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Noisey Neighbour: stuck between a rock and a hard place

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Hi Guys,

 

Myself my wife and our toddler daughter moved into a council flat just over a year ago.

 

Around 2 weeks after moving in we started to hear blood curdling screems and arguments containing every swearword under the sun and then some. from the next door neighbour.

 

I went downstairs with the intention of knocking on the door to see if there was a problem. However I was met at the bottom of the stairs by an old lady from within our block (who has now moved out). She explained to me that our neighbour is a schitzophrenic and from time to time he stops taking his pills which leads to the screams we heard.

 

One of my close family members is mentally ill so with the knowledge of my neighbours condition I was able to turn a blind eye.

 

Over the last 4 months his outbursts have become a daily event and can last from 10am till 4 or 5 the following morning when he has probably exhasted himself out.

 

This has on occaisions woke us up startled. But now my daughter is picking up on him and she is terrified of our flat and 3 or 4 times a week wakes up with nightmares.

 

So far I have not involved the counsel mainly because I understand that he is suffering himself while ticking.

 

But as a father I feel I need to get my daughter away from the premises. We made the descision last week of sending her to her grandparents for a couple of week so she could get some sleep.

 

Has anyone else had issues with a noisey neighbour and they hve not wanted to report the persom because they know the person isn't making the noises out of choice.

 

The last thing I want to do is get the poor fella kicked out of his own home, but I cant put my daughter through any more of this.

 

Cheers Steve

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It's a difficult one. I have a neighbour a few doors down who seems to have similar mental issues. A few times I have heard her shouting and screaming when she is having a bad episode. I feel really bad for her, it must be so exhausting for her. Part of me wishes I could've helped her in some way, but I wouldn't know what to do.

How well do you know your neighbour? Is he approachable when he isn't having a bad day? I hope he is getting the help he needs.

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I have a neighbour at the moment who insists on playing the same CD multiple times per day at loud volume...

 

Also some religious radio or TV programme, 2 or 3 times per day, at loud volume, with the windows open....

 

have reported to landlord and nothing.... have knocked on their door and first time they said "sorry, sorry" and turned it down..

 

The next time, they said I should move as they have been here ages.. (I have been here almost 5 years, and it's only in the last year they have started this)

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Theres more to this than him just being a noisy neighbour, hes obviously not getting the help he needs. I think you have to report him, for both your sakes.

 

I really hope you get it sorted soon, it mustve been awful to have to send your little one away :(

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I work in mental health, and I was involved in a similar case with an elderly schizophrenic man. The neighbours were understanding at first, but it became too much for them.

To save him the distress of moving elsewhere, the council and a charity contributed to soundproof walls. The funding did take a lot of time and pestering, though.

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Your solution isnt really satisfactory.

 

You dont know this person, but they are affecting you. Complain to the LHA, but point out you just want a solution and you are willing to make a practical comrpomise if possible. It may be the person isnt taking their medication or nothing can be done. Its up to the Council to sort it. There isnt an alternative as even if you talked to him, then he could promise, but how do you know he can control the outbursts? I'd think unlikely.

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Hi Guys,

 

Thank you for the comments.

 

I only know him to say hello to when we bump in to each other in the flats entrance. It's almost impossible to chat to him as he gets away as quick as he can so I guess he is embarrassed for the noise he makes.

 

One of the neighbours says his mother visits every other day, but I have never seen her. She must come around when I am at work.

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Hi Guys,

 

Thank you for the comments.

 

I only know him to say hello to when we bump in to each other in the flats entrance. It's almost impossible to chat to him as he gets away as quick as he can so I guess he is embarrassed for the noise he makes.

 

One of the neighbours says his mother visits every other day, but I have never seen her. She must come around when I am at work.

 

Does anyone else know him. perhaps you can talk to his mum? With the best will in the world he may not be able to control his outbursts.

 

Is it impossible for you to knock on his door or leave a note or call him?

Unless you talk to someone then nothing will change.

I wouldnt bank on them finding the money for soundproofing.

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It is a tricky one Steve. I used to get quite a few similar scenarios in an old job and while it's great that you have an understanding of his problems you both have equal rights and if it's impacting on your daughter then that's not good at all. If you can't manage to speak to him them leaving an understanding note saying you want to talk would be worth trying. It may be that he is getting no support with his mental health and if you point out the effect it's having on your family it might prompt him to ask for help. It might not but it's worth a try.

 

Otherwise I think you should go to SCC. They should be sympathetic, they generally are. They can offer to try to get him some support and the sound proofing idea isn't that outlandish, I once set someone up in a tenancy with sound proofing, funded by mental health services and it worked well. It probably depends how many adjoining walls his property has; the more there are the more expensive it will be and therefore the less likely.

 

He has a right to a home but you also have a right to quiet enjoyment of your home. If it came to it the Council might offer him a bungalow with fewer neighbours, I sorted that for a few people who had difficulty living with others in a block.

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So much respect for your point of view Steve. Your kindness and compassion shine through, both for your neighbour and for your family. That's a rare thing. I'm sure there's no perfect solution (though what Bob Arctor is saying sounds very positive), and I'm equally sure it'll be better for your caring.

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Your doing the right thing by been understanding and not going at it like an bull in an china shop. I had a mate who had schizophrenia everything is fine if the person takes their medication if not then it can go really wrong my mate did this once it was fun and games all the way until help was at hand. If this was me I would contact the council tell them what is happening and the effects on your life. Its unlikely the council will evict him

as its non intentional and not his fault but needs support with medication for his mental well been once this is sorted out it's likely things will settle down .

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