have been to see and judge based on their physical appearance.

Go to a beach, you will see for more flesh there than you would at a venue but woudl you shut a beach off?

 

The women in these venues choose to work there, they are not employed by Rhino or other venues, they pay a fee to the house and a % of their takings. The women hold the power of when they work, whether they wish to do private dances, who they wish to dance for and this is all under VERY strict security to ensure their safety (and of the customers). No touching is allowed, it is all titilation, to use the male stage show alternative you wont find any men getting on the stage and having the female dancers lay on top of them as you do at a magic mike show

 

Seeing as you have not been in Rhino or any other dance venue you may be surprised that (in my experience) about 30-35% of the people who go in are actually female. they may come in to look at the girls dancing for themselves but a lot come in because it is a safe environment to be in on a night out.

 

I know dancers and i've asked why they do it, a lot do cite the money they earn (and some of these girls can easily earn 400+ in a good night but the majority probably get around 150-200) as it is quick, safe and easy. A few are/were students paying their way through university, some do it because they love the thrill, i know that may go against your view but some women do get pleasure from exhibiting themselves and if they can earn money doing it why not. some do it because they are dancers by trade and this is an additional way to earn money in a skilled (and it is a skill, i tried using the pole once, never again) job. Everyone has their reason but it is their choice to do so. Some are just proud of their bodies and don't mind showing them off

 

you ask the question if i would like my daughter to be someone who works in a venue. I'll be honest (and again based on my experience within the business) i have always told her that as long as she is confident, happy, not have to rely on anyone else and not breaking the law then i would support her in every venture she did. So if you want to take that as a yes then yes i would support her if she chose to dance.

 

Thats my opinion based on my experience, you have your views, i have mine. I would suggest though that you actually visit a venue, just once and see what it is actually like inside, your views may alter

 

Well said :) Its nice to hear a honest opinion from someone who has been on the coalface. Thanks for speaking up :thumbsup::thumbsup:

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