Jump to content


Ched Evans has been cleared..

Recommended Posts

Hmm, yes . . . he managed to get off by dragging his victims' reputation through the dirt.

 

Apparently, she likes to drink and is sexually active.

 

Y'know, the same behaviour Our Chedders likes to participate in at weekends with his friends.

 

So what you're saying here is that they are both as bad as each other.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
So what you're saying here is that they are both as bad as each other.

 

I don't believe anybody would say that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I don't believe anybody would say that.

 

it reads like that

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
i think he should start by sueing the sun newspaper,for there shocking front page story.

 

I would also be looking at what Rizzle Kicks have been saying today as well.

 

Anyway despite what has been written, someone actually did interview Ched for what he had to say.

 

At 2.30pm on Friday at Cardiff crown court, Ched Evans’s life took a new turn. For eight days he had sat in the dock in court 5, listening to the re-telling of a sordid story that had dominated his life for more than five years.

 

The footballer had watched as Mrs Justice Nicola Davies presided, softly spoken and scrupulously fair. “I will never have a judge as good as this one,” he thought. He had looked endlessly at the seven women and five men of the jury. How they reacted to what they were hearing would determine his future.

 

When his legal team told him things were going well he was not presumptuous. If he had learnt anything from 2½ years in prison and his first months of freedom — which had been more difficult than his time behind bars — it was that you never knew what would happen.

 

To get here, he had been through a legal process that rarely succeeds. Only 3%-4% of cases before the Criminal Cases Review Commission are upheld but it had considered his conviction for rape “unsafe” and the Court of Appeal had ordered this retrial.

 

The jury, sent out before midday, returned at 2.30pm, having also broken for lunch. Evans could not stop himself thinking: “If they’ve taken this little time, it’s because they know I’m innocent.”

 

He was right. The verdict was unanimous. “Mr Evans, you are discharged. You can leave the dock,” said Davies.

 

Evans walked into the arms of his fiancée, Natasha Massey. They hugged and sobbed. Later he would talk about a case that has divided the country.

 

When friends said he could now get on with his life as a footballer without the burden of a wrongful rape conviction, he thought: “That’s actually an irrelevance.”

 

He explained: “This has never been about me as a footballer but [about me] as a person, a human being. A father who wants to take his son to the park knowing that no one can look at me and say, ‘He’s a rapist.’ That’s why I wasn’t going to stop until I was proven innocent. From the first day, I would have agreed never to kick another ball in return for people accepting I was not a rapist.”

 

From the beginning there had been a striking incongruity that made me curious about this case. Two men — Evans and his friend Clayton McDonald — have a threesome with a woman in a hotel bedroom, both have sex with her, one is convicted of rape, the other is acquitted.

 

The woman did not complain of rape and insisted she could not recall what happened. At the first trial, the members of the jury decided that she was not in a fit state to consent to sex with Evans and convicted him; but they acquitted McDonald, who shouted at them: “If I’m innocent, he has to be innocent!”

 

What does Evans now feel about the woman, who has received both widespread sympathy and vilification on social media. “I have got mixed emotions really,” he said. “The fact is I cannot say she has ever accused me of rape. She hasn’t. She went to the police, believing her bag had been stolen. When me and Clayton got arrested we told the truth straight away and still to this day five years on she has never claimed that she had been raped.

 

“My belief is that it got put to her that she had been raped by two footballers. But my feelings towards the girl involved is that I can’t actually say I am angry, because — if she genuinely doesn’t remember — it doesn’t mean that we raped her. It doesn’t mean she didn’t consent. It just means that she can’t remember.

 

“I’d be lying if I said I feel some hatred towards her. I don’t. It would probably be more [correct] to say I feel sorry for her because of what she has been put through.

 

“I didn’t ask people on the internet to abuse her. I didn’t condone that. I don’t condone that.”

 

All I have to do is revert back to day one in prison and it trumps any amount of verbal abuse I get

Evans was 12 when he got a trial for Manchester City and was still only 18 when he received his first big monthly pay slip for £35,000. Soon afterwards he went home to his mother’s council house in Rhyl and showed her his new £10,000 watch.

 

“Do you know,” she said, “I’m still paying off catalogue bills from Christmas presents when you were 10 and you’ve just bought a watch that cost £10,000?” It would not be the last time he would disappoint his mother.

