Jump to content RIP Sheffield Admin Mort

Hybrid vehicles question

Recommended Posts

Diesel is going to get more and more expensive to run for environmental reasons IMO.

Do you not get battery charging from regeneration when you use the brakes?

 

 

Sorry for been late replying to your post. Yes it has regeneration from the brakes. Drive without pressing any buttons and every time you break it regenerates very lightly. Pressing the regeneration button (5 settings) gives you mild regen 1 or press it 5 times and it gives high regen. 2, 3, and 4 are just variables between 1 & 5. It's good in mode 5 going down steep steep hills as it literally holds the car back, no need to use the brakes.

 

Angel1.

 

---------- Post added 22-11-2016 at 19:42 ----------

 

Toyota makes the RAV4 electric car, which travels for up to 125 miles per charge. Its EPA rated driving range is 95 miles.

Some RAV4 EVs have been driven more than 150,000 miles (240,000 km) using the original battery pack.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyota_RAV4_EV

 

 

Let me tell you a story. My car is advertised as good for 160 MPG. But 25 on electric and the battery has gone. 30 on petrol driving steady. Added together that's 55 MPG, I will be generous, say 50 on petrol plus 25 on electric = 75 MPG. Where on earth is the stated 160 MPG. And at 66 years old I drive it like the accelerator is made of egg shells, very very lightly.

If you are considering a Toyota RAV4 electric, I would advise you to go on an extended test drive, find out for yourself if 95/125 miles is achievable. Bet you a tenner it's not.

 

Angel1.

 

---------- Post added 22-11-2016 at 19:45 ----------

 

It only travel 25 mile on a battery charge?

 

 

Yes, driving really steady. I can imagine if you drove it hard it would pull it down to mid teens 14/15 maybe.

 

Angel1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
It's pretty clear that we'll all be driving battery cars soon.

The environmental case is "settled" so you can't argue against them even if you're right to do so.

The high cost is down to battery wear. That should be resolved in a couple of generations of battery R&D, as the latest Teslas can do 5000 cycles (up from 300 not all that long ago).

The only viable solution to the slowness and battery wear associated with "fast charging" is a swap-out system. Basically when you pull into the filling station they don't charge your battery, they swap it for charged one.

The current round of battery cars don't allow for this, but I pretty confident it's coming.

We're approaching the tipping point where battery cars may be slightly cheaper than petrol (partly due to state intervention) for certain use cases. I think my "just commute and never fast charge" use case is probably borderline.

 

For our next car we are thinking of getting a fully electric car and charging it from our solar panels for local use. Would I be right in thinking this would be a slower charge and less damaging to the batteries?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

How will you link it to your solar panels?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For our next car we are thinking of getting a fully electric car and charging it from our solar panels for local use. Would I be right in thinking this would be a slower charge and less damaging to the batteries?

 

Leave the car at home, so it can charge up through out the day; just drive it at night, that will not suit most people ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The petrol engine does not remain on when stationary ..it stops...the battery is regenerated mainly by braking..There is no noise...(and no key in the Toyota/Lexus just a push button/fob)...when you start up as there is no starter motor or flywheel to create one,it is not possible to accelerate without pressing the throttle....the hybrid.. (Toyota/Lexus)..will only go up to 20mph before the engine cuts in and only travel around a mile on pure electric.

 

I'm familiar with the Toyota HSD system and have found that the engine does come on occasionally when stationary, more so in winter, due to wipers, heaters, lights, etc being in use more often. I have known the engine to sometimes stay on for a while when stationary, even when the heating is off and the battery isn't low. When this happens, I try to silence the engine by pressing the electric mode button, but it doesn't always oblige. Older hybrid models still use keys.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Let me tell you a story. My car is advertised as good for 160 MPG. But 25 on electric and the battery has gone. 30 on petrol driving steady. Added together that's 55 MPG

 

Where on earth is the stated 160 MPG.

 

There's lies, damn lies and apparently now, car manufacturers :hihi::hihi::hihi::hihi:

 

You have one of the big SUV's like the hybrid Mitsubishi Outlander?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was going to ask, which hybrid is this, there's no reason to keep it a secret.

 

---------- Post added 23-11-2016 at 10:20 ----------

 

Leave the car at home, so it can charge up through out the day; just drive it at night, that will not suit most people ;)

 

Turn off all other electric items in the house as well? And hope that it's sunny I suppose.

 

---------- Post added 23-11-2016 at 10:22 ----------

 

Re:Keyless and push start etc, that's not unique to hybrids, my car is keyless, it has a fob that you just put in your pocket, and a start button inside the car. It also turns off the engine when stationary.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's lies, damn lies and apparently now, car manufacturers :hihi::hihi::hihi::hihi:

 

You have one of the big SUV's like the hybrid Mitsubishi Outlander?

 

 

I certainly do. It's the ONLY electric/hybrid that will tow according to Mitsubishi, as we have a small caravan it was the only option.

 

Angel1.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
For our next car we are thinking of getting a fully electric car and charging it from our solar panels for local use. Would I be right in thinking this would be a slower charge and less damaging to the batteries?

 

Hook it up to the mains. It will slow charge at the optimal rate. Solar panels will charge it as some random rate depending what mood Ra is in.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hook it up to the mains. It will slow charge at the optimal rate. Solar panels will charge it as some random rate depending what mood Ra is in.

 

nice if you have a second car as a toy or green emblem not that practice.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
nice if you have a second car as a toy or green emblem not that practice.

 

No a pure electric is no good as your only car. I took interest for commuting, but I'd have to keep the proper car as well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
No a pure electric is no good as your only car. I took interest for commuting, but I'd have to keep the proper car as well.

 

Brother in law has a Tesla P90D....I teased him about it to be honest...he could have had an S class from his company, but its convinced me. Quoted range is 300, but it does 200 easily, and he almost never visits a charge point...twice a year on holidays, just charges it every night. In many ways its more practical than a petrol or diesel. Oh yes....0-60 in 2.8, but that's not why he bought it....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.