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The OP is obviously a dishonest person.

 

why do you say that?

 

there is nothing in the original post which indicates that

 

if a company makes a mistake on their pricing and deliver goods at that price then that's good luck for the purchaser.

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Please gamston why are you saying that the op is a dishonest person not sure what you mean?

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As I understand it, once payment has been taken a contract has been agreed and they must honour it.

 

Keep it quiet though, the less people who buy it the more chance you have to get it at the miss price (that said, pls drop me a quick link if they are still at this low price :) ).

 

Not sure about that really. We paid for an item in B&Q which had to be delivered. They had a lot in stock but they sold them all before the delivery date and phoned to say they were out of stock and wouldn't be getting any more. I went down to sort it out. Now I would have thought they would have put one aside for delivery when we paid but they said they have nowhere to store anything so they don't do that.

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Please gamston why are you saying that the op is a dishonest person not sure what you mean?

An honest person would telephone or email the company and tell them that they think they have have made a mistake in the pricing.

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Generally the terms and conditions of online shopping state that the contract is only in place once it is delivered, so no they don't have to honour the incorrect price.

 

Its different to a shop where the contract is formed once payment is made.

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T&C's can't change the way contract law works though. The exchange of monies forms the contract generally, otherwise, without a contract in place, they could just keep your money and supply nothing.

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Most online stores have something in the terms and conditions now that cover for such things....

 

I remember a big Amazon foul-up a few years ago with something, (can't remember quite what) but they offered something at £25 that should have been £2500 (or somewhere there abouts) they had loads of orders, some even got through to confirmation stage, and paid for etc..

 

they then cancelled all orders and refunded everyone...

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T&C's can't change the way contract law works though. The exchange of monies forms the contract generally, otherwise, without a contract in place, they could just keep your money and supply nothing.

 

They can and do change when a contract comes into effect though.

 

eg http://www.telegraph.co.uk/finance/personalfinance/money-saving-tips/10602641/Price-glitches-Do-retailers-have-to-honour-pricing-mistakes.html

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What that actually says is that they reserve the right to cancel (ie this is a term of the contract that HAS been formed).

 

The situation is not as clear-cut online.

The legally binding contract is complete when a retailer accepts an order. However, acceptance does not necessarily happen at the point of order. Even the confirmation email may not be an acceptance. Some retailers reserve the right to cancel an order up to the point of delivery.

 

So it's not that the contract hasn't been formed, it's simply that there is an option for them to terminate the contract, much like a customer could return something.

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What that actually says is that they reserve the right to cancel (ie this is a term of the contract that HAS been formed).

 

So it's not that the contract hasn't been formed, it's simply that there is an option for them to terminate the contract, much like a customer could return something.

 

I read it differently tbh - to say that the order has not been accepted at that point, and therefore there can't be a contract formed.

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So they've taken your money and no contract to supply anything exists... They could just choose to keep it...

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So they've taken your money and no contract to supply anything exists... They could just choose to keep it...

 

 

IIRC it is an offer to purchase - so if the company don't supply the goods they obviously cant keep the money.

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