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Rules for the gardens of council tenants

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do you really think that every tenant will contact the council to plant a tree?

Er, SCC? Boy, have they picked the wrong local authority!

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do you really think that every tenant will contact the council to plant a tree?

do you think it can be implemented ?

surely there time could be better spent on more important things,its another labour idea that sounds good but wont work,like the 20mph on estates ,but no one to check it.

I fully understand the idea ,but it wont work,the cant even sort out cutting of grass and parking on grass land? they do a reasonable job ,but some ideas would only work if they had lots of staff and sorry but they don't have that luxury.

 

Surely the tenant has to take responsibility for their own tenancy, including garden. If tenants played ball and adhered to their tenancy conditions, there wouldn't be a need to put in complaints about neighbours.

 

But by your reckoning, people still commit murders, speed, use their mobile phones whilst driving... shall we just get rid of those rules and laws too?

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'Surely the tenant has to take responsibility for their own tenancy, including garden. If tenants played ball and adhered to their tenancy conditions, there wouldn't be a need to put in complaints about neighbours.'

 

I fully agree with you leviathan13

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'Surely the tenant has to take responsibility for their own tenancy, including garden. If tenants played ball and adhered to their tenancy conditions, there wouldn't be a need to put in complaints about neighbours.'

 

I fully agree with you leviathan13

 

As do I! when I first started working in the housing department of a local authority, I spent some time reading the old housing files. Estates weren't idyllic in the past, but initially most neighbours lived amicably. They were so glad to have a decent home, as many had lived in slum conditions, even into the 1970s there were homes without bathrooms. Because rent collectors visited most tenants regularly, issues were picked up quickly and addressed.

 

Most tenants need little intervention, they may need the odd repair, or want to move but live mainly in accordance with their tenancy agreement. I'd estimate 90% of housing officers time is spent on 10% of their tenants. I'm not including thosee who are actively receiving support.

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Surely the tenant has to take responsibility for their own tenancy, including garden.

There's a difference, though.

The garden might or might not be T's responsibility. It depends on what the Letting Agreement states.

But the building's structure and mains services are almost always L's responsibility (section 11 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985) in private-sector lettings.

Sad to say, s.11 does not apply if L is a Local Authority.

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There's a difference, though.

The garden might or might not be T's responsibility. It depends on what the Letting Agreement states.

But the building's structure and mains services are almost always L's responsibility (section 11 of the Landlord and Tenant Act 1985) in private-sector lettings.

Sad to say, s.11 does not apply if L is a Local Authority.

 

My point was simply in response to the idea that yes, SCC may struggle to enforce the new tenancy conditions in some circumstances, but that's not an excuse to get rid of the rule.

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