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Old Sheffield tools

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I've just had a look on Google and come up with S & J's website: http://www.spear-and-jackson.com They do, indeed make panel saws (among many other tools) and a few smaller saws and other sundries under the Eclipse name.

 

---------- Post added 14-01-2018 at 23:53 ----------

 

I've rechecked the chisel, lazarus, and all that it has stamped on the back of the body, just before the tang, are the words "Ayrewood & Co, Sheffield". No logo or any other trade mark.

 

Looking at Footprint website and their history, had to laugh when I saw 1997 the introduction of plastic grips with hand guards on cold chisels. I could have had a lot less bruised bones and swellings on my left hand had they introduced them around 1960 lol. Also, I got to thinking about my first set of spanners, bought by my mum before I started my apprenticeship in1961. Gordon of Sheffield was the name, nothing but the best for her little darling.:D

Edited by Ontarian1981

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The firm at the end of Cricket Inn Road was J.Stead and Co Ltd and was a part of the Balfour Darwin Group. No idea when the Stead family sold out but it was ceetainly before 1959 when I started there in the Production Control Office

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I know exactly what you mean about protection from cold chisels. I had my apprenticeship, as a plater, at Markham & Co in Chesterfield (from 1967). Markham's were in the same group as Firth Brown. One day I was hammering away at a row of weld tacks when, after about a hour of this, I missed the end of the chisel. The ball-pein hammer head smashed into the end joint of my middle finger ripping it clean open! I still have the scar and it never regained full feeling! I would have loved a set of Gordon spanners; I had to make do with a set of hand-forged "rat-tails" (or "bodging" spanners), all BSW, for tightening up the nuts on ¾" to 1" bolts, or lining up rivet holes in plates. Happy days.

Edited by Duckfeet

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Are you sure they're Ayrewood & Co. If you google you can find tools by Eyre Wood & Co.

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Thanks for that, Jon26, I appreciate it. I have taken your advice and looked up Eyrewood & Co and found this link: https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/vintage-eyrewood-co-chisel-463821220 The chisel shown at the top of the page has an identical handle to mine. I have re-examined the stamp on my firmer chisel and it seems that the initial letter (E) is stylised and appears to be an A. It still has black scale inside the stamping that is not easy to polish out. Problem solved, you are a star. Thank you very much.

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Hi duckfeet,

re your mention of henry taylor tools, I worked there over 25yrs ago on spring hammers, when I started company was called aaron hildicks.

I believe they still use the acorn brand.

take a look at this,

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IMG_0477.JPG

 

Hi graystreet, Thank you for the clip on Henry Taylor's forge. It shows that hand-forged tools cannot be beaten. I've owned my HT carving chisel for years and it is simply unbeatable.

 

Above is a photograph of my Eyrewood & Co chisel, it shows that the initial 'E' can easily be mistaken for an 'A' (as I did).

 

[Or not, as the case may be! I don't know if it is possible to upload photographs on this forum.]

Edited by Duckfeet

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try the current custodians of the Hawley collection,i bet ken would have known the company.

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I have just started replacing all my substandard new mechanics tools with old mostly Sheffield made tools as the only tools i have that have stood the test of time are the ones i first bought over thirty years ago. If only we had only seen the importance of quality and brand loyalty a few years ago maybe some of our tool companies would have survived.Yes Duckfeet i live in Sweden also and are sick of the swedes telling me how good their tools are and how they think they invented everything !

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Hi zigzag. You are bang on about the quality of older tools, I am more than delighted with mine. The same goes for HSS twist drill bits. Those I've had for nearly 50 years still sharpen up great and outperform the modern rubbish. Swedes will always bang on about their stuff being better but my Swedish hand saws soon get blunt! I'm retired now but still like to use decent tools in one of my hobbies of timber sign-making. Whereabouts in Sweden do you live? I live in southern Skåne, north of Ystad.

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Hi zigzag. You are bang on about the quality of older tools, I am more than delighted with mine. The same goes for HSS twist drill bits. Those I've had for nearly 50 years still sharpen up great and outperform the modern rubbish. Swedes will always bang on about their stuff being better but my Swedish hand saws soon get blunt! I'm retired now but still like to use decent tools in one of my hobbies of timber sign-making. Whereabouts in Sweden do you live? I live in southern Skåne, north of Ystad.

 

I am in Nyköping Duckfeet a fair bit further north than your bit of Sweden..

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