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Grand Designs - Oughtibridge.

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I'm amazed they got planning permission

 

If the application complies will all the planning regulations in force at the time, why wouldn't it be granted?

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I’ve just had a look on google earth and it’s much better than was there before.

Also it was industrial usage before and now it houses 2 families.

What’s not to like?

With the lack of homes for people these days it’s been an improvement on the previous usage so why would it have not got planning permission?

The fact that we all have different likes and dislikes on what we would like our own homes to look like shouldn’t factor in this sort of decision. If rules were adhered to then what’s the issue?

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I'm amazed they got planning permission

 

Really? Personally I’m amazed that mass produced, low quality houses like those produced by Barrett, Redrow etc get planning permission. Those houses blight the peripheries of towns and cities whilst contributing absolutely nothing to the interest or aesthetic of an area. Furthermore, their contribution to the local economy is minimal.

 

Now compare that to the houses in Oughtibridge. Architects (local) commissioned by locals who then used local builders, steel works, kitchen manufacturers etc. I’d rather far more properties like those in Oughtibridge (with the supporting local contribution) and far fewer bland “executive” boxes.

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An imaginative contemporary addition to the surroundings, well done to all involved!

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The old corrugated steel sheds that were there before when Barbers had the yard looked a lot better than these monstrosities . What a blight on the landscape.

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Cladding on buildings is the ultimate insult to Architecture World wide .

Who trains these experts and then sends them out to inflict their weird designs on our City centres at the expense of the fine buildings they demolish to make way for them.

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Cladding on buildings is the ultimate insult to Architecture World wide .

Who trains these experts and then sends them out to inflict their weird designs on our City centres at the expense of the fine buildings they demolish to make way for them.

 

This is another topic really, but yes, look at the new Chinese quarter tower. Clad in pleasant colours it replaces a derelict square of land next to the Ant marketing building.

Instead of being clad, it could instead just be brick faced, or concrete... Or perhaps some variant of steel and glass...

Which would you prefer?

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Cladding on buildings is the ultimate insult to Architecture World wide .

 

It depends on the building and, of course, the cladding.

 

Many ugly 1960s and 1970s tower blocks have been given a more modern, refreshing and less brutal look with cladding.

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This is another topic really, but yes, look at the new Chinese quarter tower. Clad in pleasant colours it replaces a derelict square of land next to the Ant marketing building.

Instead of being clad, it could instead just be brick faced, or concrete... Or perhaps some variant of steel and glass...

Which would you prefer?

The next time a building that is faced in bricks ,stone or concrete and those materials are the cause of a major disaster such as Grenfell as well as others World wide tell me about it.

 

---------- Post added 30-10-2018 at 19:53 ----------

 

It depends on the building and, of course, the cladding.

 

Many ugly 1960s and 1970s tower blocks have been given a more modern, refreshing and less brutal look with cladding.

In some peoples opinion ,I my self think that the tower blocks as well as Park hill looked much better when fronted by their natural materials ,I.E. soft honey coloured brickwork , a material that presented no risk to those living in High rise.

 

---------- Post added 30-10-2018 at 21:12 ----------

 

The BBC are just showing a programme on two about cladding on public and social buildings.

Edited by Albert smith

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The next time a building that is faced in bricks ,stone or concrete and those materials are the cause of a major disaster such as Grenfell as well as others World wide tell me about it.

 

---------- Post added 30-10-2018 at 19:53 ----------

 

In some peoples opinion ,I my self think that the tower blocks as well as Park hill looked much better when fronted by their natural materials ,I.E. soft honey coloured brickwork , a material that presented no risk to those living in High rise.

 

---------- Post added 30-10-2018 at 21:12 ----------

 

The BBC are just showing a programme on two about cladding on public and social buildings.

 

You’re conflating two issues here. There’s the aesthetics of cladding as well as the performance of it. Cladding can make buildings look far superior to traditional building materials. However, poorly designed cladding systems can introduce an element of risk (which is compounded when testing processes are inadequate). Cladding doesn’t automatically increase the fire risk to a building.

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The next time a building that is faced in bricks ,stone or concrete and those materials are the cause of a major disaster such as Grenfell as well as others World wide tell me about it.[

 

That's a totally different argument. Nobody is going to disagree that cladding should meet building standards for not being flammable.

 

But going back to your first argument, "fine buildings being knocked down", did you have some examples?

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It used to have to blend in with other buildings before you could get planning permission in the past but obviously not anymore.

 

That has never been the case except in some Conservation areas.

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