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Hadfields Steel Works

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Before demolition, there was a large clock on the east side of Hadfield's, facing the cooling towers. Does anyone have a photo that I could have a copy of please or know where I can find one? I've searched 'Picture Sheffield' without success. Thanks.

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I remember a number of the gang from the electric worshop and used to work for a long time with Brian Bailey, "Diamondray", is correct there were some really good guys I remeber Billy Mc, who used to hepl Albert Sherwood and the guys that used to rewind the armatures and motors that seemed to be constantly coming in, Ken helped Doug and Kev Obrien. I worked from 1972 to closing, shame we didn't win more on Ernie or the pools. Now living and working overseas in Bermuda. I will look out for updates on the site now that I have stumbled across it. I was lucky to get around a lot of the plant working from the Electric workshop and meet so many people in all departments.

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Granagemill Lane. Still there under another name (owned by Italians) and still making crankshafts :huh:

hadfields east hecla was at Vulcan road hecla was at newhall road the entrance was just before the river don and ran through to Stevenson road it hardened forged steel rolls I worked at hecla works until it closed in 1978. Tiny Roland owned it then and sold out to firth browns which is now Sheffield forgemasters I am still there now

Eric

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Hi,

 

The Hadfield's that used to be where the Meadowhall Shopping Centre is now was know as Hadfield's East Hecla Works. Off Vulcan Road, as noted by others.

 

The name East Hecla was to distinguish it from Hafield's orginal Hecla Works. These works were roughly behind where Attercliffe Church used to be, but a bit closer to town. Don't know where the main entrance was. Could have been off Newhall Road or somwhere off Oaks Green.

 

Somebody mentioned Shardlows. They used to be next to Arthur Lee's at Woolley Woods. Can't remember the name of the road that Shardlow's works was located on but I think it ran from Meadowhall Road throught to Grange Lane. All a long time ago.

 

Regards

The Hecla works entrance was on Newhall Rd,I was sent there for 6 months as part of my apprenticeship around 1962 or 1963.My apprenticeship was from 1961 to 1966, I left in1969,spending 7plus years at the East Hecla Works.The company was divided into two around1967, Dunford- Hadfields was the bigger one the other was Osborn- Hadfields I was with the latter one when I left.

 

---------- Post added 05-03-2015 at 17:01 ----------

 

Hadfields became Dunford Hadfields around 1966/67.When i recieved my apprentice served Blacksmith certificate it had DunfieldHadfields on the top of it and this was 1968.At the same time the foundry (which was at the time the longest foundry in the world 440yards long) was taken over by Osbourns thus giving Dunford and Osbourn Hadfields.Hadfields had their own sports ground on bawtry road and a number of football teams and cricket teams.We used to play inter-departmental matches as well.

They also had an enormous slag heap located at Catcliffe which was responsible for the famous floods the village used to endure.

 

---------- Post added 05-03-2015 at 17:06 ----------

 

So glad I've chanced upon this thread. I'm a writer, currently working on a novel and researching for my story.

 

What pubs were frequented by workers from Hadfields around mid 50's/early 60's?

 

I have the Bridge Inn, Meadowhall Road in mind but I'd welcome any other suggestions. And any descriptions/info would be really helpful.

Used the Plumpers at the Tinsley end

 

---------- Post added 05-03-2015 at 19:30 ----------

 

You probably knew my dad,Pete Campbell,who worked in No.1 M/C shop office 1962-74 after he had a serious accident in the 4-ton hammer shop.

 

As an apprentice fitter ,I changed the seals on the 4 ton hammer many times,along with the resident fitter Howard.I was at Hadfields from 1961 to 1969 Terry Bingham rings a bell, did he have red hair?

 

---------- Post added 05-03-2015 at 20:23 ----------

 

Hello Fellow Hadfields Aficianados.

I'm glad there are some of us still walking the planet. I'm Neil Furniss. I started work at Vulcan Road in1962, as an apprentice welder. I did my four and a half years at college, and then when I qualified, stayed for a year or so, then left and went contracting, before returning to work there in Central Maintenance in 1970, and finally left in 1982.

We (all the guys in our workshop) used to work in all the different departments on the plant, which was good, because life never got too boring. Most of the other lads (no ladies in overalls then!) on maintenance were allied to a particular department, i.e. Melting Shop, Rolling Mills, Forge, etc. all had their own dedicated fitters, tricians, and so on, but we went wandering where ever we were required.