 

He was 22, and his team Sheffield United had been relegated at the end of the 2010-11 season, when he went back to Rhyl for the May bank holiday weekend. That Sunday he texted his friend McDonald, whom he’d met when they were teenagers at Manchester City. “Fancy a night out in Rhyl?”

 

“I’m at my Nan’s in Liverpool. Got no clothes.” An hour later McDonald sent a second text. “Found some pants, have you got a T-shirt?”

 

Evans books him a room at Rhyl’s Premier Inn. And so it begins. After an evening’s drinking in the town’s bars the friends get separated. McDonald texts Evans: “I’ve got a bird.”

 

Evans goes to the Premier Inn. “I have gone in the room and at the time Clay is having sex with the woman. As soon as I walked in, and I will never forget this, the door bangs behind me and they have both looked at me.”

 

According to McDonald and Evans, the young woman agrees that Evans can join them. “It escalated into sex and as soon as I did that, I started to think, Tash [girlfriend Natasha] was coming up the next day and I’d better get home because I couldn’t have explained why I’d stayed in the hotel. Clay decided to come with me and he stayed at my house.”

 

Next day his mother called him. “The murder squad is at my house,” she said. That was the single most terrifying moment because he presumed the young woman had died and he and McDonald were being blamed. He rang his friend. “Something’s happened. The murder squad is at my house.”

 

At the police station in Rhyl, Evans answers the police officers’ questions about what happened. There are no “no comments”, nothing that he cannot recall.

 

A month later they were charged with rape, although the woman, aged 19, could not recall what happened and there was no forensic evidence, just their statements.

 

The final moments of the first trial in 2012 were seared onto his consciousness.

 

“How do you find Ched Evans? Guilty, your honour. I look towards the jury. Two women jurors, seated alongside each other on the left side were crying. The young lad who had been looking at Clay and I all through the trial had his head in his hands. Then my head was gone. I couldn’t focus on anything.”

 

Through his 2½ years at HM Prison Wymott in Lancashire, Evans maintained his innocence. When he refused to undergo a sex offender’s rehabilitation course, insisting he didn’t believe he was a sex offender, they denied him enhanced prisoner status.

 

That made his life in prison more difficult. Less phone credit, less access around the prison, worse prison clothes, much less interesting jobs. Evans sewed towels and made key rings for Blackpool Pleasure Beach. “You have to put the plastic bit into a metal ring and get 2,500 done every day.”

 

 

The decision to challenge his conviction turned on the evidence of two new witnesses not involved in the first trial. Each said he had had a sexual relationship with the woman around the time of the alleged rape. Under Section 41 of the Youth Justice and Criminal Evidence Act 1999, a woman’s sexual history cannot be admitted as evidence in rape cases unless it falls within four exceptions.

 

Evans’s legal team argued that ruling the evidence of the new witnesses inadmissible would deny their client a fair trial. The evidence appeared to corroborate what Evans had said about the sexual encounter. The second jury believed them.

 

“When I got the guilty verdict, it was something so bad you just couldn’t imagine,” said Evans. “But having my name cleared, that is even more powerful. It was hard for everyone, my family. My mum, it took a real toll on her.

 

“For Tash, it was hard. We would sit in our house waiting for the next story to come that would hurt Tash, hurt me, hurt my family.”

 

Massey’s support for him has been unwavering. He betrayed her that night in Rhyl and, after finding out, she ended their relationship. Two weeks later, she forgave him. They have been together ever since and now have a nine-month-old son, Flynn.

 

“Tasha’s life would have been easier if she just cut all ties with me the moment I told her I cheated on her,” he said. “She knows me, she knows I wouldn’t commit a crime like that. She didn’t stay with me for money, that’s for sure.

 

“She’s much more advanced in her business career than I am in my football career, and she can go on in her job long after I’ll be finished with the game.

 

“She has got potential to do whatever she wants. I believe we are going to be together for the rest of our lives and we make a perfect team but it would have been easy for Tash to walk away because of the stress and heartache she has had to put up with. My behaviour that night was totally unacceptable but it wasn’t a crime.”

 

He joined League One club Chesterfield at the beginning of the season and has been trying to pick up the thread of his career. Opposition fans target him for abuse.

 

“They sing a song saying, ‘She said no Evans, she said no,’ then finish it with ‘rapist, rapist, rapist,’ ” he says. “You can imagine some of the fouler things that come out of people’s mouths and ten times out of ten the opposition players are saying, ‘Don’t listen to them, get on with the game, just don’t worry about them.’ That’s encouraging considering it is coming from the opposition team.”

