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Women who swear in public

mort

If you cannot refrain from bickering and insulting each other then I suggest you don't post. If you cannot get along with another user then put them on ignore. If you continue with the insults then I will be suspending accounts. 

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What a sexist old load of tripe. This is 2017 and women aren't subject to the patriarchal garbage spouted by the OP anymore.

 

P.S. The argument that those who swear do so because they have a limited vocabulary is a bag of. I've got a colossal vocabulary and I love swearing.

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What a sexist old load of tripe. This is 2017 and women aren't subject to the patriarchal garbage spouted by the OP anymore.

 

P.S. The argument that those who swear do so because they have a limited vocabulary is a bag of. I've got a colossal vocabulary and I love swearing.

 

Doesn't alter that it's uncouth and often unnecessary, that applies to people though, not just women and not just men.

 

---------- Post added 15-03-2017 at 08:42 ----------

 

Swearing doesn't really bother me, it's just words, I can't see what all the fuss is about. If women feel like swearing, and in the current climate i can see why they might, that's up to them.

 

Like everything else, clothes, demeanor, it's just one more factor by which you initially judge people.

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What a sexist old load of tripe. This is 2017 and women aren't subject to the patriarchal garbage spouted by the OP anymore.

 

P.S. The argument that those who swear do so because they have a limited vocabulary is a bag of. I've got a colossal vocabulary and I love swearing.

 

Do you vary your level of swearing according to the people you are with at the time?

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How did we get to 2 pages without anyone pointing out the superb sexism?

 

Oh we did, I missed Halibut's reply.

 

Regardless, study after study has shown people who swear have a larger vocabulary and have higher intelligence than those who don't, but I think someone who is unable to curb their language out of respect for others isn't a very nice person, male or female. I swear plenty, but I'd try not to swear loudly in public, especially if children were around, a pub in the evening might be different. For me that's the problem, it's not with swearing per se, it's just another continuation of the trend of not giving 2 hoots about anyone else and making no effort to accommodate others.

 

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/09/27/swear-words-intelligence_n_12213206.html

https://www.sciencealert.com/people-who-curse-a-lot-have-better-vocabularies-than-those-who-don-t-study-finds

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Weird, because all the Doctorates I know swear very little in day to conversation.

Yet, if you catch the wrong bus or hang out in the wrong part of town, you can hear people who don't really look very clever, but can't say a single sentence without a liberal amount of effing and jeffing in it.

Are those people actually more intelligent than the ones with PhDs?

 

Ah, well, looking closer.

 

Researchers at Marist College in New York say a big vocabulary of curse words is a sign of higher rhetorical skill, and those that can name the most swear words in one minute tend to have a greater overall vocabulary.

 

Those who KNOW the most swear words and can identify the most in one minute have a larger overall vocabulary. That says nothing about how often they use them whilst drinking cider in the park or indeed whilst at work or whilst with their family.

 

And whilst we're looking at the research

 

They ended up coming up with 533 taboo words, including lesser-known words such as "ass pirate."

That's not a word. It's two words, it's not swearing at all, it's possibly a derogatory term and demonstrating homophobia (depends on context I guess, but it's akin to calling someone gay as an insult).

 

So in summary, people with larger vocabularies know more curse words (and phrases) as well as knowing more common words. That doesn't mean that they use them regularly though.

Edited by Cyclone

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Weird, because all the Doctorates I know swear very little in day to conversation.

Yet, if you catch the wrong bus or hang out in the wrong part of town, you can hear people who don't really look very clever, but can't say a single sentence without a liberal amount of effing and jeffing in it.

Are those people actually more intelligent than the ones with PhDs?

 

Ah, well, looking closer.

 

 

 

Those who KNOW the most swear words and can identify the most in one minute have a larger overall vocabulary. That says nothing about how often they use them whilst drinking cider in the park or indeed whilst at work or whilst with their family.

 

And whilst we're looking at the research

 

 

That's not a word. It's two words, it's not swearing at all, it's possibly a derogatory term and demonstrating homophobia (depends on context I guess, but it's akin to calling someone gay as an insult).

 

So in summary, people with larger vocabularies know more curse words (and phrases) as well as knowing more common words. That doesn't mean that they use them regularly though.

 

In all seriousness, I can't see any links to swearing and intelligence in real life at all. Some very bright people I know, PhDs plus some swear like it's going out of fashion, others don't swear in the slightest. Perhaps it's more of a 'field' things, IT workers tend to swear more than other professions?

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I rarely hear swearing at work, perhaps it depends on the company.

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I rarely hear swearing at work, perhaps it depends on the company.

 

Perhaps, on the rare occasion I go to the office there is plenty of swearing, but I guess that's because the office handles live service and incident management, so it's a highly stressful role. Doesn't excuse it though and actually it's been highlighted as a part of the reason why we have so few females who work in this part of the company. More than one stated that the office culture and language including sexist 'banter' was the main reason for leaving.

 

I'm not condoning swearing in public like that at all, and I've said already that people who cannot control their language are probably neither very intelligent or nice. Unless they have Tourette's.

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What a sexist old load of tripe. This is 2017 and women aren't subject to the patriarchal garbage spouted by the OP anymore

 

P.S. The argument that those who swear do so because they have a limited vocabulary is a bag of. I've got a colossal vocabulary and I love swearing.

 

Oh fish off

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Hearing it at home normalises it. I hear it on public transport from all sorts of people, but mainly younger ones. Often sitting in the priority seats, when it's fairly obvious they don't need to. It appears to be the only adjective some know. Sad.

 

I agree with that. My parents never used anything stronger than "bloody" or "chuff" at home in front of us kids.

 

We've never used foul language in front of our kids. We know it exists - they know it exists - if we go to the football match we hear it all around us - but we've never "normalised it" in the home and they don't use it in front of us either.

 

---------- Post added 17-03-2017 at 06:16 ----------

 

It sounds like you were the man jilted by the 'Thing' . But you had a lucky escape sir. Imagine taking her back to the in-laws .

'Mum and Dad I'd like you to meet The Thing''

She says ' pleased to <removed> meet yah'

Don't give your parents an early grave :o

 

:hihi:

 

I can assure you I was not the man jilted by "The Thing". Funny scenario though!

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