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I assue you mean this: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-36941960

 

HP has apologised after an error on its website let shoppers buy expensive laptop computers for less than £2.

 

One device was listed with a previous sale price of £2,376, but was "reduced" to £1.58.

The computer firm briefly took its UK store offline on Saturday to resolve the error and said it would not honour the sales which had been made.

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according to consumer rights group Citizens Advice, retailers can often cancel online orders if they have made a "genuine and honest mistake on their part that you should have noticed".

 

How some morons didn't think ordering 100's of laptops at £2 a piece wasn't going to get noticed I don't know.

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IIRC it is an offer to purchase - so if the company don't supply the goods they obviously cant keep the money.

 

An offer occurs when you make an offer, verbally, in writing, etc... When you hand over money a contract has been formed. That contract can include terms to allow either party to cancel though of course.

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An offer occurs when you make an offer, verbally, in writing, etc... When you hand over money a contract has been formed. That contract can include terms to allow either party to cancel though of course.

 

Good luck fighting this one in court. The Law is simple. Mistakes happen, he retailer is not required to sell the item for the price advertised. Debit cards are also not the same as handing over cash. The Retailer will lock the amount on order, but most only debit the amount when the item ships.

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Fighting what in court? Are you even reading what I've written?

 

I haven't once claimed that the retailer is obliged to honour the order. Nor did I claim that an advertisement requires the sale at that price (it's an invitation to treat, we all know that).

 

That contract can include terms to allow either party to cancel though of course.

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Fighting what in court? Are you even reading what I've written?

 

I haven't once claimed that the retailer is obliged to honour the order. Nor did I claim that an advertisement requires the sale at that price (it's an invitation to treat, we all know that).

 

You don't understand contracts or contract law as much as you think or how retailers process orders and payments.

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You haven't read what I've written have you.

 

This

 

he retailer is not required to sell the item for the price advertised.

Was a strawman, I'd never made a claim that this was the case.

 

Now you don't want to admit it.

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An offer occurs when you make an offer, verbally, in writing, etc... When you hand over money a contract has been formed. That contract can include terms to allow either party to cancel though of course.

 

I thought offers werent accepetd unless the offeror had agreed to be irrevocably bound?

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A company is not obliged to sell you anything. Some company's do send the items out at that price as a gesture of good will but you are more likely to get a refund.

 

This is correct.

 

---------- Post added 01-08-2016 at 19:04 ----------

 

As I understand it, once payment has been taken a contract has been agreed and they must honour it.

 

Keep it quiet though, the less people who buy it the more chance you have to get it at the miss price (that said, pls drop me a quick link if they are still at this low price :) ).

 

This is wrong. No idea why people continue to believe it.

 

---------- Post added 01-08-2016 at 19:05 ----------

 

How some morons didn't think ordering 100's of laptops at £2 a piece wasn't going to get noticed I don't know.

 

Because there's always another moron claiming that they'll get it, even in the face of clear evidence that it's not true.

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An offer occurs when you make an offer, verbally, in writing, etc... When you hand over money a contract has been formed. That contract can include terms to allow either party to cancel though of course.

 

A contact is made when a trader excepts an offer. In a physical store this would normally occur when cash changes hands.

 

This is different online because the retailer has not had chance to see the offer before money has changed hands. Therefore as long as the retailer puts something in their Ts and Cs explaining when the contract will be formed then they can refund the customer's money without any comeback before this point. Most retailers will stipulate that the contract is not formed until the item has been dispatched.

 

And to add - no the retailer cannot cancel a contract once it has been formed without being in breach of contract.

Edited by Love2print

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An offer occurs when you make an offer, verbally, in writing, etc... When you hand over money a contract has been formed. That contract can include terms to allow either party to cancel though of course.

 

But "handing over the money" isn't the same online as in a shop, thats the part you don't seem to get.

 

The terms of use of the website may specify that an acceptance email is not necessarily the start of a contract in terms of selling something - but there is a difference between accepting the terms of a website (by using it) and the start of a contract to sell.

 

Where that is the case (and it usually is the case if lawyers have been involved in the writing up of the website t&cs) even the handing over of the money and an acceptance email is considered to only be an offer of a contract (from you, the prospective buyer) - the sellers still have to accept it at a later stage for their to be a valid sales contract.

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A contact is made when a trader excepts an offer. In a physical store this would normally occur when cash changes hands.

 

This is different online because the retailer has not had chance to see the offer before money has changed hands. Therefore as long as the retailer puts something in their Ts and Cs explaining when the contract will be formed then they can refund the customer's money without any comeback before this point. Most retailers will stipulate that the contract is not formed until the item has been dispatched.

 

And to add - no the retailer cannot cancel a contract once it has been formed without being in breach of contract.

 

Unless the contract has a term allowing for cancellation of course.

And if no contract exists when the money has been handed over, then the retailer would be free to just keep the money.

 

---------- Post added 02-08-2016 at 07:43 ----------

 

But "handing over the money" isn't the same online as in a shop, thats the part you don't seem to get.

 

The terms of use of the website may specify that an acceptance email is not necessarily the start of a contract in terms of selling something - but there is a difference between accepting the terms of a website (by using it) and the start of a contract to sell.

 

Where that is the case (and it usually is the case if lawyers have been involved in the writing up of the website t&cs) even the handing over of the money and an acceptance email is considered to only be an offer of a contract (from you, the prospective buyer) - the sellers still have to accept it at a later stage for their to be a valid sales contract.

 

So we're back to the retailer having your money, but no contract to supply goods/services existing. They can just keep your money.

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