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No planning permission - consequences?

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I would imagine that if the openings go most or all of the way across the width of the house then they surely must have had some compliance with building regulations sorted so that if they sell the buyer can be reasonably confident that the back wall isn't going to collapse without warning. Surely, their builder will have advised them of that?

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My grandmother has just had new windows , made into larger doors etc , there was no planning permission needed, We checked it out with the council first

 

I have had 3 properties done in the last 4 years new windows and doors all done by a window / door firm . Global Windows Handsworth . After completion i get a certificate to say they have notified the local building control of work done. [ Building Control Compliance Certificate ] . I suggest you ask your installer for one . There are regulations that say you have to have certain opening lights for safety fire escape etc.:suspect::suspect:

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I have had 3 properties done in the last 4 years new windows and doors all done by a window / door firm . Global Windows Handsworth . After completion i get a certificate to say they have notified the local building control of work done. [ Building Control Compliance Certificate ] . I suggest you ask your installer for one . There are regulations that say you have to have certain opening lights for safety fire escape etc.:suspect::suspect:

 

And building regulations that specify the support needed for walls that have alterations made to them. These specifications depend on the weight of the wall that needs to be supported.

 

What is your interest in this Poppet 2 ? Is your house attached to the one that has been altered ?

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Chances are nothing will happen unless the person comes to sell the house, and even then the buyers will take out indemnity insurance and that will be that.

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Chances are nothing will happen unless the person comes to sell the house, and even then the buyers will take out indemnity insurance and that will be that.

 

And when the insurers notify the buyer and mortgage lender there is no planning or building control on the property what do you thinks happens next. They will stick a building notice on the property and they will not be able to sell the house until work has been done :hihi::hihi:

Not notiyfing freehold owners / planning / buildind control is stupid do not think it is okay

Edited by spider1

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My neighbour has completed building work on his house and demolished his external garden window and door at the rear of the house and replaced these with large sliding glass doors instead. He has also blocked up two other external garden windows and a door. I have been informed that no planning permission or building regulations were given or involved during this work.

What is the least the planning department can do when they discover no planning permission was given?

 

Sounds like a great place to live, do you keep a diary of all comings and goings too :rolleyes:

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And when the insurers notify the buyer and mortgage lender there is no planning or building control on the property what do you thinks happens next. They will stick a building notice on the property and they will not be able to sell the house until work has been done :hihi::hihi:

Not notiyfing freehold owners / planning / buildind control is stupid do not think it is okay

 

nah usually it falls on the buyer to sort the mess out, with a reduction in the sale price to cover fee's.

 

Happens more often than you'd think, shouldn't do really but it does.

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nah usually it falls on the buyer to sort the mess out, with a reduction in the sale price to cover fee's.

 

Happens more often than you'd think, shouldn't do really but it does.

 

Yes correct it does but the seller has to reduce price by a few thousand not a few hundred as it would cost to obtain planning etc not notyfying the freeholder of any thing can cost a couple of thousand alone not worth the agro walk away i would his mess let him sort it :hihi:

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What is your interest in this Poppet2? Is your house attached to the one that has been altered ?

 

Yes, I'm afraid so. :(

 

---------- Post added 14-03-2017 at 12:20 ----------

 

Yes correct it does but the seller has to reduce price by a few thousand not a few hundred as it would cost to obtain planning etc not notyfying the freeholder of any thing can cost a couple of thousand alone not worth the agro walk away i would his mess let him sort it :hihi:

 

But if the new buyer goes ahead and tries to sort it out, even with indemnity insurance, is there a chance the council could still refuse the alterations even under restrospective planning permission, and demand the property be returned to its original state?

Edited by poppet2

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Yes, I'm afraid so. :(

 

---------- Post added 14-03-2017 at 12:20 ----------

 

 

But if the new buyer goes ahead and tries to sort it out, even with indemnity insurance, is there a chance the council could still refuse the alterations even under restrospective planning permission, and demand the property be returned to its original state?

 

Is the work causing any damage to your house or are you just wanting to snitch on your neighbour?

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Is the work causing any damage to your house or are you just wanting to snitch on your neighbour?

 

Yes.

Why? Do you believe that people should flout planning permission? Isn't that why planning rules exist, to protect other people's property, in addition to one's own? Why bother have any laws in society if people refuse to obey them. I notice you disagreed with someone burning garden rubbish, which was against council bye-laws, on another thread today, yet this is far more serious.

Edited by poppet2

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Yes, I'm afraid so. :(

 

---------- Post added 14-03-2017 at 12:20 ----------

 

 

But if the new buyer goes ahead and tries to sort it out, even with indemnity insurance, is there a chance the council could still refuse the alterations even under restrospective planning permission, and demand the property be returned to its original state?

 

You would to ask them that but it wouldnt be the first time they have made someone pull a house down built without planning :hihi:

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