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Gender Fluid etc, Opinions?

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7 hours ago, Baron99 said:

I suppose if you work in the Civil Service, you have to be a bit more formal. 

 

Apparently, civil servants are now sending emails & letting the recipients know how they are happy to be defined within the context of a reply or extended email chain. 

 

For example if it were me I'd put I'd happy to be referred to as 'Mr', 'He', 'Him'. 

 

Sure I read about the singer, Sam Smith who wants to be designated as 'They'?

 

 

I would just keep putting in the persons name rather than he/she/they. That is how I avoid saying the wrong thing anyway. 

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Actually it would be helpful for people to add their designated pronoun, especially in business emails. 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51331571

 

It would help not to cause offence & stop over familiarity, where everyone believes they're your 'mate' these days.  The way we are now, mis-genedering someone can lead to a load of unwanted, distracting pulavah. 

 

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4 hours ago, Baron99 said:

Actually it would be helpful for people to add their designated pronoun, especially in business emails. 

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-51331571

 

It would help not to cause offence & stop over familiarity, where everyone believes they're your 'mate' these days.  The way we are now, mis-genedering someone can lead to a load of unwanted, distracting pulavah. 

 

Dear Baron 99,

 

This is how I would address a business email to you. Calling you by your first name/nickname that you were given and you keep using is neither offensive nor overly familiar. In this way, I am also avoiding using gender related pronouns and status related titles (such as Miss, Mrs.) which are totally irrelevant to most of the businesses. Thank you for understanding.

 

Sincerely,

 

Branyy.

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I only use Dear Alex or Dear Mrs Smith to address a person in a letter or email if I personally know that person.  Dear Sir, Dear Madam and Dear Miss are used when writing letters or emails to people I personally don't know.

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On 24/12/2019 at 16:54, Chez2 said:

I would just keep putting in the persons name rather than he/she/they. That is how I avoid saying the wrong thing anyway. 

I don’t even think about it.

 

if someone came up to me and said would you mind referring to me as “he” rather than “she” when you email me I would say fine and do so.

 

if I wasn’t informed and I made a mistake it not end of world is it?

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1 hour ago, makapaka said:

I don’t even think about it.

 

if someone came up to me and said would you mind referring to me as “he” rather than “she” when you email me I would say fine and do so.

 

if I wasn’t informed and I made a mistake it not end of world is it?

I think it has gone a bit crazy; the definition of gender has changed so much in the last few decades that its a bit of a misnomer. It means different things to different generations of people that are currently using the term. I think reference to gender should be scrapped altogether. In my experience, having listened to some people facing these issues with family and friends, some are using gender when they really are trying to describe what sex they are or identify as rather than gender. I'm not talking about sexual orientation either, that's a totally different issue. 

 

I agree with you in that I wouldn't mind if asked but if you don't know the person you have to guess based on their appearance; these days its so worrying you may inadvertently caused offence. Its very difficult to address someone correctly on the phone or on email if you are not aware of their situation. A couple of times I have asked for someone with a typical female name, not one that can sometimes be used for both sexes and it has been a very masculine voice. Some people look very androgynous so that can be difficult guessing how to address them. It makes no difference to me if I know the situation, I would rather not cause any offence to anyone but I get fed up of having it shoved in my face though. I don't see why it has to be at the forefront of discussion all the time. It shouldn't make any difference to any platonic relationship or business relationship. If it were me, I would rather get on my life without having to make such a song and dance about it all the time. 

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A 23-year-old woman who is taking legal action against an NHS gender clinic says she should have been challenged more by medical staff over her decision to transition to a male as a teenager.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51676020

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10 hours ago, El Cid said:

A 23-year-old woman who is taking legal action against an NHS gender clinic says she should have been challenged more by medical staff over her decision to transition to a male as a teenager.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51676020

Couldn’t make it up.

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On 01/03/2020 at 00:25, El Cid said:

A 23-year-old woman who is taking legal action against an NHS gender clinic says she should have been challenged more by medical staff over her decision to transition to a male as a teenager.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51676020

And people wonder why the NHS has funding issues? 

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On 01/03/2020 at 00:25, El Cid said:

A 23-year-old woman who is taking legal action against an NHS gender clinic says she should have been challenged more by medical staff over her decision to transition to a male as a teenager.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51676020

I heard an interview with this person on the radio today and she is also calling into question why further decisions made as an adult weren’t questioned. She seemed to be saying that mental health pre exists requests for gender reassignment and this leads people into decisions which are wrong for them and advocates mental health treatment before anything else. Can you imagine the outcry if the NHS took this approach- seems they’re  damned whichever the route they take

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On 01/03/2020 at 00:25, El Cid said:

A 23-year-old woman who is taking legal action against an NHS gender clinic says she should have been challenged more by medical staff over her decision to transition to a male as a teenager.

 

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/health-51676020

 

11 hours ago, WokeyMcWokeface said:

And people wonder why the NHS has funding issues? 

The NHS should wait until the individual is at least 18 years old before they start any transitional treatment.  18 is arguably also too early an age for individuals having transitional treatment.

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