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Beggars, homeless, street drinkers & drug users in Sheffield!

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16 hours ago, Ms Macbeth said:

Supported housing such as the type your friend works in is great, for those who have it.  As a volunteer in a charity, I meet people in exactly those circumstances.  The level of care differs according to need, and the result can be independence and a reasonable quality of life.  Its expensive, but the outcome is usually worth it.

 

That leaves those with undiagnosed/unsupported learning difficulties and/or mental health issues, living chaotic lives.  Those are the people who can't deal with benefits, bills, housing etc., and may end up on the street.   Universal Credit has not helped people like them.  Listening to a doctor on TV recently (I think it was Panorama), he said the system had had to change, because it was so open to abuse.  I can't disagree with that view, again through volunteering, I meet people without mental or physical disabilities who just haven't worked for years.  Changes to the rules have meant that now they at least have to try to find work. Unfortunately, its the most vulnerable who have become the real casualties. 

Totally agree-said friend lost previous job as provider withdrew due to unprofitably. System totally wrong-eg people with DownsSyndrome have to undergo regular PIP assessments WHY! Chromosomes aren’t going to change

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On 13/12/2019 at 09:42, alchresearch said:

And you forget how horrible places like this were.  People locked away, abused and ill treated, institutionalised. 

 

The writing was on the wall for places like this as far back as the 60s.

I used to work at Middlewood in the early 70s, and yes they were not always nice places, but they were better than a shop doorway.

 

Care in the Community was a great idea, and it was part of my job to prepare people who were institutionalised for life outside before they were moved into smaller group homes with a carer, (quite possibly with catmiss' mum...?)

When it works, it works well, but this kind of care was/is expensive.  

As with all cuts to services, it wasn't long before problems arose and the level of criteria for this type of care was raised, so many people began to slip through the net.

For the many there were eventually few placements available, and  an inevitable downward spiral, until finally there was no care at all.  

 

As Ms Macbeth says, there are now many people with mental health issues living chaotic lives who just can't cope, especially when up against a complex, difficult system like Universal credit. 

Edited by Anna B

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1 minute ago, Anna B said:

I used to work at Middlewood in the early 70s, and yes they were not always nice places, but they were better than a shop doorway.

 

Care in the Community was a great idea, and it was part of my job to prepare people who were institutionalised for life outside before they were moved into smaller group homes with a carer. When it works, it works well, but this kind of care was/is expensive.  

As with all cuts to services, it wasn't long before problems arose and the level of criteria for this type of care was raised, so many people began to slip through the net.

For the many there were eventually few placements available, and  a downward spiral, until finally there was no care at all.  

 

As Ms Macbeth says, there are now many people with mental health issues living chaotic lives who just can't cope, especially when up against a complex, difficult system like Universal credit. 

Remember it well - by the late 80's "Care In the Community" was giving somebody a carrier bag for their belongings and their bus fare to town.

 

And yes - people with complex needs are being sanctioned at the drop of a hat. Grants to support providers have been slashed due to massive cuts to Local Government funding and it is the most vulnerable who are suffering.

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How can you expect people struggling to survive day to day without support to conform to the statutory imposed regulations. Let’s hope Boris’ “People’s government” lives up to the name

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27 minutes ago, catmiss said:

How can you expect people struggling to survive day to day without support to conform to the statutory imposed regulations. Let’s hope Boris’ “People’s government” lives up to the name

I won't hold my breath. . . 

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Me neither!

23 hours ago, Anna B said:

I won't hold my breath. . . 

Me neither!

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Unfortunately a lot of the people on the streets have other issues too such as drug and mental health issues.

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15 hours ago, ZaphodUK said:

Unfortunately a lot of the people on the streets have other issues too such as drug and mental health issues.

Always have. (Not all of them of course.) But it doesn't explain the phenomenal rise in homelessness over the last few years.

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15 minutes ago, Anna B said:

Always have. (Not all of them of course.) But it doesn't explain the phenomenal rise in homelessness over the last few years.

No. It's due to Tory policy, which is aimed at enriching the rich and screwing the poor.

 

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1 hour ago, Halibut said:

No. It's due to Tory policy, which is aimed at enriching the rich and screwing the poor.

 

I couldn't agree more. Austerity still on the agenda yet working class people voted for the Tories in droves. I'd like a working class Tory voter to explain that, I really would. . . 

Edited by Anna B

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Personal attacks against a user have been removed. Any further and you will find your account suspended.

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The way Councils administer the Homelessness Act also plays a part, particularly the medical/vulnerable criteria. Before austerity SCC would be accept some people with substance misuse and/or mental health into these categories but this became less common as budgets shrank.  As these, probably most vulnerable individuals, took the hostel places others fell by the wayside. Charitable accommodation, stripped of grants, could do less rehabilitation and could not contain antisocial behaviour-some of the long-standing homeless are banned from  many provisions. Sheffield has only 2 male direct access hostels which are always full and, unlike  many other large cities, no night shelter

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