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Women who swear in public

mort

If you cannot refrain from bickering and insulting each other then I suggest you don't post. If you cannot get along with another user then put them on ignore. If you continue with the insults then I will be suspending accounts. 

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38 minutes ago, ECCOnoob said:

Yeah well done for ignoring my words of "communications between ADULTS" 

 

Stop trying to sidetrack.  

Sorry I got it wrong ,I thought that you were just like the low life I hear every day uffing and tuffing in front of all and sundry inc in front of Children and Ladies , sorry again .

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In days gone by the local plod wouldve have them (male or female) dragged by the earlobe to the parents but, these days the parents think its funny.

Isnt it a public order offence to swear in public?

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15 hours ago, ECCOnoob said:

Your opinion is wholly outdated.

 

To think that such so-called 'foul language' is restricted to building sites and the factory floor is absolutely naive.

 

Working a legal office I hear and use such language communicated around all the time.  In casual conversation staff say it, clients say it and opponents say it.   It's a perfectly legitimate way of expressing urgency, anger, frustration or as a emphasis on the gravity of a situation.

 

Such language is used by journalists, academics, medical practitioners, in the written print, on television and in everyday communication between adults.  To dismiss all these people as low life slobs is absolutely ridiculous.

 

You say that bloody, bleedin' , sod and git are all acceptable - I would like to know who created this rule?    After all, those words along with the f word and c word are all in the same dictionary.  Who the hell says that the first four are acceptable but the other two aren't.     What exactly gives them and you the right to judge other people's use of it.   

 

I don't know how many more times I have to say this, language evolves.   The tolerance of this evolution of language shifts all the time, the broadcasting rules shift all the time, the watershed rules shift all the time to evolve with it.  

 

If you don't like to hear it, that's your opinion and that's fine. However you have no right to be judging others or making derogatory comments for their own choices. 

 

You've mentioned this office environment before, but it sounds entirely alien to me.

I'm self employed, I've worked in many office environments all over the country, and I rarely hear anyone swearing and never in a client meeting.

 

Such language isn't commonly used by the majority of people at all.  Perhaps your sample includes more lowlife slobs than you realise.

 

What gives us the right to judge other people on how they communicate, particularly with us?  Well, judging is what people do, all the time, consciously and unconsciously.  I'm judging you right now for your defence of the use of bad language and your claims that it's normal.  I don't need a special right to judge, I'm just doing.

Ironic that you generously allow people to have an opinion, but then declare that they aren't allowed to judge.

News flash, you aren't in control of everyone else, and they are all judging you, whether you like it or not.  They might even make derogatory comments (again, the irony, you want to stop them doing that), they'll probably make them without resorting to swearing though.

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There’s nothing wrong with swearing in the right environment and context.

 

theyre just words at the end of the day.

 

they don’t sound nice coming from children mainly because some of the words have an underlying sexual background which is why they sound awful when kids say them.

 

I think that it is widespread and pretending that only “lowlife slobs” swear is naive and also quite snobbish - which is a trait quite a few people show on here whilst pretending to be beacons of equality. 

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I think that we're all free to make value judgements about the people we meet.  I don't like people who swear casually in conversation, that could only be snobbish if you agree that swearing is an indicator of being lower class, which you just disputed.

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3 hours ago, Cyclone said:

I think that we're all free to make value judgements about the people we meet.  I don't like people who swear casually in conversation, that could only be snobbish if you agree that swearing is an indicator of being lower class, which you just disputed.

It is not very often I am in tune with you Cyclone but on this one its 100%.

Mind you I notice that the bad language in general conversation is now just has prevalent in the professional classes as the working people , I also know that in working class homes where I mostly tread if some one starts using bad language they would be shown the door double quick. Standards have dropped now wherever we live and work and that is a shame.

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Yes, I have to admit I agree with Cyclone too on this one, and it's not often I'd say that. Although he has managed to form an opinion on something without backing up with scientific studies.

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7 hours ago, Cyclone said:

I think that we're all free to make value judgements about the people we meet.  I don't like people who swear casually in conversation, that could only be snobbish if you agree that swearing is an indicator of being lower class, which you just disputed.

I just wonder who the lowlife slobs you are referring to - are these the swearing professionals?

 

im amazed someone could form a dislike for someone for using a swear word in conversation - seems petty.

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13 minutes ago, makapaka said:

I just wonder who the lowlife slobs you are referring to - are these the swearing professionals?

 

im amazed someone could form a dislike for someone for using a swear word in conversation - seems petty.

Using a swear word in certain situations and conversations has become more acceptable across the spectrum, sometimes employed to illustrate an emotion, make a point, or be amusing.  My experience suggests people who have a decent grasp of language will sometimes include swear words into an otherwise erudite conversation, after judging the appropriateness.

 

 Using the same swear word(s) constantly, regardless of topic, audience or surroundings is very different.  That shows a complete disregard for others, a lack of vocabulary, or perhaps unawareness or habit if its been the norm in someone's background/upbringing.  Thats the kind of swearing I've heard some adults use around small children, sometimes quite aggressively.  It always sounds unpleasant in those circumstances.

Edited by Ms Macbeth

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One of my pet hates is when I have picked the kids up from school and hear some of the parents swearing, usually at a fair volume too, sounds horrible.

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I tend to form judgments on people’s characters based on the point of what they’re saying rather than the words they use.

 

obviously to an extent.

 

id be more inclined to associate with someone who referred to someone as an effin racist than a non-swearing racist (for example).

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