I worked shifts for most of my time there. We worked in teams, initially a welder and plater, then later two welders and a plater. This was necessary when more and more fitters forgot how to use spanners to take nuts and bolts apart and put new ones in their place. It became far easier for them to call us out to a breakdown on the plant to burn the bolts out with oxy-ac and then weld the bits back together when they had finished playing with them. It was called the hot spanner/electric bolt syndrome!

It was well know that if the fitters were called out to a breakdown on their patch they could call us out even before they had put their cups of tea down!

You can laugh, but it takes a bit of doing, does that! :hihi:

I loved my time there, and I miss it still, even though I am now retired. The kudos and esteem of working at a successful innovative company was enormous.

My two regular teammates were Tony Holliday, with the black beard, (told from time to time that he looked like Jesus!) sadly no longer with us, and Ian Graham, a Scots lad, who as far as I know, is still around.

Both brilliant blokes, great to work with, and bloody good fun, which helped a lot in some dirty, dark, dank, horrible places we had to work in! And that was just in the offices! (Only kidding!)

Fond memories indeed. Regards to all.

Hello Neil, remember the Bucket Shop,mid sixties,if so see if you can guess who I am, my user name could give you a clue.

Edited by TORONTONY
TYPING ERROR

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My uncle George Milner worked for Edgar Allen and Hadfields retiring from the latter in December 1965. He was presented with a wrist watch payed for by contributions from his work colleagues. Sadly the watch was stolen from his sister Daisy's house in a burglary Oct 1st 1991 (about 6 months before he passed away). However the thieves did not take the list of contributors ( 117 in total!). I have scanned the list which i can e-mail privately, providing there are not too many requests!

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Hi -I knew Linda Denial, she was well known for her very short skirts and high heels. I distinctly remember she had a short black leather skirt which she wore usually with a frilly white blouse, sheer black stockings and black stillettos. She used to cause quite a stir when crossing the yard. One man was heard to say he "felt sorry for that lass because she had grown out of all her clothes!" Nonetheless, we younger ones were envious of her aplomb and style. There was also a cousin Trevor Denial, who I was at school with.

I seem to remember Trevor as an apprentice fitter a couple or so years behind me, I left in1969 but seem to think I worked with him in one of the many fitters cabins in the plant in earlier years.

 

---------- Post added 13-03-2015 at 16:43 ----------

 

I also worked in the offices at Hadfields as a young woman around 1968/71, and had some wonderful times there. I worked in the Shipping Office as a typist and worked for Mr. Mayhew and Mr. William Shakespeare, both very smart and great to work for. There were some real characters in the office, and the older ones all looked out for you. I also had a cousin who worked in another office there called Linda Denial. My uncle, Sid Bird, who has now passed away, also worked in the steelworks there. I think the Main Gates were right at the bottom of Vulcan Road off the main Road. Happy Days.

Was your uncle Sid a fitter, a tall slim balding blonde haired guy? ,if so I am pretty sure I worked with him in the 60's, sorry to hear of his passing, he was probably mid 80's, I would guess.

,

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Tony Barber, perchance?

 

You perchanced correctly, how are ya?Hard to imagine a half century has passed since we last spoke. How long have you been retired? I only hung them up last August at 69 plus, didn't have much choice I got a detached retina there you go, still not fixed yet. Hope you are in good health, enjoyed your post very much....cheers..TB

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Eyup Tony! Good to make contact with you! My email is nissfur@aol.com. Send me your e-address, and I'll catch up with you in private.

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Anyone around that used to work in Admin side. I was in Works Director's and Forgings Office situated on ground floor of main building on Vulcan road from when I came out of RAF in 1953 for a few years. Can share a few memories if anyone interested.

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Worked in the drawing office for a short period, boss called Bumpstead. There was a very ancient draffy who surrounded his desk with card board and had a yellow duster around his neck, -- to keep out the draughts from the bottom door to the toilets. Surely the ultimate draughtsman! I have somewhere a metal badge from the wartime saying "Hadfield fire watcher"

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I worked in an area in same building and top floor as drawing office at opposite end. Can remember a guy called Dennis who was a really snappy dresser. My supervisor was a nice chap called Arthur Tupman, another chap in the office was Bert Goodlad, a real character... remember getting a miniscule pay rise, he got something like a couple of shillings and he sent it back in an envelope to the Works Director who was Major Freeman with a note saying if thats all the company could afford, they needed it more than he did, he walked out of course. I left around 1955 and went to TW Wards then came back to Hadfields a couple of years later to work in the office of the Forgings Director under Ted Booth who was my boss. I married a girl from the Purchasing Office and left Hadfields again after a couple of years.

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