 

Does it get to him? “No. Honestly not. All I have to do is revert back to one day in prison and it trumps any amount of verbal abuse. Any single day in prison and the abuse I get compares to it not one bit. On the field I am free. I am playing football. I am getting paid for it. I am looking for a goal. A few people shouting stuff is irrelevant.”

 

This morning he and Natasha will take Flynn to a duck pond near where they live. They’ve thought about this and see it as their little celebration. “I will go there with my fiancée and our son, without that label on my back.

 

“I had to learn to live with being a convicted rapist, to get over the barrier of walking into somewhere and feeling awkward. I did that. Being cleared is for my family, Tash, our son Flynn.

 

“I love football but I could just as easily go fishing. I never believed I was a rapist. But strangers, people in restaurants, in supermarkets, people writing in newspapers, on social media, that’s what they had on me. You have been convicted, you are a convicted rapist.

 

“Then a different group of 12 people turn round and say, actually he’s not a rapist. That is what is so weird.”

 

Case ‘sets law back 30 years’

 

The acquittal of Ched Evans has outraged women’s rights campaigners, who say the case sets a “dangerous precedent” for future rape trials, writes Josh Boswell.

 

Vera Baird, the former solicitor general, said the decision set issues back “probably about 30 years”.

 

She told the BBC that the jury should not have heard “irrelevant” information about the sexual history of the alleged rape victim.

 

Baird, now police and crime commissioner for Northumbria, helped to bring in a law in 1999 banning alleged rape victims from being cross-examined about their sexual behaviour.

 

A spokeswoman for Women Against Rape said the verdict opened “the floodgates to trashing the woman’s character in any rape trial once again”.

 

The Court of Appeal decided that the accounts of two other men who said they had sex with the 19-year-old were so similar to Evans’s case that they could be heard, because of an exception in the law. Appeal judge Lady Justice Hallett said it was a “rare case” and the evidence was admissible only because the defence had “overcome the high hurdle of relevance and similarity”.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This needs moving out of general sports thread.

Its very little to do with sport if at all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This needs moving out of general sports thread.

Its very little to do with sport if at all.

 

I agree. It's a bigger issue than just football. Are all the threads about historical sex abuse in Entertainment Chat?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
This needs moving out of general sports thread.

Its very little to do with sport if at all.

 

please no.

 

Just leave it here and the entire shameful ordeal should hopefully be forgotten about before too long.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To be convicted of rape when there is clearly NO evidence is an outrage not just against Chad but against the 'criminal' justice system.

 

She did not even allege she was raped.

 

The justice system is indeed criminal.

 

A very large compensation payout is in order here - upwards of two million pounds.

 

Of course no amount of money can return the years that were taken away fom him.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To be convicted of rape when there is clearly NO evidence is an outrage not just against Chad but against the 'criminal' justice system.

 

She did not even allege she was raped.

 

The justice system is indeed criminal.

 

A very large compensation payout is in order here - upwards of two million pounds.

 

Of course no amount of money can return the years that were taken away fom him.

 

Wrong. The MAXIMUM compensation he can receive from the state is £500,000 and he has to apply for it and the relevant body decides if he will receive it.

 

That body should make the decision in the same way they would for anyone else.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No need for that Santo.

 

Mac33 only said what he thought was in order.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To be convicted of rape when there is clearly NO evidence is an outrage not just against Chad but against the 'criminal' justice system.

 

She did not even allege she was raped.

 

The justice system is indeed criminal.

 

A very large compensation payout is in order here - upwards of two million pounds.

 

Of course no amount of money can return the years that were taken away fom him.

 

 

 

An interesting post - the same system you criticise has allowed his appeal against conviction, ordered the re-trial at which he was acquitted.

 

I am not sure how you feel able to say there was no evidence - if that was the position he would never have been charged in the first place.

 

As for compensation that has its own process - he is apparently suing the first firm (one of many her father paid for) of solicitors.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
To be convicted of rape when there is clearly NO evidence is an outrage not just against Chad but against the 'criminal' justice system.

 

She did not even allege she was raped.

 

The justice system is indeed criminal.

 

A very large compensation payout is in order here - upwards of two million pounds.

 

Of course no amount of money can return the years that were taken away fom him.

 

I've just read this woman was so hammered on that night she wet the bed. Evans father in law put a £50k reward for past lovers to highlight her sexual past. And all admitted into court.

 

A criminal justice system indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.