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I have just had a letter back from Lloyds tsb with a successfull claim for ppi on a credit card going back to year 2000 with an offer.

What am i best doing? Accept/Decline?

I am perfectly happy as its nearly £5K but with not having done anything like this before i dont want to be ripped off any further monies that may be owed.

Is there any experts out there to help?

The offer is direct from my bank

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I have just had a letter back from Lloyds tsb with a successfull claim for ppi on a credit card going back to year 2000 with an offer.

What am i best doing? Accept/Decline?

I am perfectly happy as its nearly £5K but with not having done anything like this before i dont want to be ripped off any further monies that may be owed.

Is there any experts out there to help?

The offer is direct from my bank

 

Take it as the rates are set and are pretty standard- agents charge up to 40% fees.

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Take it and congratulate yourself that you get all the money and haven't got some third party taking a big chunk.A few months ago I got another cheque from bank appertaining to a payout I got a couple of years ago something to do with some intrest calculation which the banks have been forced to pay on past compensation but would imagine your settlement includes this.

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Take it and congratulate yourself that you get all the money and haven't got some third party taking a big chunk.A few months ago I got another cheque from bank appertaining to a payout I got a couple of years ago something to do with some intrest calculation which the banks have been forced to pay on past compensation but would imagine your settlement includes this.

 

It does include interest and i am certain at first look that i will almost certainly take it without disputing it as i thought it was all goverment backed and they couldnt swindle anymore but i wanted other peoples experiences first but i am overwhelmed at the amount ive been offered as i dont know how it works or how much i was paying!! lol

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Apologies about the nature of the thread folks...as if the onslaught of adds on TV/radio aren't enough, here's one to start your day on your very own SF! (But it is for my elderly mother!)

 

I'm not sure if anyone can help me, I've had a claim in for mis sold ppi regarding a loan my mother took out to start a business about 15 years ago.

 

The loan was for 15,500, taken out over a period of 60 months. The repayments were made each month from her business account & whilst the HSBC initially couldn't find any evidence of the loan due to the time scales involved, we managed to track down statements from this period to verify this, including when the loan was deposited into the account.

My mother clearly remembers being told that it was a condition of the loan than she take out insurance, despite the fact that my father had a joint life ins policy (with critical illness cover).

The insurance was paid from her personal account (Yorkshire Bank), again, statements submitted for this period clearly state 'Midland/HSBC ins' for the amount of £23.96 per month.

 

We've just had a letter back from the HSBC stating that the insurance does not relate to PPI, but a Life Assurance & critical illness cover.

I was led to believe that any insurance sold as an add on to cover repayments would be a valid claim, particularly as the policy was sold when my mother already had an existing joint policy & was told that it was a condition of the loan, & also, the duration of the insurance payments is the same for the loan repayments, 60 months.

 

So I'm unsure of what to do next, do I ask to see documentation supporting their claim...original contract etc?

I'm literally shooting in the dark here so any advice would be really greatly appreciated.

 

Many thanks.

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Take it. I got just over £4,000 from Halifax and didn't even have to ask for it. It just appeared in my account and I wondered where it had come from. The day after I got a letter explaining it was PPI & interest.

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We recently gave the go ahead to Solicitors to examine our old accounts and identify if the dreaded PPI was involved. It's on a no win no fee jobby, so there is nothing to lose. 30% of the "win" would go in fees though.

 

Just a thought, anyone been successful in the attempt to reclaim PPI.

 

Angel1.

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Yes but did mine through a template on money saver expert.

Both myself my wife and my son had money returned and did not have to pay anyone.

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We recently gave the go ahead to Solicitors to examine our old accounts and identify if the dreaded PPI was involved. It's on a no win no fee jobby, so there is nothing to lose. 30% of the "win" would go in fees though.

 

Just a thought, anyone been successful in the attempt to reclaim PPI.

 

Angel1.

 

Mate did his own and got £27000 back

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Did the same as Monkey104. Got about £ 9500 back across all PPI I had.

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Thanks for the reply's, seems it is worth doing then.

 

Angel1.

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I got about £4500 back through Lloyds bank, didnt have to lift a finger as they sorted it all for me.

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