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Dear Forum.. Do police interviews show up on checks?

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Dear Forum, the police will hold whatever records they see fit to hold on you, it is up to you to request to see those records ( a fee may be involved ) . I would think if you were interviewed the a record is held on your file, regarding the interview.

 

A common misconception regarding the disclosure procedure is that powers that be can release any details held.

 

This is incorrect...for example....if you beat up a person, go to court and admit your offence, regardless of the circumstances, you have shown honesty.

 

You then apply for a job in a supermarket on the till , the powers that be cannot say that you are a dishonest person and may pose a risk to the takings of the shop.

 

The disclosure procedure quite rightly is only relevant for the purpose of the position applied for.

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convictions i think only, ive been done loads of times for things but not many convictions, not much shows up ;)

 

I thought you were a Saint: gag:

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I will NOT show on a DBS check, however if you require Developed Vetting clearance at any point then it likely will if the police force have kept the records. However, DV clearance involves a thorough interview and examination of the risk you offer, therefore even if this was disclosed it would likely be irrelevant to any clearance being granted.

 

I have reasonable experience of the DBS and DV systems through my work.

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I wouldn't be so sure of that;

 

"Each Police Force maintains a local record of information, which can be used to disclose information referred to on a disclosure in the ‘other relevant information’ section on an enhanced check. This is formally known as ‘approved information’. It is often more commonly referred to as ‘non-conviction information’ or ‘police intelligence’.

 

It normally relates to somebody who has never actually been convicted for the offence involved, but can also sometimes include additional information relating to a conviction.

 

What ‘local police information’ means

 

For the purposes of this page, local police information can include:

Fixed Penalty Notices (FPN’s)

Penalty Notices for Disorder (PND’s)

Findings of innocence

Acquittals

Cautions and convictions of those that you live with

Other Police intelligence (including allegations).

 

http://hub.unlock.org.uk/knowledgebase/local-police-information-2/

 

the police used to have to destroy evidence against non convicted people but this changed after Ian Huntly-who had multiple contacts with the police over sexual offences that did not lead to charges would have had a clean DRB-but got a job as a school caretaker and we all know the consequences then.

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Surely if they were to reveal that you had been accused and questioned, it would ALSO reveal that the outcome was determined that there was no case to answer? Being accused and questioned is not at all the same thing as being found at fault, and any report on your contact with the police should reflect that.

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Surely if they were to reveal that you had been accused and questioned, it would ALSO reveal that the outcome was determined that there was no case to answer? Being accused and questioned is not at all the same thing as being found at fault, and any report on your contact with the police should reflect that.

 

Whilst this is undeniably true, there is a complication.

 

In a child protection setting, any contact with adults must be risk assessed. Part of this is the information from a DBS check. Imagine a scenario where someone was DBS checked, an interview with police was shown and the person was still employed. If they then committed an offence, the press would have a field day. For that reason, I'd imagine that an interview showing on a DBS could adversely affect an individual's employement prospects.

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Whilst this is undeniably true, there is a complication.

 

In a child protection setting, any contact with adults must be risk assessed. Part of this is the information from a DBS check. Imagine a scenario where someone was DBS checked, an interview with police was shown and the person was still employed. If they then committed an offence, the press would have a field day. For that reason, I'd imagine that an interview showing on a DBS could adversely affect an individual's employement prospects.

 

After Ian Huntley I expect thats very much the case. He was never charged and hence got to work in a secondary school which shouldn't have happened.

 

---------- Post added 14-11-2016 at 18:25 ----------

 

the police used to have to destroy evidence against non convicted people but this changed after Ian Huntly-who had multiple contacts with the police over sexual offences that did not lead to charges would have had a clean DRB-but got a job as a school caretaker and we all know the consequences then.

 

Well...whilst that's true he wasn't the caretaker at Holly and Jessica's school. Maxine Carr worked at their school. He should never have been allowed to work in a school but the fact he passed the background check didn't lead to Holly and Jessica's deaths.

Edited by Santo

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Dear Forum,

Some of the info given to you on this thread isn't correct

It won't show on any DBS printout....but you have no means of getting the police to delete any reference to it on their systems...even if you pay ! The police will never delete things such as 'drug markers' against people/addresses/vehicles or domestic violence and a whole raft of other 'alleged' incidents etc on their systems

Also (slight thread drift) if you apply for, say, an ESTA entry to the US it asks if you've ever been arrested - not charged or convicted- for various offences eg Possess Class B- many students don't realise that this could stuff any future career in the US

Fortunately the OP was interv as a 'volunteer'

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