Jump to content

The Consequences of Brexit (part 3)

Recommended Posts

Yes.

 

They're asking for us to contribute to the ongoing operational costs of an organisation we shall no longer be part of. It's silly.

 

So the negotiations will start with the UK telling the EU not to be silly?,bearing in mind that the UK has less than 2 years to conclude a deal.

 

https://www.theguardian.com/politics/2017/mar/22/eus-chief-negotiator-sets-three-conditions-for-brexit-trade-talks-to-start

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jennifer Rankin in Brussels

Wednesday 22 March 2017 15.00 GMT Last modified on Wednesday 22 March 2017 15.02 GMT

The EU’s chief divorce negotiator, Michel Barnier, is calling for an “orderly” Brexit and insisting Britain must settle its EU debts and resolve uncertainty for European citizens before talks can begin on a trade deal.

 

In only his second public statement on Brexit since he took up the position last autumn, Barnier will stress that the UK must “settle its accounts” as it leaves the EU, a slapdown of British claims that the UK could leave without paying a penny.

 

“When a country leaves the union, there is no punishment,” he is expected to say. “There is no price to pay to leave, but we must settle the accounts. We will not ask the British to pay a single euro for something they have not agreed to as a member.”

 

 

The UK and the rest of the EU would both lose out if there was no deal, but the UK will be hardest hit, he will say. “At the end of the day, we will both need – you and us – a united Europe to reach a deal.”

 

In a speech to the committee of the regions, a little-known EU institution intended to give a voice to local and regional leaders, Barnier will spell out that Brexit talks will have to make progress in three areas before negotiations on a future trading relationship can begin. The three areas are money, citizens’ rights and the Irish border.

 

His Brexit timetable is a firm rebuff to the British government’s hopes of running talks on the divorce and trade deal in parallel.

Edited by chalga

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So the negotiations will start with the UK telling the EU not to be silly?,bearing in mind that the UK has less than 2 years to conclude a deal.

 

Yes. They will.

 

If we continue to participate in certain programs, we should continue to pay into those programs directly. We should not pay anything to the EU itself.

Edited by unbeliever

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Yes. They will.

 

If we continue to participate in certain programs, we should continue to pay into those programs directly. We should not pay anything to the EU itself.

 

Straight to WTO then,cut out the timewasting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Straight to WTO then,cut out the timewasting.

 

We'll see.

 

.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We'll see.

 

.

 

Going to grab my popcorn and watch the poor get poorer and then complain about how their benefits aren't enough.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Going to grab my popcorn and watch the poor get poorer and then complain about how their benefits aren't enough.

maybe their benefits will be ok now we not paying out to the rest of the eu/immigrants:roll:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
We'll see.
Bricking it Hedging your bets, much? :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Well nothing is ever irrevocable.

Untrue; death is, for instance, at least for the foreseeable future.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Poland looks to be 2nd according to that link, with 800,000 Poles in the UK (source). So 1.2m Brits across the EU vs 0.8m Poles in the UK (for context).

 

These figures still do not look right to me. Firstly, there are Poles working in other EU states as well. Secondly, Poland has a population of around 40 million, compared to 65 million in the UK. Also, a substantial proportion of Brits living abroad are retirees, not workers, and so are unlikely to be a drain on the welfare systems of the host countries. Moreover, I think that it is likely that citizens of the Baltic states account for proportionally a higher figure than either Poland or the UK.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
These figures still do not look right to me. Firstly, there are Poles working in other EU states as well. Secondly, Poland has a population of around 40 million, compared to 65 million in the UK. Also, a substantial proportion of Brits living abroad are retirees, not workers, and so are unlikely to be a drain on the welfare systems of the host countries. Moreover, I think that it is likely that citizens of the Baltic states account for proportionally a higher figure than either Poland or the UK.

 

So,we've got from 'reciprocal health care' to 'a drain on the welfare systems of host countries'............what was that you were saying about the public understanding if it was explained to them clearly?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
These figures still do not look right to me. Firstly, there are Poles working in other EU states as well. Secondly, Poland has a population of around 40 million, compared to 65 million in the UK. Also, a substantial proportion of Brits living abroad are retirees, not workers, and so are unlikely to be a drain on the welfare systems of the host countries. Moreover, I think that it is likely that citizens of the Baltic states account for proportionally a higher figure than either Poland or the UK.

According to the Guardian the U.K. Paid out 670 million to other EU countries for Brits healthcare, while getting back less than 50 million from those countries for healthcare here. Which seems a bit disproportionate taking into account the number of brits living and working abroad and the number of EU citizens here.

Probably because most of us who go abroad on holiday take out insurance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.