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Supertram future- consultation

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Looks like the consultation form has been written by an 8 year old - asks for your postcode, and the next question is 'which area do you live in' - duh

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Studies have shown that the majority of drivers would not use public transport, even if it were free.

 

Studies said it would be a good idea to build the tramlines where tower blocks were being knocked down.

THAT is the value of studies.

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Studies said it would be a good idea to build the tramlines where tower blocks were being knocked down.

THAT is the value of studies.

 

Where were those areas? Kelvin? There are still plenty of people using the tram to and from Hillsborough and Middlewood. I can't think of many areas the trams serve that aren't well-populated other than between Attercliffe and Meadowhall.

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Whatever a tram ('super' or otherwise) can do, a trolleybus can do better. No need for road-digging/closures, no track to lay, no getting blocked by parked cars etc., no need to import specially-made vehicles from Europe.

 

I agree and believe it was also proposed before several years ago. Another benefit is because they also had batteries they could go off the grid as it were.

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I agree and believe it was also proposed before several years ago. Another benefit is because they also had batteries they could go off the grid as it were.

 

Trolley buses have all the advantages referred to, but nowhere in Britain now operates them. Why not?

 

I encountered them in Newcastle and Hull. They went because the ordinary bus is a lot more flexible. No wires, poles and sub-stations to maintain. The trolleys would come off the wires and they'd get stranded in the middle of junctions with trolleys entwined amongst the wires. Chaos to get sorted out.

 

Junctions required points for the wires. Any minor road changes, just lane alterations, required alterations to the wiring. New roundabouts were a real killer. Single manned vehicles could be problematic.

 

They are far quieter, smoother, and less polluting. Some European cities have still got them, but not many. If they were so brilliant I'm sure they'd be introduced. I liked them.

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Trolley buses have all the advantages referred to, but nowhere in Britain now operates them. Why not?

 

Because buses took over when petrol became the cheaper option and they were scrapped.

 

 

They are far quieter, smoother, and less polluting. Some European cities have still got them, but not many. If they were so brilliant I'm sure they'd be introduced. I liked them.

 

Give it time and maybe they will be, just like electric cars are now being introduced. Many cities around the world are now re introducing them with backup batteries or diesel backup engines. I have ridden on many and cant remember ever having problems with one suddenly stopping or getting stranded in the middle of junctions. I was pretty certain and thought they had a backup battery as well but cant find much information on the old system.

Edited by apelike

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Sorry apelike, my memory is very clear. I lived near a major cross roads with trolley bus routes from all sides. It didn't happen every day, but quite often they'd misjudge the junction and the trolleys would come off the wires, then spring up and get dragged across the suspending cables, sometimes bringing down the wires, but getting tangled up was quite common. Battery back up was of limited help then. Of course it shouldn't have happened, but when it did having the conductor to hold the tangled trolley down was essential as the driver moved back and forth to release it. We kids loved watching what we thought was fun.

 

Yes, fuel prices didn't help, but imagine stringing wires across all the lanes of some of the complex roundabouts and junctions, requiring very elaborate electrical point work and lane adherance to allow trolley buses to get round from all sides.

Edited by 1978

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Sorry apelike, my memory is very clear. I lived near a major cross roads with trolley bus routes from all sides. It didn't happen every day, but quite often they'd misjudge the junction and the trolleys would come off the wires, then spring up and get dragged across the suspending cables, sometimes bringing down the wires, but getting tangled up was quite common. Battery back up was of limited help then. Of course it shouldn't have happened, but when it did having the conductor to hold the tangled trolley down was essential as the driver moved back and forth to release it. We kids loved watching what we thought was fun.

 

Yes, fuel prices didn't help, but imagine stringing wires across all the lanes of some of the complex roundabouts and junctions, requiring very elaborate electrical point work and lane adherance to allow trolley buses to get round from all sides.

 

See my edit as you are probably correct. Its my memory that seems to have faded. :blush:

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Some European cities have converted trolleybus routes to light rail/trams which can supply higher capacity vehicles and are more popular with passengers , it is much easier to get get motorists out of their cars onto rail based transport than buses of any mode which are still seen as down market and give a poor ride due to the condition of the roads .

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Studies have shown that the majority of drivers would not use public transport, even if it were free.

Were you in Sheffield when bus fares were frozen for several years?

The evidence shows that the freeze did in fact cause a large increase in bus usership; and that was all lost just as soon as the fares freeze was reversed.

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Studies have shown that the majority of drivers would not use public transport, even if it were free.

 

Can you provide a link?

Edited by the fonz

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..... and yet another consultation in 2018.

 

£230million is being sought from Westminster to provide new rolling stock and replace infrastructure.

 

As part of this, your views are being requested:

 

 

SYPTE:

http://www.sypte.co.uk/Media.aspx?id=5940

 

SURVEY:

https://www.surveygizmo.eu/s3/90074191/Mass-Transit-Questionnaire

 

YORKSHIRE POST:

https://www.yorkshirepost.co.uk/news/sheffield-supertram-network-could-be-closed-forever-unless-bosses-raise-230million-from-government-1-9364608

 

 

 

.... Oh ... here is the report on the 2016 Consultation:

https://www.sypte.co.uk/uploadedFiles/Corporate/Consultation_and_Market_Research/APPENDIX%20A%20-%20Future%20of%20Supertram%20Consultation%20Report.pdf

Edited by cgksheff

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