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Beggars, homeless, street drinkers & drug users in Sheffield!

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On 29/10/2019 at 00:07, Jim Hardie said:

Work.

And become one of the working poor, still on benefits.  0 hour contract, no security - that's even if you can get a job, which, as has been pointed out, is near impossible without an address and a roof over your head.

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8 hours ago, Anna B said:

And become one of the working poor, still on benefits.  0 hour contract, no security - that's even if you can get a job, which, as has been pointed out, is near impossible without an address and a roof over your head.

you can blame the unions for letting minimum wage and zero hour contracts in. Now don't get me wrong there were jobs out there that needed protecting, especially some of the small cuttlery firms (sweat shops) operating in Sheffield, but it was obvious instead of being able to negotiate any wage rise management only had to pay the minimum wage. and that's exactly what they have been doing untill reacently although the min & living wage now introduced is still far from what some of us were earning 20 years ago. 

 

 

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19 hours ago, Anna B said:

And become one of the working poor, still on benefits.  0 hour contract, no security - that's even if you can get a job, which, as has been pointed out, is near impossible without an address and a roof over your head.

First step should be getting working habit. Instead, you know, other habits.

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3 hours ago, Branyy said:

First step should be getting working habit. Instead, you know, other habits.

ooh- can of worms opened here! So where to start family, education , lack of social activities, mental health provision, relationship breakdown, poverty etc. My work ethic came from family and education but was nurtured by the rest- not everyone is so fortunate 

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7 hours ago, catmiss said:

ooh- can of worms opened here! So where to start family, education , lack of social activities, mental health provision, relationship breakdown, poverty etc. My work ethic came from family and education but was nurtured by the rest- not everyone is so fortunate 

Sure, that's why they to get that work ethic now.

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On 05/12/2019 at 07:24, Branyy said:

Sure, that's why they to get that work ethic now.

I think you’ve missed the point-the escalation of family breakdown and unemployment of the last few decades combined with lower standards in education, health and other social provision has weakened the work ethic for a lot of people whose offspring then perpetuate having no example or motivation 

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On 04/12/2019 at 00:46, Anna B said:

And become one of the working poor, still on benefits.  0 hour contract, no security - that's even if you can get a job, which, as has been pointed out, is near impossible without an address and a roof over your head.

Zero Hour contracts still in use by so many Labour councils.  

 

Welsh Labour councils employ 1000s on Zero Hours contracts – despite Corbyn pledges

https://www.welshconservatives.com/news/welsh-labour-councils-employ-1000s-zero-hours-contracts-despite-corbyn-pledges

 

Labour council employs one in ten staff on zero hours contracts despite Jeremy Corbyn's vow to ban them

https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/2017/08/22/labour-council-employs-one-ten-staff-zero-hours-contracts-despite/

 

 

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12 hours ago, catmiss said:

I think you’ve missed the point-the escalation of family breakdown and unemployment of the last few decades combined with lower standards in education, health and other social provision has weakened the work ethic for a lot of people whose offspring then perpetuate having no example or motivation 

You missed out the big mental hospitals like Middlewood being closed and replaced with 'care in the community' which failed to happen. 

A lot of the people who should be in hospital are now on the streets.

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20 hours ago, Anna B said:

You missed out the big mental hospitals like Middlewood being closed and replaced with 'care in the community' which failed to happen. 

A lot of the people who should be in hospital are now on the streets.

And you forget how horrible places like this were.  People locked away, abused and ill treated, institutionalised. 

 

The writing was on the wall for places like this as far back as the 60s.

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3 hours ago, alchresearch said:

And you forget how horrible places like this were.  People locked away, abused and ill treated, institutionalised. 

 

The writing was on the wall for places like this as far back as the 60s.

and now these people have no walls to write on

Edited by andyofborg

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12 hours ago, andyofborg said:

and now these people have no walls to write on

In the 70s my mum worked at Middlewood and on her day off would sometimes bring four elderly ladies home for tea-their only excursion outside. All four had been placed in the hospital decades before for social ‘crimes’ such as prostitution, pilfering and having  illegitimate children-prior to the welfare state. By the time of the Reform Act these women were so institutionalised they had to remain in ‘care’. My friend now works in the community where people with learning difficulties and enduring mental health are cared for 24 hrs in 2-4 bedrooms bungalows. They attend regular social activities/excursions and have a variety of brought in therapies. I know which I would favour.

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5 hours ago, catmiss said:

In the 70s my mum worked at Middlewood and on her day off would sometimes bring four elderly ladies home for tea-their only excursion outside. All four had been placed in the hospital decades before for social ‘crimes’ such as prostitution, pilfering and having  illegitimate children-prior to the welfare state. By the time of the Reform Act these women were so institutionalised they had to remain in ‘care’. My friend now works in the community where people with learning difficulties and enduring mental health are cared for 24 hrs in 2-4 bedrooms bungalows. They attend regular social activities/excursions and have a variety of brought in therapies. I know which I would favour.

Supported housing such as the type your friend works in is great, for those who have it.  As a volunteer in a charity, I meet people in exactly those circumstances.  The level of care differs according to need, and the result can be independence and a reasonable quality of life.  Its expensive, but the outcome is usually worth it.

 

That leaves those with undiagnosed/unsupported learning difficulties and/or mental health issues, living chaotic lives.  Those are the people who can't deal with benefits, bills, housing etc., and may end up on the street.   Universal Credit has not helped people like them.  Listening to a doctor on TV recently (I think it was Panorama), he said the system had had to change, because it was so open to abuse.  I can't disagree with that view, again through volunteering, I meet people without mental or physical disabilities who just haven't worked for years.  Changes to the rules have meant that now they at least have to try to find work. Unfortunately, its the most vulnerable who have become the real casualties. 

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