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Using Mobile Phones While Driving - New Laws

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The passenger in the car is likely to be more aware of the surroundings and what is happening than someone on the phone. Unless of course the person on the phone is in the back seat, the ultimate back seat driver :)

 

And, conversely, the car driver on the phone by whatever means (hands-free or not) is less likely to spot the filtering cyclist, motor bike, last-second pedestrian dashed in my opinion.

 

---------- Post added 16-09-2018 at 07:03 ----------

 

Not just new laws, new technology:

 

https://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/uk-world-news/speed-camera-phone-speeding-offences-15146448

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Yet just a few months ago:

 

Quote

Our recent study has found that the primarily cognitive secondary task of talking on a hands-free device does not appear to have any detrimental effects," said Tom Dingus, director of VTTI and the principal investigator of the study.

Safe to use hands-free devices in the car? Yes, suggests new research

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One comment on the story seems abit telling:

 

Quote

Good luck anyone trying to find original source research on this since neither ROSPA nor the MP's made the attempt, but one [ironic] link is:
https://www.monash.edu/news/articles/children-more-distracting-than-mobile-phones

Most of the refs appear to refer to data from 1990's or 2000's, hardly valid with modern kit, or have NO evidence.

Poor reporting on a lazy commitee of MP's.

 

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On 13/09/2018 at 11:10, Cyclone said:

So if it's in a cradle you can actually poke at it. Good to know.

My Sat Nav software specifically warns against adjusting any settings whilst driving. Might be a bit of a problem convincing the police and/or insurance company that you were driving safely if specifically ignoring the instructions

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Good luck trying to police a ban on hands free.

 

My phone is automatically blue toothed to my car stereo and is usually in my inside pocket. The only sign that I am engaged in a phone call would be my mouth moving which could just as easily be me singing along to my iPod.

 

Slight thread drift here, but I was at a services once parked near a guy who was changing his rear wheel. He was talking to his missus through his car stereo, who was ringing him to find out why he was late home. She was giving him all sorts of earache which could be clearly heard by everyone within 50 feet of his car. 😂🤣😂

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48 minutes ago, Eater Sundae said:

My Sat Nav software specifically warns against adjusting any settings whilst driving. Might be a bit of a problem convincing the police and/or insurance company that you were driving safely if specifically ignoring the instructions

Mine says that then presents me with a screen that won’t go away unless I jab at a small box with my finger.

 

Im not sure a phonecall (handsfree) is any worse than unruly kids, animals, drunk people and - in standing traffic only - an air drum solo. Are we being softened up for expensive driverless cars?

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19 minutes ago, tinfoilhat said:

Mine says that then presents me with a screen that won’t go away unless I jab at a small box with my finger.

 

Im not sure a phonecall (handsfree) is any worse than unruly kids, animals, drunk people and - in standing traffic only - an air drum solo. Are we being softened up for expensive driverless cars?

Doubtful, just some snowflake somewhere with time on their hands. It would be un Police able any way.

 

Angel1

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They're saying hands free phone calls, while driving, are now not safe! (has been on news today, sorry don't have a link or soure).

 

Just wondering how the police and ambulance service will cope without being able to stay in voice contact with base, while driving?! I mean, if it's not safe for the public, it's not safe for people at work? Surely?

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8 minutes ago, Waldo said:

They're saying hands free phone calls, while driving, are now not safe! (has been on news today, sorry don't have a link or soure).

 

Just wondering how the police and ambulance service will cope without being able to stay in voice contact with base, while driving?! I mean, if it's not safe for the public, it's not safe for people at work? Surely?

Does not matter if they bring it in or not ,people will continue to use their phones while driving .i see loads everyday .police would be exempt as their radios don’t come in the same  category anyway 

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The proponents argue it still causes distractions, but so does a car full of people who are shouting or screaming.

 

Or a couple arguing whilst one is driving.

 

Hands free in my opinion is safe- could it be made safer, perhaps yes and it's that what should be considered.

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2 minutes ago, rudds1 said:

Does not matter if they bring it in or not ,people will continue to use their phones while driving .i see loads everyday .police would be exempt as their radios don’t come in the same  category anyway 

It's in the same category of "having a hands free conversation with another person who isn't sat in the car with you". Which is, as I understand it, what they're saying is dangerous.

 

I believe you're right though, police etc, will be exempt, and they'll make up some reason why it's safe for them, but not us.

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