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What is the strangest occurance you saw at work

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Worked at Sheffield Twist Drill which was next Door to James Neil. We heard that an apprentice fitter started at one and worked in the morning at James Neill and the afternoon at Sheffield Twist Drill.

As the place was like a warren caught the shop steward having a knee trembler on the stairs with a woman. He was coming up to retirement. think it was his retirement present.:hihi:

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Worked at Sheffield Twist Drill which was next Door to James Neil. We heard that an apprentice fitter started at one and worked in the morning at James Neill and the afternoon at Sheffield Twist Drill.

As the place was like a warren caught the shop steward having a knee trembler on the stairs with a woman. He was coming up to retirement. think it was his retirement present.:hihi:

 

That's a lot better than a watch

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Another cold rainy day at Steelos. We found a watchman's cabin with a fire and a tea boiler.

 

Our gang sat in there all morning playing cards, keeping an eye out for the chargehand who was looking for us.

 

Suddenly one lad stands up and looks at his watch.

 

"Hey!", he shouts, "It's bloody break time!" :)

Edited by trastrick

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There were some strange and wonderful characters at Orgreave Coke Ovens, one in particular, a tall swarthy man whose complexion suggested either Romany or ingrained coal dust. He was an introvert, a communist and a loner who spent most of the day muttering to himself. He always wore a Lenin-style peaked cap, which had written on the white band in childish block letters : MACHINE NOT THE MAN – KARL MARKS. A mis-quote from the mis-spelt founder of modern socialism. One day, high up in a dark concrete tower at Orgreave (sounds like a fairy tale) I came across a message written in chalk in large letters filling the entire wall. It wasn’t a poem, more like a manifesto, strange words and phrases making little sense but having a profound impact on me. Today, more than 40 years later, I can’t recall a single word of what I read but I knew who wrote it and I only wish I had copied it down. I’m certain a tee-shirt print would have outsold Che Guevara and made me a rich man.

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