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The way things used to be .

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The never never .We had everything on't tick in our house ,The teli was rental with a box on't back to put two bob pieces in it came from radio rental on't Moor, we had a washing machine that had a big paddle in the middle and that was from Wiggy's also rented.

My first car( that actually got from A to B without breaking down) was a Ford Classic shaped like a space ship with twin head lights, bright yellow with white roof ,it was from Auto Finance on Richards Road at Heely Bottom the down payment was £35 and then £8 a week for years and years ,although it only lasted 6 months before they repossessed it due to me being laid off in the bad winter and skint.

 

I even had a three piece suit on't tick from Holdens at Crookes it was about two quid a week and old Mr Holden would knock on your door on a Friday to collect his money, if you closed the curtains to trick him to thinking you were out he would hide around the corner then come back ten minutes later to catch you in ,

he even used to check the back grate to see if it was newly wet he always got his two quid in the end even though the suit was being worn for work at Wimpy's or Longdons and covered in gobbo.

 

We had cheque men who would give you a Pagetts cheque to spend at Seniors or Beryls so as to get a nice frock ,shirt or standard lamp ,he would also call Friday tea time as it was wages day ,he was also a crafty sod but was often out foxed by a moonlight flit or some one being called up to fight a war in Korea or Aden.

 

The washing machine was called Ada same as my mother in law.

Edited by Albert smith

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How did people live without padgets cheques and wigfalls .

our first tv in married life had the 2 bob box on the rear .My first car was bought very cheap £7 and 10 shillings on account it had no engine . Soon sorted that from scrapyard on middlewood road .

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I even had a three piece suit on't tick from Holdens at Crookes it was about two quid a week and old Mr Holden would knock on your door on a Friday to collect his money, if you closed the curtains to trick him to thinking you were out he would hide around the corner then come back ten minutes later to catch you in ,

he even used to check the back grate to see if it was newly wet he always got his two quid in the end even though the suit was being worn for work at Wimpy's or Longdons and covered in gobbo.

 

I worked on building sites and steel mills. They gave you a pile of old boiler suits in the mills, but on the building sites it was strictly street clothes.

 

No hard hats, steel toed boots, goggles, work gloves, or jeans!

 

Some young guys used to come to work directly from an all nighter at the at the City Hall, or Locarno.

 

Most only had one suit, one pair of shoes, and and one good shirt, and if your mother happened to scorch it with the iron off the fire, on a Friday night, there were "ructions" :)

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We had a TV with a shilling in the slot mode. Half way through a program, it would cut out and everybody would have to search their pockets for another shilling.

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I remember eating in the 50s and 60s.

Pasta had not been invented, it was macaroni or spaghetti.

A take away was a mathematical problem.

Pizza, sounded like a leaning tower somewhere.

Bananas and oranges only appeared at Christmas.

All chips were plain.

Oil was for lubricating...fat was for cooking.

Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves, and never green.

Cubed sugar was regarded as posh.

Chickens didn"t have fingers.

Nobody had heard of yoghurt.

Healthy food was anything edible.

Cooking outside was called camping.

Seaweed was not a recognized food.

Kebab was not even a word, never mind a food.

Sugar enjoyed a good press, and was regarded as white gold.

Prunes were medicinal.

Muesli was readily available, it was called cattle feed.

Pineapples came in chunks in a tin, nobody ever saw a real one.

Water came out of the tap, if someone had suggested bottling it, and charging more than petrol for it, they would have been a laughing stock.

 

The one thing we never ever had on tables in the fifties was elbows, hats and cell phones.

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I remember eating in the 50s and 60s.

Pasta had not been invented, it was macaroni or spaghetti.

A take away was a mathematical problem.

Pizza, sounded like a leaning tower somewhere.

Bananas and oranges only appeared at Christmas.

All chips were plain.

Oil was for lubricating...fat was for cooking.

Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves, and never green.

Cubed sugar was regarded as posh.

Chickens didn"t have fingers.

Nobody had heard of yoghurt.

Healthy food was anything edible.

Cooking outside was called camping.

Seaweed was not a recognized food.

Kebab was not even a word, never mind a food.

Sugar enjoyed a good press, and was regarded as white gold.

Prunes were medicinal.

Muesli was readily available, it was called cattle feed.

Pineapples came in chunks in a tin, nobody ever saw a real one.

Water came out of the tap, if someone had suggested bottling it, and charging more than petrol for it, they would have been a laughing stock.

 

The one thing we never ever had on tables in the fifties was elbows, hats and cell phones.

 

 

 

Enjoyed reading this, passed it on to a few of my friends.

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I remember eating in the 50s and 60s.

Pasta had not been invented, it was macaroni or spaghetti.

A take away was a mathematical problem.

Pizza, sounded like a leaning tower somewhere.

Bananas and oranges only appeared at Christmas.

All chips were plain.

Oil was for lubricating...fat was for cooking.

Tea was made in a teapot using tea leaves, and never green.

Cubed sugar was regarded as posh.

Chickens didn"t have fingers.

Nobody had heard of yoghurt.

Healthy food was anything edible.

Cooking outside was called camping.

Seaweed was not a recognized food.

Kebab was not even a word, never mind a food.

Sugar enjoyed a good press, and was regarded as white gold.

Prunes were medicinal.

Muesli was readily available, it was called cattle feed.

Pineapples came in chunks in a tin, nobody ever saw a real one.

Water came out of the tap, if someone had suggested bottling it, and charging more than petrol for it, they would have been a laughing stock.

 

The one thing we never ever had on tables in the fifties was elbows, hats and cell phones.

 

....... Or new shoes 'cause that was bad luck ! :hihi:

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If youre going to copy and paste something can you also link to or at least quote the source please.

 

Thank you.

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If youre going to copy and paste something can you also link to or at least quote the source please.

 

Thank you.

 

Oops! copy and paste, bit beyond me that nikki, sounds like summat from a recipe book.. no, I got it from my daughter.

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The one thing we never ever had on tables in the fifties was elbows, hats and cell phones.

 

Ah!

"Get your elbows off the table!"

One of my old dad's favourites with me, I'm afraid!

Never did dare ask why it was so frowned on.

His other foible was that your knife and fork should be placed next to each other, handles towards you, when you'd finished eating....

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Ah!

"Get your elbows off the table!"

One of my old dad's favourites with me, I'm afraid!

Never did dare ask why it was so frowned on.

His other foible was that your knife and fork should be placed next to each other, handles towards you, when you'd finished eating....

 

 

And "please may I leave the table" at our house. Not a bad thing, considering the way kids nowadays roam around the table while everyone else is eating as though it were irrelevant.

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You were allowed to leave the table in our house when your plate was empty and everyone had finished eating too. No question of the plate being anything other than empty, we were always starving having played outside from coming home from school. We'd eat then "play out" until bedtime.

Duffems

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