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Winter tyres - recommendations needed

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I have a Subaru Legacy AWD and I fit winter tyres to it. Does that make me a useless driver or someone that simply uses what is available to improve your chances of driving safely in adverse weather conditions?

I chose the car because they are reliable and being a saloon it was cheaper as most people want the estate version or an Impreza. I can't see a problem with wanting a little peace of mind through the winter months. If these types of tyre are so useless, why do other European countries make them compulsory through the winter? Why do tyre companies make them and test them?

Some people on here have a strange attitude to certain aspects of modern technology and yet are posting 'on't internet' about it. There seems to be a lot of d*** waving and 'tha dunt need that fancy stuff' attitude going on. It is quite funny to read though.

I do sometimes wonder though that if my stopping distance is improved by these tyres, what about the guy behind me? Do I brace for impact everytime I slow down?

Edited by lipschitz
addition

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If these types of tyre are so useless, why do other European countries make them compulsory through the winter?
Because these European countries have far colder and worse wintry conditions, on a regular-as-clockwork basis and throughout the winter months, than the UK? ;)

 

Oceanic climate vs continental climate: the deeper into the Continent you go, the lesser the warming effect by the sea mass, the colder the average daytime and night time temperatures.

 

Naturally, oceanic climate is also mitigated by the latitude (think about Scandinavian countries, lots of sea around, but feet and feet of snow guaranteed year-in, year-out).

 

Now look which European countries specify winter tyres as a statutory requirement...

I do sometimes wonder though that if my stopping distance is improved by these tyres, what about the guy behind me? Do I brace for impact everytime I slow down?
Depends if your braking style is influenced by the winter tyres (which, with better grip, allow more sudden and harder braking in wintry conditions) or if you adapt it to the conditions irrespective of the better grip (anticipate more, use engine brake more, start braking earlier and softer = guy behind has more time to take appropriate action) :)

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So, in the situation you mention above, you'd accelerate towards the obstacle?

 

Exactly but it seems some want to argue for the sake of argueing and cant actually read properly.

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Exactly but it seems some want to argue for the sake of argueing and cant actually read properly.

 

IF you are sliding due to loss of traction, explain how you can accelerate?

 

You can't. You've lost traction. Simple.

 

Now we will be at Monsal again tomorrow, so the offers open, come show us tomorrow your leetz driving skillz. 10am. Don't be late and don't chicken out on it like you did last time. I'd love to see your powerspinning out of trouble tricks....

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Because these European countries have far colder and worse wintry conditions, on a regular-as-clockwork basis and throughout the winter months, than the UK? ;)

You don't think we routinely have temperatures below 7 degree's, when winter tyres have better grip?

 

Oceanic climate vs continental climate: the deeper into the Continent you go, the lesser the warming effect by the sea mass, the colder the average daytime and night time temperatures.

I think you mean the greater the climatic extremes.

 

Naturally, oceanic climate is also mitigated by the latitude (think about Scandinavian countries, lots of sea around, but feet and feet of snow guaranteed year-in, year-out).

 

Now look which European countries specify winter tyres as a statutory requirement...

Depends if your braking style is influenced by the winter tyres (which, with better grip, allow more sudden and harder braking in wintry conditions) or if you adapt it to the conditions irrespective of the better grip (anticipate more, use engine brake more, start braking earlier and softer = guy behind has more time to take appropriate action) :)

You can do all those things, WITH winter tyres as well, AND still be able to break harder if something unexpected happens.

 

I haven't fitted winter tyres, but I wouldn't criticise someone who has, they're doing something sensible.

 

---------- Post added 23-01-2015 at 11:08 ----------

 

Exactly but it seems some want to argue for the sake of argueing and cant actually read properly.

 

Did you just agree that you'd ACCELERATE TOWARDS the obstacle towards which you are already sliding...

That really is 133t.

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You don't think we routinely have temperatures below 7 degree's, when winter tyres have better grip?
I do. And also know that we don't routinely have -10C and under at night and -5C and under throughout the day, which climate makes much more of a valid case for winter tyres.

You can do all those things, WITH winter tyres as well, AND still be able to break harder if something unexpected happens.
And my post disagrees with that...how? That was not lipschitz's question which I was answering.

I haven't fitted winter tyres, but I wouldn't criticise someone who has, they're doing something sensible.
I haven't fitted winter tyres either, and have I criticised anyone who has fitted winter tyres?

 

If I moved back permanently or semi-permanently to the family fold near Alsace, I would fit winter tyres every winter as a matter of course. Here, considering the average winter temps, average speeds on my regular routes, the regular routes themselves (95+% "big" A roads and m'ways, priority routes cleared up & gritted) and my regular mileage on them, I don't see the economical point. And after that, each to their own...except for the sort of rubbish winter driving advice posted by e.g. Xt500, that is :hihi:

Edited by L00b

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They work better once the temperature is below 7. It doesn't need to reach -5 or -10 to justify fitting them for about 1/3rd of the year.

 

I've not fitted them for the same reason. Limited mileage, mostly on A roads or low speed city streets, rarely critical journeys, etc...

 

If someone else wants to fit them though, more power (and grip) to them.

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Well the winter tyres on 3 of our cars (TVR doesn't get used if salt is down, and my company don't fit them to my daily hack) have been very useful so far this year.

 

I haven't needed to accelerate towards an obstacle once ! :D

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They work better once the temperature is below 7. It doesn't need to reach -5 or -10 to justify fitting them for about 1/3rd of the year.

 

I've not fitted them for the same reason. Limited mileage, mostly on A roads or low speed city streets, rarely critical journeys, etc...

 

If someone else wants to fit them though, more power (and grip) to them.

 

Partly because I was not expecting to keep my car for long, partly because I'm not doing a great mileage at present (to justify 2 sets of wheels/tyres) and partly because my tyres needed changing anyway, I went for 4 season tyres. They are much nearer winter tyres, but from what I gather they are not as good at very low temperatures, ie below zero. In tests they perform a little worse that winter tyres in winter, and a little better in summer.

 

Although they are marked as 4 season tyres, they still have the "MS" and "snowflake on mountain" symbols, and meet the requirements of those mainland European countries that require winter tyres in winter. I chose a premium make (Goodyear Vector 4 season) after reviewing tests in magazines (mostly Auto Bild, IIRC). Even though they are 4 season tyres they (and other good 4 season tyres by Vredstein and Hankook) still outperformed some of the (cheaper) dedicated winter tyres of other manufacturers in winter conditions.

 

In the tests, there was a marginal disadvantage in some aspects when compared with summer tyres in summer conditions, but that was more than outweighed (IMO) by their advantage over the summer tyres in wintry conditions, and especially in snow and ice.

 

I've been very pleased with them, and the car has felt much more comfortable when trying to manoeuvre and/or gain traction on snow and ice. And I've not noticed any disadvantage during warm weather. They are supposed to be noisier and expected to wear out more quickly, but I've not noticed so far.

 

---------- Post added 23-01-2015 at 16:15 ----------

 

well the winter tyres on 3 of our cars (tvr doesn't get used if salt is down, and my company don't fit them to my daily hack) have been very useful so far this year.

 

i haven't needed to accelerate towards an obstacle once ! :D

 

 

:hihi::hihi::hihi:

Edited by Eater Sundae

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I notice xt500 hasn't been around much.

 

I do hope he hasn't taken his own advice and accelerated his way off the road into a nasty accident..

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